Another outspoken foreign journalist expelled, banned for five years

first_img to go further News RussiaEurope – Central Asia News Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders condemns Russia’s decision to ban well-known US journalist David Satter from visiting the country’s for five years. Announcing the decision on 14 January, the foreign ministry said he was banned for spending five days in the country, from 22 to 26 November, without a valid visa.This dubious explanation was a long time coming. A Russian diplomat in Kiev already told him on 25 December that he would not be able to return because his presence in Russia had been deemed “undesirable.”“We are shocked by the disproportion between Satter’s alleged offence and the punishment, especially as the offence seems to have been the result of the foreign ministry’s own delay in giving him a document,” Reporters Without Borders said.“Like other foreign reporters who have been expelled in recent years, Satter is known for being very critical of the Putin regime. This just reinforces the impression that this ban is linked to his activities as a journalist.“This violation of freedom of information sends a bad signal to the international media just a weeks before the Sochi Winter Olympics. We urge the Russian authorities to rescind this ban and to allow Satter, whose entire career has been linked to Russia, to go back to work.”A former Financial Times correspondent in Moscow, Satter has written several political books about contemporary Russia in which he is very critical of the Kremlin. An abridged version of his 2003 book about Vladimir Putin’s rise to power, entitled “Darkness at Dawn: The Rise of the Russian Criminal State,” was published in Russia in February 2013. After last month’s Volgograd bombings, he described the Sochi region as a “war zone.”Satter returned to Moscow on a business visa in September with the intention of being based there as an adviser to Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. As soon as be obtained his official press accreditation in early November, he set about getting his business visa replaced by a journalist visa that would allow him an extended stay.According to his detailed explanations, the invitation that the foreign ministry had promised to give him on 22 November, which would have allowed him to obtain a visa the same day, was in fact not given to him until four days later, after his existing visa had expired.As a result, he was refused a visa, fined and forced to leave Russia to begin a new visa application from scratch in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev. Three weeks later, on 25 December, after being told that his visa had been approved, a diplomat at the Russia embassy in Kiev finally read him a statement that said: “The competent organs have decided that your presence on the territory of the Russian Federation is undesirable.”Despite requests from the US authorities, the Russian foreign ministry provided no explanation until its terse statement of 14 January. Satter recognizes that he overstayed, but blames the Russian authorities and accuses them of engineering a pretext to prevent him from continuing to work in Russia.Although Satter is the first US journalist to be banned from Russia since the end of the Cold War, other foreign reporters critical of the Kremlin have been similarly treated in recent years.The Guardian’s Moscow correspondent, British journalist Luke Harding, was expelled in 2011. Natalia Morar, a Moldovan journalist working in Moscow for the Russian opposition weekly The New Times, was declared persona non grata in 2007. Two Dutch journalists, photographer Rob Hornstra and filmmaker Arnold van Bruggen, the authors of “The Sochi Project,” were denied entry in September.But even the most critical foreign journalists are relatively protected compared with their Russian counterparts, who are subject to judicial harassment leading in some cases to long spells in prison.Russia is ranked 148th out of 179 countries in the 2013 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.(Photos : Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty) Follow the news on Russia News January 16, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Another outspoken foreign journalist expelled, banned for five years May 21, 2021 Find out more RSF_en center_img News Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Organisation June 2, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information RussiaEurope – Central Asia Listed as a “foreign agent”, Russia’s most popular independent website risks disappearing Two Russian journalists persecuted for investigating police corruption May 5, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, Jan. 24

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionTonko not looking out for girls’ safetyIn Decatur, Georgia, a kindergarten girl went to use the girls’ bathroom. A boy followed her into the bathroom, pushed her against the wall, and sexually assaulted her. The public school defended the boy saying he could use the girls’ bathroom because he identified as female. The public school ignored parents’ complaints and continued to allow the boy to use the girls’ bathroom.What happened to that little girl in Georgia can happen here. Recently, a 17-year-old girl from Brooklyn was attacked in a library bathroom.Males following females into bathrooms with intent to rape is common. Policies championed by Congressman Paul Tonko allow biological males to use the girls’ bathroom. Tonko elevates the desires of a few over the safety of girls. He even calls safety measures to protect girls “bigoted.”In reality, Tonko’s the one who’s bigoted towards girls. His policy opens the door to pedophiles and perverts. He doesn’t care that little girls can’t defend themselves. He tells parents too bad … so sad.Moms who care about the safety of women and children want Tonko out of office. We will vote for a woman who values our children’s safety, and her name is Liz Lemery-Joy.Jennifer RichardsBurnt HillsLowering OT would mean adding officersUnless you are saying that city legislators and the executive should add police officers, your Jan. 17 editorial (“City must get a grip on police OT“) on police overtime misses the point: There is precious little overtime if you have sufficient staff; with enough police officers, detectives and specialized unit officers you can limit much of the overtime to emergency situations.Every year we see editorials castigating officers for the long hours they put in and the corresponding overtime pay they earn while protecting the public.Clearly the council and mayor have applied a cost-benefit analysis and have decided that paying overtime is better than adding officers. So when you say the city should do something, are you advocating adding officers, which will have short-term costs of education and training, but long-term savings, savings that could save the public and the safety of the men and women who put their lives on the line for us?Bruce S. TrachtenbergNiskayunaThe writer is a former town justice.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayFoss: Schenectady homeless assistance program Street Soldiers dealing with surge in needFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionslast_img read more

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McHUGH RETURNS FOR HARPS AGAINST TABLE-TOPPERS SHELBOURNE

first_imgFinn Harps will have club captain Kevin McHugh available for selection on Friday night as they welcome league leaders Shelbourne to Finn Park (kick-off 8.00pm).Kevin McHugh returns to action for Harps.McHugh has been missing since picking up a hamstring injury in the opening game of the season against Waterford United at Finn Park.However, he came through an hour unscathed in Harps’ Ulster Senior League game against Swilly Rovers last weekend and will be included in the panel for the visit of Shels this weekend. Shels are the runaway leaders of the Division and currently have an eight point advantage at the top of the pile despite the season still being three games away from the half-way mark.While Harps have picked up four points in their last two outings, team manager Ollie Horgan is well aware of the task that faces his side on Friday.“Shelbourne are top of our league by a distance,” said Horgan. “They have great attacking flair in Dylan Connolly, Lee Murtagh and Jordan Keegan while Keith Quinn pulls the strings in the middle of the field for them. Maybe more importantly, defensively they have conceded very few goals. A very difficult game is ahead of us on Friday but we are looking forward to it.”Harps looked like they would record back-to-back away wins in Galway last weekend having beaten Cobh 2-0 a week earlier. However, Paul Sinnott’s injury time goal cancelled out Ruairi Keating’s opener for Harps to give the hosts a share of the spoils. Harps had played for over an hour with just ten men after Caoimhin Bonner was dismissed in the first half. “It was a great battling performance in Galway,” said Horgan as he reflected on the 1-1 draw. “Although starved of possession at times, especially when we were down to ten men, we worked very hand off the ball and tried to play on the counter attack – it was from a situation like this that Ruairi scored the opening goal for us.“Probably overall a draw was a fair result but when you defend as well as we did for so long it was disappointing to switch off in last minute. The game was very similar to the Galway game in Ballybofey except the roles were reversed where they were a man down then and we equalised late on,” said Horgan.While there is good news on the return of McHugh for Friday, Horgan will have to plan without the suspended Caoimhin Bonner while Ciaran Coll is a doubt after he picked up a knock to the ribs in the game in Galway last weekend.Harps have a poor recent record against Shelbourne, and haven’t beaten the Dublin side since 2007. Since then, there have been ten meetings of which two have finished in draws, with Shelbourne winning the other eight.  McHUGH RETURNS FOR HARPS AGAINST TABLE-TOPPERS SHELBOURNE was last modified: May 22nd, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:finn harpsKevin McHughShelbournelast_img read more

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Dave Kaval says A’s still need key Coliseum info from city

first_imgOAKLAND — The Oakland A’s are surging on the field and eyeing the playoffs for the first time in five years — perfect timing for the team to announce where it will build its new ballpark.As October baseball nears, however, the team is no closer to deciding whether that new stadium will rise at the site of the club’s current home, the city- and county-owned Coliseum, or at the Howard Terminal, owned by the Port of Oakland.The team is pursuing stadium developments at both locations, but A’s …last_img

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Inside the Warriors’ emotional night processing KD’s injury

first_imgTORONTO – The tears filled their eyes.Kevin Durant became emotional when he felt pain in what the team later fears to be a torn right Achilles tendon. And when he walked out of the arena with crutches and a walking boot. And when he processed the Warriors’ 106-105 win over the Toronto Raptors in Game 5 of the NBA Finals on Monday, an outcome that closed the series to 3-2 and ensured a Game 6 in what will be the final game … Click here if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device.last_img

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Make Google Search Real-Time With This URL Hack

first_imgGoogle web search results can be limited by timeframe using the “search options” link on every page, but one startup company CEO discovered today that searches can also be limited to results indexed minutes or seconds ago by making a simple change to the search results page URL.Startup search engine Omgili’s CEO Ran Geva wrote on his company blog today that time-limited search results pages include a parameter called QDR – perhaps standing for Query Date Range. You can change the number following the letters qdr and change the timeframe for your search. By default when you click on “search options” and limit a search to the last day, the qdr appears as “d.” Change that to “n” and you’ll be limited to results from the last minute, to “n10” and you’ll see results discovered in the last 10 minutes – or “s30” to see results from the last 30 seconds. It couldn’t be simpler. Here’s a sample search for Portland Oregon Coffee with the search options already turned on. Geva isn’t the first person to discover this, but he’s the first we’ve seen place it within the context of real-time search and we didn’t know about it until reading his blog post.What does it mean? We’re not sure yet. We did notice, though, that a Twitter search for the word “pirates” brings back 2 results in the last minute – and Google brings back 9. Results for many queries, limited to just the last few minutes, are fairly interesting.Google co-founder Larry Page famously said of real time search back in May “we have to do it.” If more granular controls were surfaced, would you use them? I’ve bookmarked a search within the last 60 minutes – we’ll see how that compares with other efforts like placing Twitter search results on top of Google pages. At the very least we can say good job finding this, Ran Geva! marshall kirkpatrick A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Tags:#Real-Time Web#search#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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California Poised to Require Solar Panels

first_img RELATED ARTICLES To Net Zero and Beyond The Department of Energy Chooses a Definition for Net ZeroBuilding a Low-Cost Zero-Energy HomeRevisiting Net Zero Energy The California Energy Commission is expected to approve the new rule when it votes this week, making California the first state in the country to require that new houses come with photovoltaic panels.“California is about to take a quantum leap in energy standards,” Bob Raymer, technical director for the California Building Industry Association, told The Mercury-News. “No other state in the nation mandates solar, and we are about to take that leap.”Assuming the proposal is approved, single-family houses, condos and apartment buildings of three stories or less permitted after Jan. 1, 2020 would have to include solar panels. Currently, between 15% and 20% of new single-family homes are equipped with solar.Amber Beck, a spokeswoman for the Energy Commission, said by telephone the solar panel provision is part of a regular update of the Building Energy Efficiency Standards, also called Title 24, that also will toughen requirements for insulation and indoor air quality. She said the rated capacity of the panels would be tied to the size of the house, with a single-family home getting a system of between 2.5 kW and 4 kW on average.center_img Builders, however, would be able to lower the size of the array by including other efficiency features in the house.A decade ago, the commission adopted a goal of making all new houses capable of operating at zero-net energy after 2020 (it is on the books as an objective, not a legal requirement), but one of five commissioners who will be voting on Wednesday said that doesn’t go far enough. “Zero net energy isn’t enough,” said Andrew McAllister.Exceptions in the new policy would cover houses that are shaded by trees or buildings as well as houses whose roofs are too small to accommodate panels. Builders who install batteries would get compliance credits allowing them to reduce the capacity of the solar arrays. Other provisions will encourage wider use of electricity to reduce the consumption of natural gas.C.R. Herro, vice president of environmental affairs for Meritage Homes, said the revised energy standards would add between $25,000 and $30,000 to the cost of a new house — between $14,000 and $16,000 of that in solar, and the balance in upgrades to windows, appliances, lighting and heating. However, homeowners would see savings of between $50,000 and $60,000 over the 25-year life of their solar panels.Environmentalists were pleased with the prospect for wider adoption of solar, but at least one builder was not. Bill Watt, a homebuilder and design consultant, said the new energy provisions on top of other state building requirements are making houses too expensive in a state that already has a housing shortage.“We’re not building enough housing already,” said Watt, former president of the Orange County Building Industry Association. “Why not just pause for a little while, focus on the affordability and housing issues, then circle back?”The states’s energy code is updated every three years.last_img read more

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Unmukt shines as India U-19 beat Aus, lift World Cup for the 3rd time

first_imgIndia win by 6 wickets and are the ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup Champions, the Indian players rush onto the field and they are very much excited and so are the fans. Chand is draped with the Indian flag, who has played an excellent knock. Score | PhotosUnmukt Chand led from the front with a magnificent hundred as India Under-19 lifted their third World Cup title after beating formidable defending champions Australia by six wickets in the final in Townsville on Sunday. This was India U-19s first triumph after Mohammed Kaif and Virat Kohli led their respective teams to victory in 2000 and 2008 editions respectively.Courtesy a magnificent unbeaten 111 by Unmukt and his unbroken partnership of 130 runs with glovesman Smit Patel, India overhauled a competitive target of 226 on a bouncy strip with 14 balls to spare.It was one of the best centuries one could have witnessed at the junior level as Unmukt hit seven fours and as many as six sixes during his 130-ball knock.He completed his century with a six over extra cover off Alex Gregory but the celebrations were very muted. The skipper knew that the job was only half done.Once Smit, who hit an effective 62, slog-swept off-spinner Ashton Turner towards deep mid-wicket for a four a number of Indian supporters rushed to the ground along to celebrate with the team.Though four wickets were lost in the chase, it never looked like an uphill task for the Indians, who were subdued in the middle overs but accelerated towards the end to get to the target with ease.advertisementAfter Prashant Chopra was out chasing a delivery down leg side of Mark Steketee without troubling the scorers, Unmukt and in-form batsman Baba Aparajith (33) took the attack to the opposition.Sandeep Sharma (L) and captain Unmukt Chand celebrate the wicket of James Peirson. (Photo courtesy ICC)The duo added 73 runs for the second wicket playing the Aussie pace trio of Steketee, Joel Paris and Gurinder Sandhu with ease.Unmukt, especially, was phenomenal in the closing stages hitting a couple of glorious sixes off Sandhu’s bowling.The first was over long-off while second looked even more spectacular as he presented a full face of the bat with a nice follow through.Aparajith on the other hand hit a nice hook shot off Paris and some lovely cover drives that pierced the field.However, Sandhu had the last laugh when he forced Aparajith to drive on the up and was brilliantly caught by Ashton Turner at short cover.The Tamil Nadu all-rounder scored 33 off 38 balls with five hits to the fence. Hanuma Vihari (4) and Vijay Zol (1) didn’t score much but some damage was done by the number of deliveries that were consumed in the process.Zol’s discomfort against the moving deliveries also frustrated Unmukt who didn’t get much of the strike. The Indian captain finally completed his half century in 68 deliveries.Zol’s agony ended as he edged one off Paris to wicketkeeper Jimmy Peirson. The Bowling Powerplay proved to be useful for the hosts as they conceded only 11 runs in the five overs.At 97 for four, Smit Patel joined Unmukt and the circumstances were difficult. The boundaries dried up and so did the singles.It was Smit, who hit fine straight drives as India got their first boundary after 44 deliveries.Slowly, the two resurrected the innings with singles and twos. There were the occasional boundaries but only a few compared to the flurry of fours that Unmukt and Aparajith hit in first 15 overs.Earlier, India frittered away the early advantage as defending champions Australia recovered from a shaky start to post a competitive 225 for 8.Electing to field after winning the toss Indians had the Aussies on the mat at 38 for 4 before host skipper William Bosisto (87 not out) rebuilt the innings with the help of some notable contributions down the order from Tavis Head (37) and Ashton Turner.Colts ‘veteran’ Sandeep Sharma who got four for 54 was the most successful bowler.Both teams named the same XIs that had got them through the knockouts. While Australia, aiming for a fourth title, entered the final undefeated, India had lost one game in the first group stage to the West Indies.last_img read more

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Standardisation to Drive Shippings Digital Transformation

first_imgzoom Standardisation can enable the effective collection, storage, exchange, analysis and use of data, while contributing to improved data quality and sensor reliability in the maritime industry, a new paper by classification society DNV GL shows.The position paper sets out the importance of standardisation in enabling the growth of digital applications in the maritime industry.Whether for operational optimization, model calibration for digital twins, design optimization or other applications, the maritime industry is exploring the opportunities offered by digital technologies. The first demonstration and pilot projects are already well underway and the industry is asking what is needed to transform these into fully scalable products. The answer could be a greater emphasis on standardisation.“Standards are used in many industries to advance efficiency, safety and environmental performance,” Pierre Sames, Group Technology and Research Director, DNV GL, said.“With the rise of the Internet of Things in shipping, we believe that many stakeholders can benefit from developing a standardisation strategy to take advantage of a more digital maritime industry,” Sames added.DNV GL’s new position paper discusses the need for standardisation in six key areas: Ship data models, sensor naming and referencing, maritime taxonomies and code books, sensor metadata, shipboard data recorder, as well as sensor quality and reliability. However, as future technologies develop, there may be a need for new standards to support other applications, such as model-based simulations and autonomous ships.“Standards are a key factor in removing barriers and enabling the growth of digital applications in the maritime industry and we hope this study will inspire others to invest in the development and adoption of standardisation,” Sames concluded.last_img read more

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Leaving home Growing number of NL outports make wrenching choice to resettle

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. – Raymond Blake can still see his mother, a strong woman raising six kids alone after his father died, dissolve into tears as the schooner pulled away from their home in remote southern Newfoundland.It was a Monday in July 1969. They were leaving all they’d ever known in Pushthrough, a tiny fishing settlement of 150 people, for a new start across the water in comparatively modern Hermitage.“The next thing you know, I was crying and my brothers were crying. I didn’t quite know what was really going to happen,” Blake recalled.“I’ll never forget my mother leaving her home.”The same scene of wrenching loss played out countless times through the 1950s and ’60s as communities agreed, as part of a government push to centralize workers and services, to abandon cherished villages for larger places.Resettlement is a word that to this day conjures intense, very mixed emotions in Newfoundland and Labrador.Still, sparsely populated outports, where many argue the heart of this province beats strongest, are emptying at a quickening pace — although not fast enough for those who question government costs.Seven communities with names like Great Harbour Deep and Snook’s Arm have relocated since 2002, including three since 2016. Another three — North Boat Harbour, La Poile and Little Bay Islands — have asked the province to consider moving them.The process is community driven — permanent residents must vote at least 90 per cent to relocate. Municipal Affairs calculates whether it’s cheaper to move them than provide services over 10 to 20 years.If approved, the province offers homeowners $250,000 to $270,000 depending on the size of the household to help them set up elsewhere.Relocating those seven communities has saved government about $30 million so far, said Municipal Affairs Minister Andrew Parsons. And more are considering moving to be closer to health care as the province of just 528,000 people ages, he added.“When you’ve got to get in that boat and go along the coast just to get access to medical appointments, and as you get older you need more and more of those, it just becomes more trying,” Parsons said.“Given the fact that we’ve had three in the last three years, there’s no doubt I think that you’re seeing a greater examination of the possibility (of moving) by these communities, and there are more that have expressed interest.”Many residents hate to leave the places where they were born and raised but also want to be close to children and grandchildren who’ve long ago left.“It’s tough. It’s an emotional process.”Before politics, Parsons was the lawyer who acted for residents in Grand Bruit, meaning “big noise” for the waterfall that cascades down its cliffs, as they resettled eight years ago.“This is a decision that they make but that doesn’t make it a positive one, or one that they’ve relished or enjoyed. It’s one, in many cases, that’s driven by necessity.”Parsons represents the Burgeo-La Poile district in southwestern Newfoundland. He often travels by boat along the isolated coast between Burgeo and Grey River, past the lonely remnants of long deserted outports.“It’s amazing seeing these graveyards that are still there and, in some cases, houses and huts,” he said in an interview.Larry Short, a chartered accountant and investment advisor in St. John’s, says today’s resettlement incentives are a “Band-Aid solution.”Provincial finances were hammered when the price of oil crashed in 2014. It now has a daunting overspending problem as net debt hits historic levels. Yet, Short says there’s a glaring lack of will to right-size government budgets.“Nobody really wants to talk about it because the political cost is too high,” he said in an interview. “I’d much rather that the province addressed it before the mainland bankers close in.”Short is among those calling for tough decisions about what services government can afford, along with more tangible plans to attract and keep young workers in the province.It’s an emotionally fraught but crucial and overdue conversation, he said.Blake knows better than most the complexities of resettlement.Moving to Hermitage wasn’t all bad, he said. There was better schooling and running water.“The flush toilet was something that I was fascinated with.”But resettlement for his family and many others — even with some government financial help — was traumatizing, he said. He and his brother have written to the premier and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asking for an apology.“Communities did have to agree and there was compensation but it really wasn’t a choice at all. Many had to go because everyone else was going.“It’s a story about a generation.”Follow @suebailey on Twitter.last_img read more

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