Bakehouse

first_imgFollowing the launch of its Rusticata bread, Bakehouse (Bagshot, Surrey) has expanded the range with a selection pack of three flavoured bake-off dinner rolls.The rolls were created using the Rusticata dough, which is made with semolina flour, to give a golden colour, and virgin olive oil for extra flavour. The rolls are given a reduced proving time to ensure they stay compact and are baked on the oven floor to enhance the rustic look and flavour.The three varieties are: Petite Baguette (45g), Malted Grain Navette (50g) and Parmesan Pave (40g). Each Rusticata roll has been given a different shape to identify the flavour variants and to give interest in the bread basket.last_img

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viewpoint

first_imgMore bread baiting came at the hands of The Sunday Times this week (and a copycat story in The Times on Monday), which castigated wholemeal bread for nearly doubling levels of sugar over the past 30 years.The nub of the report was that the sugar content in a typical loaf of wholemeal bread rose from 2.1g per 100g in 1978 to 3.7g per 100g in a Hovis wholemeal loaf today. It compared 1978 data, gleaned from McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, with a loaf plucked from the shelf – in this case, Hovis, which uses a small amount of brown sugar.So why is there more sugar in our bread, it asked. Is it added to make loaves more palatable, perhaps compen- sating for cuts in salt urged by the FSA? Perhaps, but what the report failed to note was that sugar is not a common added ingredient in all wholemeal loaves.One plant baker told me that his supermarket loaf contains no added sugar. Despite this, a quick look at the nutrition label showed carbohydrate sugar content similar to the Hovis loaf. So are there labelling inconsistencies? As one scientific expert noted, nothing underhand is going on and “nobody is concealing the addition of sugar in bread”.A sticking point is that ’sugar’ has not been defined in this debate. A whole host of reasons could be behind increasing levels of sugars – from the addition of malt to wheat variety changes having a difference on carbohydrate levels, to the increased use of enzymes, which generate more maltose in the fermentation process, even in no-time doughs. Nutritional analytical techniques have also improved significantly over the past 30 years.Even so, with 100g of wholemeal bread – typically two-and-a-half slices – weighing in at less than a teaspoon of brown sugar, this doesn’t quite compete with a can of Coke (10 teaspoons of refined sugar) for a sugar rush strong enough to get the kids climbing the curtains.Also in the news this week, congratulations are due to the NA’s new chairman, Shirley Ryder, and president, Mike Holling, and to Simon Solway, who has taken over as president of the newly named Alliance for Bakery Students & Trainees (see pgs 6 and 9).last_img read more

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Cost cuts stimulate Grainfarmers’ profits

first_imgGrainfarmers Group, which recently struck a deal with Sainsbury’s to supply its in-store bakeries with fully traceable milling wheat, has reached profitability after paring down staff and transport costs.Chairman Andrew Christie-Miller told British Baker that creating a leaner, more efficient operation and seeking further agreements with “other major end users” was part of “a move towards becoming more of a food business than purely a merchanting business”.The company reported operating profits for the 12 months to July 31, 2007, of £2.1m, compared to losses of £2.6m and £4m in the previous two years. The farmer-owned business’s marketing arm, Grainfarmers PLC, made a £2.6m operating profit. Turnover was £371m.Christie-Miller said that the company had shed 55 employees, reducing the number of staff to 195, as part of a review of costs and had invested heavily in logistics software. It spends around £17m a year on transport.He said the company’s bid to link up with supermarkets and other major grain users would be helped by its network of central stores, which meant that it was well-placed to meet demand and ensure quality. The company recognised that security and continuity of supply are key factors in a volatile market.The two-year deal with Sainsbury’s involves Camgrain, an East Anglian-based farmer-owned cooperative. The wheat is milled by Whitworth Bros.last_img read more

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Fad or fact?

first_imgAs more and more celebrities popularise wheat-free diets, it is not surprising that people find difficulty in having coeliac disease taken seriously when they ask for gluten-free food.The most difficult thing for them is eating out. While there is always a banana in the supermarket, it would be good to have the option of a sandwich, muffin or croissant while out and about on the high street. It’s essential for long-term health that people with coeliac disease stick to the diet and, when you eat out a lot or work away from home, poor availability of foods challenges your ability to do this.Supply and demand, I hear you say… but the demand is out there! Coeliac UK is the leading UK charity that supports and campaigns for people with coeliac disease and we currently have over 80,000 members with over 1,000 new members joining each month.While it is great that food issues come under the media spotlight, it can be confusing to food retailers and producers when the terms ’food intolerance’ and ’food allergy’ are used interchangeably, when in fact they are entirely different things. So, let’s clear that up!Food hypersensitivity is a term used to encompass food allergy and food intolerance. Food intolerance is not triggered by the immune system and is generally non-life-threatening. It may affect digestion, and common symptoms include digestive discomfort, diarrhoea and bloating. Food allergies are generated by the immune system (IgE mediated) and usually occur within seconds or minutes of eating the food in question. Tiny amounts can cause potentially life-threatening allergic reactions.Coeliac disease is not an allergy or simple food intolerance. It is a lifelong, auto-immune disease, generated by the immune system (IgA mediated) affecting the gut and other organs. It is caused by an intolerance to gluten, which is found in the cereals wheat, rye and barley. Some people are also sensitive to pure oats. The only treatment for coeliac disease is a gluten-free diet.There is a clear procedure for diagnosing coeliac disease. This involves an antibody blood test that can be carried out by the GP, followed by a gut biopsy at the hospital. Undiagnosed coeliac disease increases the risk of osteoporosis, bowel cancer and neurological problems, which is why following a gluten-free diet is so vitally important.Dietary management involves avoiding all foods that contain the cereals wheat, barley, rye, oats and ingredients derived from these cereals. While gluten-free ’substitute’ foods, such as bread and pasta, can be obtained from the pharmacy, supermarkets, health food shops, by mail order and via the internet, it can still be hard for people to find products. Gluten-free foods are listed in Coeliac UK’s Food and Drink Directory (available as a hard copy and online) and it is free of charge for manufacturers to list their gluten-free products in the directory.Our annual ’Awareness Week’, from 12-18 May, focuses on the foodservice sector as part of our nationwide ’Food without Fear’ campaign. We’ve produced a brand new ’Catering Toolkit’, which will help anyone in the catering industry learn more about providing gluten-free food.—-=== Keeping your products gluten-free ===Dry gluten-containing ingredients, such as flour and breadcrumbs, are high-risk ingredients for contamination and cross-contamination when you are producing gluten-free food. So careful sourcing of gluten-free flours and substitute products is necessary.Steps to avoid contamination include:* cleaning surfaces immediately before use* using clean frying oil for gluten-free foods – do NOT reuse oil that has cooked breaded or battered products* keeping all pans, utensils and colanders separate during preparation and cooking* using a clean grill, separate toaster or toaster bags to make gluten-free toast* making sure that butter or spreads are not contaminated with breadcrumbs.The FSA has provided guidance on gluten-free food preparation. It is available on [http://www.food.gov.uk].last_img read more

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Testing times

first_imgThe cost of malt is going up. Boo! But using malt will actually save you money. Yay! As paradoxes go and the baking industry has enough of them when you consider that supermarkets are driving down prices when they’re becoming more expensive to make that’s one of the more palatable ones.The fluctuations in barley prices closely follow those of wheat (although with malted wheat, there is a micro-market within that for a specific grade, which commands a premium). In September, when we visited malt supplier Muntons’ base in Stowmarket, malted barley was being bought in at £180 per ton close to the £200+ peak of 2007. Contrast that to 2009, where it cost between £90-£100. Farmers were selling barley at £20 per ton below cost, which means they sowed 30% less that year the effects of which have now filtered through.”The crop cost is exceptionally high this year, and we have to pass that on,” says marketing manager Andy Janes. “For some strange reason, our customers don’t like price increases! It does go both ways and we would very much like to introduce more stability into our cost structure by engaging our customers in the buying process all the way down to the farmers. Everybody in the baking industry who buys wheat, anybody who buys barley, is having the same problem.”Good job you only need to use malt in small quantities in bakery. In fact, one of the reasons Muntons invested in a recently opened innovations centre was to develop malt ingredients to drive value and profit through bakery products. Technical sales support manager John Pritchard says this has sparked a flurry of activity around malt ingredient applications for bakery, with 50 ongoing projects across its food and beverage NPD.Previously Muntons had a single test bakery tucked away in its plant, which doubled as a brewery and NPD kitchen. Now, those facilities have been split and given a new home with new technology; there is a sensory assessment and product analysis facility on-site; a photography room; and space for visitors to get packaging advice, training and technical support. What’s more, the firm can now produce small test quantities of 25kg for trial purposes in bakeries; previously, the minimum quantity they could produce was a ton.Co-operative effort”Customers increasingly want co-operation from us on product development. The ability for us to do test work for them or get them on-site means we can progress much more quickly,” says Pritchard. “We have so many ideas that we’re having to prioritise. We already have around 200 ingredient products and some of those are subtly different. So you have to taste, see and smell the product to appreciate the difference, and that’s one thing we can offer here.”So what of this miracle cost-cutting, you cry? With the price of cocoa tripling and problems of availability rife, a recent breakthrough heralds one antidote to spiralling cocoa prices: a new ingredient designed to enhance chocolate baked goods, while also reducing raw material costs. Maltichoc is a blend of roasted malt flours and dried malt extracts, which allows you to make, for example, a 20% cocoa reduction in a brownie using 2% of the ingredient; cocoa could be reduced by up to 50% in a chocolate biscuit, it is claimed.Andrew Fuller, Muntons’ product development technologist, says: “A reduction of up to 50% in cocoa powder is possible while seeing no loss of product quality.” Janes adds that it boosts the cocoa flavour and substitutes the colour, while extending shelf-life. “Even if people are using basic commodity cocoa powders, they can bring them up a level in darkness and richness,” he believes. “I actually think it gives more intensity of chocolate flavour using a small percentage.” The ingredient has a clean label of ’Barley Malt Flour, Barley Malt Extract’.Another key ingredient under development is gluten-free malt. “We’re very close to achieving that, and it’s a product we originally developed for brewing,” says Janes. There is a lot of crossover between brewing and baking; in recent years, a hopped spray malt extract, developed for home brewing, found its way into bread as a means of reducing salt levels. “We found that it enhanced the perceived salt flavour in the taster the bittering hops confused the palate into thinking it was salty when it was actually bitter. It moves the goalposts quite significantly from low-salt bread being bland, to being tasty. There is a little way to go yet, before we can use it as a direct salt substitute, but it can be part of a solution to reducing salt.”Boosting cheese flavourAnother unexpected result of playing around with malt in the lab was discovering a cheese flavour-boosting usage especially for biscuits and crackers. “People think malt has a generic flavour, but we’ve got cereal flavours through to toffee, caramel, roasted, bitter and burnt flavours, fruity flavours and even cheesy flavours,” says Pritchard.It’s not just about colour and flavour either. Malted wheat or barley flour finds its way into some less-than-obvious places, including most of the ciabatta, focaccia and croissant products on the market. It is used at a very low level for the high enzyme activity it produces during fermentation. This can make a big difference to the texture, such as a very open crumb in ciabatta when used on a high throughput sheeting line, mimicking hand-stretched wet doughs. Malt extract also goes into bagels as a clean-label means of improving volume and crust colour.Janes says that a move in the industry towards batch processing with natural ingredients has led to a “big swing back towards malt in baking”. “The baking industry has a heritage and tradition of using malt,” he says. “The Chorleywood Bread Process was a pain for us, as malt enzymes are more resilient than fungal enzymes in the oven, which was a problem for people using a high-speed process.” While malt manufacturers evolved non-diastatic ingredients without the detrimental effects of the enzyme activity, he says, “We’ve gone through that cycle and people are again beginning to recognise the importance of natural ingredients in a natural product like bread”. How do you make malt extract? A simple analogy is making a pot of tea. You roller-mill malted grains to a fine powder and infuse them in water at controlled temperatures for a set time. The starch is broken down, and you strain the liquid. The resulting liquid is called wort. This is evaporated into a more stable malt extract syrup, made up of around 20% water and dissolved solids. By using different colour grains such as a small amount of roasted grains mixed in with non-roasted grains you can produce darker extracts. So depending on the blend of grains, there is an almost infinite variety of syrup colours and strengths that can be extracted.These syrups can be spray dried to make powdered malt extracts. The partially evaporated syrup is sprayed through an atomiser and forced through a heated chamber, drying as it falls through a cyclone before the particles exit as a very fine powder. Another way of doing it is band drying, where a band moves across hotplates under vacuum. Syrup is trickled onto the band, which bubbles up like a honeycomb cake that is later coarsely milled. This can lead to a more intense flavour suitable for chocolate products, rather than the more gentle spray-drying method.last_img read more

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In Short

first_imgDunn’s buns are topsDunn’s Bakery in Crouch End claimed the top spot in The Independent’s recent hot cross bun top 10, beating the likes of Duchy Originals (2nd), and Konditor and Cook (4th). Betty’s of Harrogate’s offering came in 9th and was voted ’best luxury buy’ and Simmons Bakers was 10th.Bagel increaseCanada Bread’s UK bakery operation, Maple Leaf Bakery, which produces New York Bakery Co branded products, saw a significant increase in bagel volumes, following a new marketing campaign and the relaunch of its new-recipe bagels earlier this year. But overall volumes for its UK bakery arm were lower than last year.Work on breakfastCoffee Republic is adding to its breakfast menu this spring with a range of new sweet and savoury options. New products include English muffins, in English breakfast and cheese and tomato variants; lemon & white chocolate, low-fat blueberry and reduced-fat peach & raspberry muffins; and porridge with different toppings.CSM sees sales riseCSM’s focus on increasing selling prices to compensate for higher costs, coupled with acquisitions, has paid off, with a sales rise of 18% in its first quarter. Sales stood at E759.8m (£683.85m), from E644.1m (£579.9m) for the same period in 2010.Cocoa researchCocoa and chocolate product manufacturer Barry Callebaut has launched a research programme in Malaysia, aimed at developing sustainable cocoa cultivation techniques. It is hoped the project will yield new practical measures for boosting the sustainability and quality of cocoa production.last_img read more

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Support CLIC Sargent during Cupcake Week

first_imgTo all those bakers, coffee shops and retailers getting involved with National Cupcake Week (NCW) this autumn, British Baker is urging you to support our partner charity CLIC Sargent to raise money for children with cancer.There are two simple ways you can get involved during NCW, from 12-18 September: either by making a percentage donation from sales of a dedicated cupcake during the week; and/or stocking cupcake pin badges you can apply for 100 cupcake pin badges and sell them for a suggested donation of £1 each.By taking part, not only can you increase your cupcake sales and help raise vital funds for children with cancer, but you could also get an upturn in sales of other lines, due to your fantastic eye-catching displays in store.For more information about CLIC Sargent’s work visit www.clicsargent.org.uk or call 0300 330 0803.last_img read more

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What to do if you suspect voter fraud or intimidation

first_img Previous articleWhat to expect on your ballot in MichiganNext articleThree Fun Michiana Events To Enjoy While Social Distancing Tommie Lee What to do if you suspect voter fraud or intimidation WhatsApp Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Polls are open Tuesday, November 3rd, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the State of Michigan.Polls are open in Indiana from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.If you suspect voter fraud, report it to your state or territorial election office. You can also report it to:A local FBI officeA local U.S. attorney’s officeThe Public Integrity Section of the Department of Justice’s Criminal DivisionIf you witness or suspect voter intimidation or suppression, there are three ways you can report it:Contact your state or territorial election officeContact the Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of JusticeUse the Election Complaint Report online form Google+ Google+ Pinterest By Tommie Lee – November 3, 2020 2 693 Facebook IndianaLocalMichiganNationalNewsSouth Bend Marketlast_img read more

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Noble County enacting new COVID restrictions

first_img Google+ Facebook Previous articleBald Eagles no longer endangered in IndianaNext articleFlint water charges made official against Former Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Tommie Lee Noble County enacting new COVID restrictions Pinterest By Tommie Lee – January 14, 2021 0 392 Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Facebook WhatsApp (Photo supplied/Centers For Disease Control and Prevention) Noble County’s Health Department has responded to a recent surge in COVID-19 cases in the county with a new public health order.Much of Northwest Indiana returned to the highest alert level on the state’s COVID map this week, and Noble is among the counties in the red. Along with the strictest state restrictions for red counties from the governor’s office, a new pubic order for Noble County goes into effect Saturday and expires at the end of the month.Noble County’s bars, restaurants and other social venues , as well as gyms and fitness centers face specific restrictions. You can read the full order by clicking here.last_img read more

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Press release: 15 SCOTTISH EMPLOYERS NAMED AND SHAMED FOR UNDERPAYING HUNDREDS OF MINIMUM WAGE WORKERS

first_img As the National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage rates rise on 1 April, it is vital that workers understand their rights, and employers their obligations. Bryan Sanderson, Chairman of the Low Pay Commission, said: Business Minister Andrew Griffiths said: Heather Park Community Services Limited, North Lanarkshire ML2, failed to pay £26,018.63 to 73 workers. 1st Pizza Direct Limited, Highland IV3, failed to pay £25,668.15 to 87 workers. Mr Muhammad Adnan Safdar and Mrs Khadija Javaid, trading as Citi Dental Surgery, Glasgow City G51, failed to pay £8,733.33 to 2 workers. Cost Effective Catering Limited, City of Edinburgh EH4, failed to pay £4,559.11 to 23 workers. Mr Wayne Gray and Mrs Margaret Gray, trading as Jackson Gray, Dundee City DD3, failed to pay £2,514 to 4 workers. Universal United Commerce Limited, City of Edinburgh EH6, failed to pay £2,009.88 to 2 workers. James Ritchie Clocks (established 1809) Ltd, City of Edinburgh EH3, failed to pay £1,064.66 to 2 workers. Alison Margaret Smith, trading as A.M.S Hair & Beauty, City of Edinburgh EH12, failed to pay £935.21 to 1 worker. Mrs Lisa Chakir, trading as Chairs Hairdresser, West Lothian EH49, failed to pay £774.86 to 1 worker. Miss Zoe MacDonald, trading as Unique Hair & Beauty, Na h-Eileanan Siar HS1, failed to pay £686 to 1 worker. Clear-View Fife Limited, trading as Clear-View Cleaning Specialists, Fife KY6, failed to pay £431.63 to 1 worker. Saramago Ltd, trading as Saramago Café Bar, Glasgow City G2, failed to pay £425.63 to 4 workers. Entier Limited, Aberdeenshire AB32, failed to pay £403.07 to 1 worker. Jackson Gray Limited, trading as Jackson Gray, Dundee City DD3, failed to pay £343.38 to 3 workers. P&P Duff (Scotland) Limited, trading as Patrick, Renfrewshire PA1, failed to pay £280.15 to 1 workers. The world of work is changing and we have set out our plans to give millions of workers enhanced rights to ensure everyone is paid and treated fairly in the workplace. There are no excuses for short-changing workers. This is an absolute red line for this Government and employers who cross it will get caught – not only are they forced to pay back every penny but they are also fined up to 200% of wages owed. Today’s naming round serves as a sharp reminder to employers to get their house in order ahead of minimum wage rate rises on 1 April. Nearly £75,000 identified for 206 workers underpaid minimum wage rates. 15 Scottish employers named and fined nearly £70,000 after underpayment Naming round comes before minimum wage rates rising on 1 April This 14th naming round comes after the government published its Good Work plan last month, which announced the right to a payslip for all workers. The new law is likely to benefit around 300,000 UK workers who do not currently get a payslip.For those paid by the hour, payslips will also have to include how many hours the worker is paid for, making pay easier to understand and challenge if it is wrong. The move is part of the UK Government’s Industrial Strategy the government’s long-term plan to build a Britain fit for the future by helping businesses create better, higher-paying jobs in every part of the UK.Since 2013 the scheme has identified more than £9 million in back pay for around 67,000 workers, with more than 1,700 employers fined a total of £6.3 million. The UK Government has also committed £25.3m for minimum wage enforcement in 2017/18.Employers who pay workers less than the minimum wage not only have to pay back arrears of wages to the worker at current minimum wage rates but also face financial penalties of up to 200% of arrears, capped at £20,000 per worker.For more information about your pay, or if you think you might be being underpaid, get advice and guidance at www.gov.uk/checkyourpay. Workers can also seek advice from workplace experts Acas.The employers named today are: It is simply unacceptable for bosses to rip off their staff by not paying at least minimum wage rates. These 15 Scottish employers are breaking the law. These fines show just how seriously the UK Government takes this matter. Bosses who think that they can get away with short changing their hard working staff be warned – the UK Government will name and shame you and hit you in the pocket. The UK Government has today (9 March) named and shamed 15 Scottish employers for underpaying more than 200 minimum wage workers by nearly £75,000.Across the UK 179 employers have been named for underpaying 9,200 minimum wage workers by £1.1 million.The UK Government also fined the employers a total of £1.3 million in penalties for breaking national minimum wage laws. Fines for Scottish employers totalled £70,000.As well as recovering backpay for 9,200 workers, the UK Government also fined the employers a total of £1.3 million in penalties for breaking national minimum wage laws. The most prolific offending sectors in this round were retailers, hospitality businesses and hairdressers.It comes ahead of the next rate rise on 1 April, when the National Living Wage will go up from £7.50 to £7.83 per hour. Apprentices under the age of 19 and those in the first year of their apprenticeship will benefit from a record 5.7% rise.Later this month the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will launch a campaign to raise awareness of the new rates and encourage workers to speak to their employer if they think they are being underpaid.UK Government Minister for Scotland Lord Duncan said: The recent announcement that all workers will have a right to payslips stating the hours they have worked – an idea originally proposed by the LPC – is a positive step. The Low Pay Commission is pleased to see the UK Government maintaining the momentum of its minimum wage enforcement.last_img read more

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