Union withdraws petition, drops charges against Roski

first_img“What this means for Roski and all other schools, is that Academic Senate, faculty committees and faculty councils remain free to work with administration on compensation, benefits and terms of employment,” Quick wrote in a letter to USC faculty. “Faculty can continue to speak for themselves on these topics, without having to get union permission.” Roski’s decision to withdraw representation follows a March D.C. appeals court ruling that decided non-tenured faculty at USC cannot form unions. Under the March ruling in the National Labor Relations Board v. USC case, non-tenured faculty positions are considered managerial positions. Previously,  a decision by the NLRB in 2015 said full- and part-time non-tenure track Roski employees had the right to form a union with SEIU, despite University protest. The Service Employees International Union Local 721 has withdrawn its petition to represent Roski School of Art and Design faculty, Provost Michael Quick announced June 19. The SEIU will also drop pending charges against USC regarding unfair labor practices. “After the January 2016 vote to have the SEIU be the exclusive bargaining representative of the English language teachers there, the union and USC have bargained in good faith but have not reached agreement on a contract,” Quick wrote. “We remain at impasse.” “Working with the Academic Senate, we have made important progress on salaries and employment conditions for both full-time and part-time faculty,” Quick wrote. “All USC faculty, tenured and [Research, Teaching, Practice and Clinical Faculty,] have representatives who play a vital role in making important decisions about our University. This will continue under President Carol Folt.” According to Quick, USC has yet to reach an agreement with SEIU over the International Academy. The University has made significant progress since 2016, Quick wrote. In 2016, eligible Roski faculty voted to join SEIU Local 721 along with faculty from the International Academy following complaints of low wages and few benefits. Faculty from Dornsife College of Arts and Sciences also voted but failed to unionize. Daily Trojan file photolast_img read more

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Next for Raiders: Rally king Rivers, Chargers, who burned 49ers

first_imgWhen it comes to Philip Rivers and the Los Angeles Chargers, the Raiders can feel the pain the 49ers felt Sunday.With Rivers throwing three touchdown passes, the Chargers rallied past the 49ers 29-27 at the Stub Hub Center. Oakland, which plays in L.A. next week, has seen this side of Rivers too many times — the Chargers quarterback has engineered more successful fourth-quarter comebacks against the Raiders (5) than any other team.Caleb Sturgis’ 21-yard field goal beat the 49ers and completed …last_img

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Jamaican Decorative Paints Virtually Lead-Free

first_imgStory Highlights Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Poison Information Coordinator at CarPIN, Sherika Whitelocke-Ballingsingh, said that this was one of the findings of a recent Lead in Paint Study that was conducted by CarPIN in collaboration with international non-governmental organisation (NGO) International Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPS) Elimination Network (IPEN). The Caribbean Poison Information Network (CarPIN) is reporting that Jamaican decorative paints have been found to be virtually lead-free.center_img The Caribbean Poison Information Network (CarPIN) is reporting that Jamaican decorative paints have been found to be virtually lead-free.Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Poison Information Coordinator at CarPIN, Sherika Whitelocke-Ballingsingh, said that this was one of the findings of a recent Lead in Paint Study that was conducted by CarPIN in collaboration with international non-governmental organisation (NGO) International Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPS) Elimination Network (IPEN).“Nearly all paints in a new study that we conducted between July and September of this year, analysing lead in solvent-based paints in Jamaica, had lead content below 90 parts per million (90ppm),” she said.This, she said, is the maximum allowable limit on lead in paint in the United States of America (USA) and Canada.According to Mrs. Whitelocke-Ballingsingh, the study revealed that there are safe and viable alternatives for leaded paint, which are already in use and widely available in Jamaica.She noted that of the 36 paint brands analysed, one brand of yellow automotive industrial paint that is imported into the island from the USA was found to contain 1,500 times the maximum allowable limit on lead paint in the USA and Canada.Global Lead Paint Elimination Campaign Manager at IPEN, Dr. Sara Brosche, emphasised the correlation of lead paint and childhood poisoning and warned that failure to enforce strong regulatory controls could prove disastrous.“Lead paint is a major source of childhood lead poisoning and there are no safe levels. We are, therefore, advocating for the elimination of this dangerous source of childhood lead exposure,” she said.She pointed to the need for strong regulatory and import controls on lead in all types of paint including decorative, architectural and industrial paints.Samples from 36 cans of paint representing 15 brands of solvent-based paint intended for home use in Jamaica were analysed by an accredited laboratory in the USA for total lead content.The brands were produced by seven Jamaican manufacturers, and one each from Trinidad and the USA.Of the 36 paint samples, 31 were decorative household paints, four were anti-corrosive and one was an automotive industrial paint.last_img read more

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Womens swimming Lindsey Clary takes home Big Ten title in 400 IM

Ohio State then-junior swimmer Lindsey Clary competes at the Big Ten championships in February, 2016. Credit: OSU AthleticsSenior Lindsey Clary captured a Big Ten championship title in the 400-yard individual medley for the second consecutive year and her third individual Big Ten title of her career. Clary won the event with a time of 4:04.09, dropping two seconds off her time in the preliminaries to seal the championship. Junior Liz Li had another stellar turnout on Friday after taking home a Big Ten title the previous day. Li placed second overall in the 100-yard butterfly with a time 50.90, breaking her own OSU record. The final day of competition continues tomorrow with preliminaries beginning at 11 a.m. and finals kicking off at 6:30 p.m., again. Fans will be able to watch the 1,650-yard freestyle, 200-yard backstroke, 100-yard freestyle, 200-yard breaststroke, 200-yard butterfly, platform diving, and 400-yard freestyle relay. The Buckeyes remained in fifth place through Friday’s competition — behind Michigan, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin respectively. Li also contributed to another OSU record Friday, alongside teammates sophomore Maria Coy, junior Macie McNichols and junior Cheyenne Meek. The foursome combined for a new OSU record of 1:27.99 in the 200-yard freestyle relay, earning the Buckeyes a second-place finish, as well as an automatic bid to the NCAA championships. The Buckeyes had four top-10 finishers in the 400-yard individual medley, while no other school had more than one. In addition to Clary’s triumph, junior Meg Bailey and freshman Kathrin Demler finished in the top five with times of 4:08.35 and 4:09.75 respectively, and freshman Molly Kowal finished 10th with a time of 4:12.64. The success of these four made this the strongest event for the Buckeyes so far this weekend. read more

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Mens Basketball Keita BatesDiop leaves lasting legacy as first star of Holtmann

Ohio State redshirt junior forward Keita Bates-Diop (33) looks to drive in the first half the game against Penn State in the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals on Mar. 2 in Madison Square Garden. Ohio State lost 68-69. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorFour years ago, forward Keita Bates-Diop was preparing to begin his Ohio State career along with a highly touted recruiting class. The second-highest ranked member of the Buckeyes’ class, Bates-Diop came in with lofty expectations along with the other three players that were expected to form the core of a championship contender. They were coming to a team that had just lost in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, but had just made it to six straight tournament appearances.But, on Monday, as the redshirt junior forward sat at the table in the media room of the Schottenstein Center announcing he would leave the team early for the NBA draft, he reflected a tumultuous time in Columbus. One that began with promise, stalled out and returned to prominence in what became his final season in scarlet and gray. Though that 2014 recruiting class never came all that close to leading Ohio State to a championship, it laid the foundation for a strong program in the beginning of the Chris Holtmann era at Ohio State.“I think that’s the best feeling and kind of one of the best parts about all this,” Bates-Diop said. “Because like I said the last couple years have been down for Ohio State basketball and to do what we did and what I did individually and to kind of leave on that note is a bittersweet feeling, but it’s probably the best way to go.”The class itself each had members go in varying directions. Dave Bell transferred after his redshirt sophomore season at Ohio State, D’Angelo Russell left after one season to become the second pick in the 2015 NBA Draft and both Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate stuck around for four years.Tate was always a consistent presence for Ohio State. He never became a star for Ohio State, but he remained a steady leader for the team.Bates-Diop was not necessarily that player. He was the 29th-best player in the class, but struggled in his first season before beginning to flash his tools in the sophomore season.Right when people began to view him as a potential breakout candidate, he fractured his leg and didn’t to return to action. Instead of playing through the injury, he opted to undergo surgery and take a medical redshirt for the season.In hindsight, that was the best decision he made during his time at Ohio State.“I could’ve played through it, but I don’t think I would be here today if I had,” Bates-Diop said.Holtmann said coaches talked with him before the season about how Bates-Diop had the tools to become a standout player for the team. The only questions they had were in regard to his motor and his toughness.But as soon as Holtmann had time to work with him, he said he could tell Bates-Diop had a strong enough work ethic and desire to improve in order to turn himself into a great player. Even with the potential Bates-Diop had shown, the hype was no longer surrounding him three years after he began his Buckeye career, especially coming off a season-ending injury. If there was any narrative around Bates-Diop heading into his redshirt junior season, it was that he would be counted on by a brand new coaching staff to provide solid production in the hopes of keeping the team afloat in the Big Ten.Instead, he became a star for the team, claiming the Big Ten Player of the Year honors after averaging 19.8 points, 8.7 rebounds and 1.6 assists per game. Though still not becoming the vocal leader in the locker room that Tate was, Bates-Diop led the Buckeyes by example and was the star Holtmann needed in his first season to prove to potential recruits he can maximize a player’s talents.“He developed, and I think hopefully he feels like that we helped him get there and whatever we can do that,” Holtmann said. “That’s something that sure is good that we can communicate to recruits and say look at what Keita and JT, look at how they were developed in just the one year that we had with them. He’ll be a good example for that in recruiting.”Tate and Bates-Diop, the final two members of the 2014 class, will depart Ohio State both having gone through some ups and downs for the program. Both played key roles in helping turn what could have been a rebuilding process into a quick rebound and lay the foundation for Holtmann to build upon.“The good ones here that we recruit as a coaching staff will all realize that they stand on the shoulders of those really good players that came before,” Holtmann said. “And I think he realized that and so did JT, and that’s why I think they felt an obligation in a lot of ways to kind of put this to make the program relevant again.“They stand on the shoulders of all those guys that have done it so well before them. So what he now can leave here, he can now leave here knowing that he did that.” read more

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Baseball Pouelsen and Lopez lift Hawaii over Ohio State in 153 win

After a ground ball up the middle resulted in a force out at second, runners were on the corners with one out in the fourth inning for the Rainbow Warriors. Redshirt sophomore first baseman Alex Baeza was able to knock in Hawaii’s seventh run of the game with a single ripped to centerfield. Lopez was able to clear the bases on a three-run home run lifted over the left field wall. The second four-run inning of the game for the Rainbow Warriors made the score 10-1. With runners on second and third with one down in the fifth, a ground out followed by an infield single allowed Hawaii to scratch across two more runs. This marked the fourth straight inning of two or more runs scored by the Rainbow Warriors. Singles from freshman third baseman Nick Erwin and Canzone began the bottom of the sixth inning for Ohio State. With one out, senior left fielder Brady Cherry’s RBI by way of a sacrifice fly to right field was able to end Hawaii’s unanswered run streak of 12. After a leadoff single by Duarte opened the seventh inning, Yamazaki recorded his third hit of the game and put runners on first and third with no outs. A sacrifice fly from Best and a wild pitch would bring across a pair of runs for Hawaii. Ohio State showed its most life on offense all day when the team loaded the bases with one down in the bottom of the ninth inning. Senior catcher Andrew Fishel was able to lift a flyball to left field to bring in Ohio State’s third and final run of the contest. “We need to bounce back and have a good, quality game on Wednesday and roll that into conference play,” Beals said. The Buckeyes will return to the field at 6:35 p.m. Wednesday against Toledo. Ohio State junior infielder Conner Pohl (39) dives to third base during the game against Hawaii on March 23. Ohio State won 7-5. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorHawaii did something on Sunday that it was unable to do in the previous three games of the series: limit Ohio State’s potent offense. The Buckeyes had scored six or more runs in every game of its five-game win streak, but a season-best performance from Hawaii junior pitcher Logan Pouelsen brought the scoring streak and win streak to an end. Ohio State (13-11) was overwhelmed 15-3 by Hawaii (10-14). Behind 19 hits, including a three-RBI game from senior third baseman Ethan Lopez, the Rainbow Warriors were able to support the team’s best pitching of the series. “The backside hits they got seemed to find holes,” head coach Greg Beals said. “I think it was just their day.” Pouelsen came into the game with a season-long outing of three innings in his only start of the season.He eclipsed that performance in his seven-inning start against Ohio State. The junior allowed only four hits and two earned runs against an Ohio State offense that had excelled at home. Ohio State freshman pitcher Will Pfennig’s first collegiate start was spoiled by Hawaii’s hitting barrage. Lopez earned all three of his RBIs on a three-run home run in the top of the fourth inning, blasing an 0-1 pitch over the left field wall to make the score 10-1. Ohio State shuffled through three freshman pitchers throughout the course of the game. Pfennig was followed by freshman pitcher Mitch Milheim, who allowed six runs in two innings. The final freshman to visit the mound was freshman pitcher TJ Brock, who surrendered four runs in 2.2 innings.Within their struggles, lessons were learned, according to Beals. “I think they learned that pitch quality is got to be better,” Beals said. After falling behind 0-2 in the count, junior right fielder Dominic Canzone fought back to earn a walk to start off the first inning for the Buckeyes. This extended Canzone’s on-base streak to 20 games, the longest of his career.Canzone was able to successfully steal second base, and a throwing error on the throw down to second allowed him to advance to third. Redshirt junior second baseman Matt Carpenter was able to hit an RBI single up the middle to open up the scoring. After a double off the wall and a successful bunt, the Rainbow Warriors had runners on the corners with no outs in the second inning. A hard grounder by freshman second baseman Dallas Duarte to second base resulted in a double play, but Hawaii was able to bring home the tying run. A pair of two-out walks allowed Hawaii to threaten again, and freshman right fielder Tyler Best was able to provide an RBI single on the first pitch from Pfennig. A throwing error on a pickoff attempt allowed another run to score and a runner to advance to third. Hawaii would score their fourth run of the inning after a hard hit to freshman shortstop Zach Dezenzo could not be fielded to end the inning. Pfennig would end his first collegiate start after just two innings. The freshman allowed four runs and struck out one batter. After a fielding error put the leadoff man on, a two-out double by Duarte pushed the score to 5-1. Senior shortstop Maaki Yamazaki ripped a single up the middle to bring in Duarte and extend Hawaii’s lead to five runs going into the home half of the third inning. read more

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Showcasing the best of Bali

first_imgBali resembles India in terms of culture as they have 95 per cent Hindu population but to know more about them, one has to visit the country and its exotic locations. For those who wish to know more about the culture, one can look at the photographs that will be showcased in an exhibition in the national Capital. The exhibition titled- ‘Women In Bali,’ which will begin on April 26, contains series of photographs that attempt to make a comparison of the role of women in India and Bali— two nations permeated by the same religious traditions. It also aims to reflect on the opportunity present for the women in society. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The narration of the exhibition flows through a kaleidoscope of women, immersed in their natural environment, in everyday life or portrayed in composite form. The images talk about an intertwining of existences that gradually expresses female role-play, a cultural pluralism, spiritual intensity and the importance of nature. Some of the images are imbued with a feeling of sacredness. The woman bowing her head in deep respect under a cascade of silver, the subject holding out her hand as crystal clear water gushes over it- which puts into focus the woman engaged in tending to an inundated rice field, juxtaposing not just the various roles of water but of the women as well. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixElaborating more about her work, Bruna says, “The exhibition and the book seek to be homage to the island and all the women who live there. Over time, I have met many women, both from Bali and elsewhere, who have launched important artistic, ethical and social projects on the island. Through their portraits I have tried to grasp their essence, describing the force of the female energy symbolised by water, the holy water, a vehicle of ancient memories and an instrument of healing.” “Bali is a living island, a place that has always stirred in me contrasting emotions, stimulated by its fluid and changeable light, by a rituality made up of gestures that render the invisible visible and, above all, by a diffuse beauty that reflects a harmony that is continually reinvented”, adds Bruna Rotunno. The soundtrack for the exhibition has been composed by Eraldo Bernocchi, an Italian musician, producer and sound designer. The exhibition has been curated by Singapore based art consultant Sabiana Paoli in association with art historian Dr Alka Pande. Speaking about the artist’s work, Sabiana shares, “Bruna Rotunno’s affair with the island of Bali started 30 years ago, when she visited the islands for the first time. In a project spanning eight years, she has organised her gaze into a story in pictures where every gesture and every figure meticulously translates the essence of a unique place, characterised by a fluid and harmonious energy.”‘Women In Bali’ reflects the twin worlds of advertising and fashion through the pictures. The portraits of women pursue the mundane appear like finely finished stylish fashion pictures.last_img read more

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