Jenkins calls on White House to end family separations at border

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins condemned the Trump administration’s policy of separating families at the Mexican border as “cruel” in a statement Tuesday.“Central to the Holy Cross education Notre Dame offers is a sense of family, centered on the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, and in that spirit I call on the administration to end immediately the cruel practice of separating children from parents and parents from children,” he said in the statement.The practice stems from a “zero-tolerance policy” the Department of Justice announced April 6, which requires the prosecution of everyone who attempts to cross the border illegally. However, the department cannot prosecute any children detained at the border with their parents. As a result, those children are separated from their families while their parents face prosecution.The White House has been inconsistent in its reasoning for the practice. On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions cited the Bible as justification for it. Later that day, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said it is “very biblical to enforce the law.”In a series of tweets Monday morning, President Donald Trump attempted to shift blame for the policy onto Democrats, writing that it is the party’s “fault for being weak and ineffective with Boarder [sic] Security and Crime. Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration. Change the laws!”Jenkins joins both Democrats and Republicans — including former First Lady Laura Bush — and Catholic leaders such as Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, in condemning the practice and calling for an end to it.Tags: border separations, Donald Trump, Immigration, Jenkins, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Biden challenges Trump with ‘Buy American’ plan

first_imgThe Trump campaign responded that the plan would inflict “catastrophe”. Joe Biden lambasts US President Donald Trump, arguing he failed to deliver on his economic promises. GETTY IMAGES “Time and again, working families are paying the price for this administration’s incompetence,” Biden said. WASHINGTON – Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden has laid out his rescue plan for the coronavirus-crippled US economy, while berating President Donald Trump as incompetent. Speaking at a metalworks firm near his childhood hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania, on Thursday, Biden said the President’s failures had “come with a terrible human cost and a deep economic toll”. Many voters are concerned by the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic. His divisive approach to the country’s recent wave of anti-racism protests has also come under sharp scrutiny. (BBC)center_img The “Build Back Better” agenda, he said, would spur a manufacturing and technology jobs boom. Biden is all but guaranteed to face off with Trump in this November’s presidential election. November’s election is expected to be dominated by the coronavirus pandemic and its economic fallout, which has pushed tens of millions of Americans into unemployment. More than 130,000 people have died with the virus. Biden said his $700-billion plan would be the biggest investment in the US economy since World War 2.last_img read more

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Beat writers split on outcome of Syracuse-Duke

first_imgSyracuse’s five-game winning streak came to an end on Tuesday night in Clemson, South Carolina. Clyde Trapp cut around Jesse Edwards with two seconds left for the game-winning layup in the Orange’s 71-70 loss to the Tigers. Next up for Syracuse (13-8, 6-4 Atlantic Coast) is a game against Duke in the Carrier Dome on Saturday, and the Blue Devils (17-3, 7-2) enter as winners of their last two games. Vernon Carey leads Duke with a 17.4 points-per-game average, one of four Blue Devil starters averaging double-digits.Here’s what The Daily Orange beat writers think will happen on Saturday.Nick Alvarez (14-7)I’m Blue (Da ba dee)Duke 80, Syracuse 68After finding ways to win games, Syracuse reverted against Clemson, finally finding a way to lose one down the stretch. Now comes Duke, an almost-rivalry for everyone wearing Orange, and a nuisance for those dawned in blue and white. While an upset pick isn’t as far-fetched as it would’ve been a few weeks ago, SU is probably a historic shooting performance away from triggering a court-storming. Not only is this Blue Devils team likely en route to a Final Four, but Clemson’s Tevin Mack showed a template for what Duke’s Vernon Carey can and will do in the Carrier Dome on Saturday night. When we discussed the Orange’s season-long issues at center, I tabbed Carey as the one player who’d exploit it in full. He’s the star power that’ll pack the Dome and the main reason Duke walks away with a win.Michael McCleary (14-7)BedeviledSyracuse 77, Duke 76AdvertisementThis is placeholder textI had been saying all week that if Syracuse rolls into this game with a six-game win streak, it would be hard to pick against them. The Orange went to Clemson, snapped their winning streak and made several mistakes down the stretch of a game that they should have won. But they’re still hard to pick against. SU didn’t have its two best big men on the floor for the final eight minutes of the game, with Marek Dolezaj fouling out and then Bourama Sidibe. Syracuse looked good enough for stretches to justify making this pick. SU at its best is one of the best teams in the ACC. Another win in this storied rivalry will prove it. Josh Schafer (14-7)So, is this a rivalry game?Duke 78 Syracuse 69Syracuse was rolling prior to Tuesday night’s loss and probably wouldn’t have had its five-game winning streak ruined had the Orange not been in foul trouble. But Saturday will be a different animal. Duke is the best team Syracuse has played all year, and the efficiency of the Blue Devils will outlast Syracuse. With a short bench, SU learned on Tuesday how foul trouble can put it in an unrecoverable position. The same can be said with SU wearing down against Duke and not having the fresh legs to reach to for a few minutes. The Carrier Dome atmosphere should make this a fun one and it can fall either way, but the more Syracuse plays the more it seems like a good team that has flaws. Teams like Duke exploit teams with flaws, and that’s what may decide Saturday’s game. Comments Published on January 29, 2020 at 10:20 pm Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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The Earth Should Have Frozen

first_imgAccording to stellar evolution theory, the earth should have frozen solid four billion years ago, because the young sun could not have put out the heat it does in its middle age.  Called the “faint young sun paradox,” this problem has puzzled scientists for decades.  A new study has failed to solved the puzzle.    Science Now described work by a team at the University of Copenhagen.  They studied minerals in rocks in Greenland thought to be 3.8 billion years old – among the oldest claimed on Earth – for hints of carbon dioxide levels:Too much CO2, and magnetite can’t form, whereas the opposite is true for siderite.  Based on the ratio of the minerals, the team reports in tomorrow’s issue of Nature1 that CO2 levels during the Archean could have been no higher than about 1000 parts per million—about three times the current level of 387 ppm and not high enough to compensate for the weak sun.These “very surprising” results were no comfort to theorists who had hoped that Earth could have avoided a big freeze via greenhouse gases.  Now they are toying with other ideas: less land and bigger oceans, which might have allowed water to absorb more warmth; or early life that reduced the kinds of atmospheric gases that help clouds form, allowing more sunlight to reach the surface.  Their favorite suggestion was that Earth’s albedo (reflectivity) was lower back then, eliminating the need for greenhouse gases to compensate.  Isn’t it amazing, though, how the albedo’s changes were tuned to the sun’s output to keep the temperature stable?The Earth�s surface environment over the approximately 4 billion years (Gyr) recorded in geologic formations appears to have been maintained within a relatively narrow range in which liquid water was stable.  This is surprising because the factors that determine surface temperature have evolved owing to temporal variations of the Sun’s irradiance, the Earth’s albedo and cloud cover, and concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases over geologic time.  It is not readily apparent to what extent this apparent thermostasis can be attributed to physico-chemical feedback mechanisms, metabolic interventions from living organisms, or combinations of unrelated secular changes.The paper by Rosing et al boasted that there is “No climate paradox under the faint early Sun,” but then admitted to quite a few other uncertainties:There is little consensus on when the first continents emerged, or the rate of growth since continental nucleation.There is no simple relationship between the mass of continental material extracted from the mantle and the surface area of exposed land….We have chosen to use the present-day area/volume relationship (Fig. 2a), which probably overestimates the continental area, and in consequence, the albedo for the early Earth.Because the timing and rate of growth of the Earth’s continents is a matter of debate, we have included a scenario in which the surface area occupied by continents is constant over geologic time as one end-member in our model (see Methods).In other words, the temperature compensation works if one makes many ad hoc, arbitrary assumptions about factors or combinations of factors nobody knows anything about.    Others think there is still a need for some greenhouse-induced global warming back then; “Temperatures during the Archean were at least as high as they are today, despite the weaker sun,” claimed James Kasting [Penn State], according to the Science Now article.  Rosing shrugged his shoulders and said, “I think that our paper is just one link in a long chain of further refinements of our understanding of the early Earth and of the dynamics of our planet” – a lot of words meaning clueless. 1.  Rosing, Bird, Sleep, Bjerrum, “No climate paradox under the faint early Sun,” Nature 464, 744-747 (1 April 2010) | doi:10.1038/nature08955.Evolutionary scientists can be such braggarts.  They say they know this, and they know that, but you look at their assumptions and methods, and there is no basis for confidence about any of it.  The only thing that is rock solid in their mushy opinions is unwavering allegiance to Darwin and the billions of years he needed.  Even when it causes insurmountable challenges from other branches of investigation, like stellar evolution, they just chalk it up to future work – a “long chain of further refinements of our understanding.”  Did you see much “understanding” in these articles?  How about letting some others exhibit their understanding without the requirement of allegiance to Darwin.  Look, to have a chain of understanding, you’ve got to have some links – solid links.  A chain of spaghetti-O’s won’t hold much.  This primordial spaghetti-O chain of reasoning needs to be fortified with iron.  It’s so insipid, it’s enough to make a young son faint. (Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Former US president Obama speaks in Toronto fans say they left inspired

first_imgTORONTO – Former U.S. President Barack Obama said Friday that closing borders won’t create future jobs because what’s changing industries like manufacturing are automation and artificial intelligence.Obama told a Toronto luncheon on Friday that the transition from an agricultural to an industrial economy happened over the course of 150 years, but that the technological revolution is happening in 20 years. He said it’s hard for governments to catch up to the pace of disruption.Obama said over the next 25 years, advanced economies will have to confront the fact that there is not going to be enough high-paying full-time work as we traditionally conceive it.“You’ll still see auto companies doing pretty well and you’ll see us manufacturing the goods that we use in the United States or Canada, but you’ll walk through those factories and they’ll be empty because they’ll be run by robots and AI,” Obama said.“The biggest challenge that we face in terms of maintaining good manufacturing jobs in our countries come from automation, and that is going to accelerate.”Friday’s event, which cost $1,000 per plate, was organized by Ottawa-based think-tank Canada 2020.Obama did not mention President Donald Trump by name but said if the strategy is to close off borders, then governments are missing the point. Trump nixed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal and has called the North American Free Trade Agreement the worst trade deal in history and has threatened to withdraw from it.Obama said that policies can make it easier or harder for people to adapt to change. He said unions are important but must recognize the original union model was built in the industrial era and needs to be refreshed in the information age. Obama said things like a higher minimum wage can help cushion the impact of the disruption.He said all advanced economies will have to adapt and find ways in which everybody has a productive, fulfilling life that can support a family. He said young people will need the skills to compete in an economy driven by massive technological change.“The policies we have now can build a runway so that over the next 20 years people are not so angry, so fearful and so stressed that we end up resorting to policies that are not going to be good for anybody,” Obama said.Some of those in the audience found Obama’s talk inspiring as it touched on democracy, civil engagement and youth.“He still has this incredible optimism about Canada, the U.S., the world, in spite of how challenging our times are right now. It’s very good for us to hear that,” Glenda Rissman said.Sharing a similar sentiment, Cynthia Dale said her “first takeaway is how inspiring it was and how ludicrously humble he is. He’s so humble about what he did and what he continues to do.”An American family visiting Toronto waited outside the Metro Toronto Convention Centre for several hours, hoping to catch a glimpse of Obama.Sylvianna and Andrew Kaplan said they are grateful for the Obama administration, especially when it comes to health care. With the threat of an repeal under the Trump administration, anxieties are high for the parents who have two young-adult dependents.“Its (health-care policies) have benefited our children. Both of them are young adults, but they still fall under our health-care plan. The biggest benefit is that they’re still under our insurance,” Sylvianna said.A group of high school students skipped class to see the former president.It was “an experience you can’t get in school,” Abby Mcclellan said.Ava De Pagter said she loves just “what he stands for; everyone should be equal. No matter the race or gender.”Obama was in town just one day after Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state, came to the city to promote her book.The former president was later spotted with Prince Harry at the Invictus Games.— With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Anderson has career night off the bench E Kentucky romps

first_imgRICHMOND, Ky. — Lachlan Anderson scored a career-high 22 points off the bench to lead all scorers and grabbed 14 rebounds as Eastern Kentucky walloped NAIA Midway 107-52 Tuesday night.Anderson was 7 of 12 from the floor and 8 of 9 from the free-throw line, leading five players into double-figure scoring for the Colonels (2-1). Nick Mayo scored 18 points, including three 3-pointers, grabbed nine boards, had four assists, three steals and blocked two shots. Peyton Broughton chipped in 13 points, Jordan Oakley 12 and Jomaru Brown 11.Eastern Kentucky shot 47 per cent from the floor, going 39-of-83, outrebounded the Eagles 57-38 and scored 34 points off 24 Midway turnovers.Mayo scored nine points early, including two from distance, as the Colonels built a 12-0 lead in less than three minutes.Jose Bustamante and Kaleb Britt scored 16 points each for Midway.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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GM union workers call on Trudeau for support at Montreal auto show

first_imgMONTREAL — Unifor’s Quebec director Renaud Gagne is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to follow in Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s footsteps by pledging support for General Motors workers faced with a looming plant closure.Some 300 Unifor members, including about 60 retirees from the now-demolished GM plant in Sainte-Therese, Que., showed their support for Oshawa GM workers on Friday, taking advantage of the Montreal Auto Show now underway.Demonstrators were visible throughout the exhibition. Many wore blue T-shirts with the slogan, “GM to sell here, build here,” and chanted the slogan, “Say-say-say-save GM,” both in French.The General Motors plant in Oshawa, Ont., is slated to shut down at the end of 2019, resulting in an expected 2,600 job losses at the factory.Gagne cited a union-commissioned study that forecasts that by 2025, the closure will have prompted 14,000 job losses in Ontario and 10,000 in the rest of Canada.Gagne noted that some 10,000 people work in the auto parts sector in Quebec.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Grande Prairie man allegedly caught drinking outside liquor store arrested after police

first_imgOfficers pursued the vehicle eastbound on 84th Avenue before it continued southbound on Resources Road, then headed westbound on 68 Avenue. A spike belt was deployed but failed to slow the vehicle. The pursuit continued to the Bear Creek Ball Diamonds where the vehicle lost control and slid into a snowbank.The suspect climbed out of the vehicle’s sunroof and aggressively confronted police. A brief altercation ensued and the suspect was taken into custody. No one was injured during the chase across the city.47 year-old Grande Prairie resident Steven Williams has been charged with 16 Criminal Code offences, including:Obstruct Police Officer x5Impaired Operation of a Motor VehicleImpaired Operation of a Motor Vehicle over 80 mg %Assault on Police OfficerDangerous Operation of a Motor VehicleOperation of a Motor Vehicle while being pursued by PoliceFailure to stop or remainPossession of Scheduled Substance x2Possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose x3Williams is scheduled to appear in court later today. GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. — A Grande Prairie man is facing a number of charges after he was allegedly caught drinking outside a liquor store before leading police on a chase across the Swan City.At around 4:30 p.m. on March 17th, members of the Grande Prairie RCMP responded to a complaint of a man consuming alcohol inside a vehicle parked outside a liquor store near 100 Avenue. Upon arrival, officers attempted to arrest the man, who became violent and managed to drive off. Officers did not give chase.Police say the driver was involved in a collision with a truck near Kateri Drive, but continued to drive erratically through the city. A short time later, police again located the vehicle in a parking lot on the city’s south side. The driver again refused to stop, narrowly avoiding a head-on collision with a police car.last_img read more

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