Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Oct. 6

first_imgControl of Glenville should stay in townTown of Glenville residents should note that on the Nov. 5 ballot are two candidates for Glenville Town Council that are village of Scotia residents.The residents of the village have the opportunity to vote on Glenville town issues and offices, however the reverse is not applicable. Village residents also have the ability to run for town office, but again the reverse is not allowed. Seems inappropriate.This inequality should be rectified for future election cycles. However, that is the operating procedure. As a town of Glenville resident for 35 years, I do not want village residents deciding my future for elected offices or town issues.Furthermore, one of the candidates is a village employee and manages the village Highway Department. I would assume that he would need to recuse himself in any town vote that addressed highway or own infrastructure issues. That would not be in the best interest of the town or village.On the ballot there are two candidates, Jim Martin and Gina Wierzbowski, that are town of Glenville residents that have served the town well for many years and deserve to be re-elected to the Town Council position.W. Thomas BirdGlenvilleDon’t risk chance of second Trump termI am of the seemingly unique position that I despise Donald Trump but don’t think the Democrats should try to impeach him, for the reasons that it has no chance of getting through the Senate and could help Trump’s chances of reelection.When I’ve discussed this with people, one thing a lot of them have said to me is (something to the degree of) that the risk is worth it for the sake of upholding the law and/or doing the moral thing.If nothing else was at stake I would fully be on board. But would it be worth a second Trump term?Would it be worth the suffering of those who will suffer if Trump’s policies at the border or foreign policy in Yemen and Palestine continue into his second term?Would it be worth a very possible recession from his economic policies? Would it be worth the blood of American soldiers and foreign civilians that will spill if Trump continues our countless wars in his second term? Would it be worth putting ourselves at even further risk of climate catastrophe with Trump’s terrible climate policies? Would it be worth it for a legal action that will likely ultimately amount to very little, and really has lost much of its meaning since Lyndon Johnson got away with the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, and George W. Bush got away with the Patriot Act, and etc.?As I hope that Trump doesn’t get reelected, I urge the Democrats to tread cautiously.Matt OillSchenectadyLiteracy group helps out the entire regionSeptember, National Literacy Month, is over, but the work of Literacy New York: Fulton, Montgomery and Schoharie Counties continues all year.Our volunteer tutors teach adult students reading and math skills for free. It’s difficult work but highly rewarding. Many of our students go on to get a high school equivalency diploma, a job or a better job than they already have. I consider our organization an economic engine for upstate New York.I became a board member of our three-county group in 2007. I joined because I thought it would be wonderful if adults could read a newspaper or the latest best seller.Quickly I learned we’re not about that at all. When they start our courses, many students can’t read a medicine label, simple directions or a job application. When they complete our program, they can do all that and more.I’m writing to urge support for our three-county group, which has offices in Gloversville and Cobleskill. I’m proud that our dedicated tutors do so much for the Capital Region and its people.Jim PooleCobleskillMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSurveys becoming a big intrusion in lifeRecently I was “selected” by a major political party to answer a survey questioning what their election strategy should be.Don’t they have paid consultants for this? Surveys of my feelings about a recent visit to my doctor; a hotel that I stayed at; from my car dealer’s service department about a recent repair they performed on my automobile. And now watch out. We’ve arrived at the season of political surveying.Recently in a weak moment, I began to check off the answers to an email survey from a nearby chain supermarket where we regularly shop. Halfway through, my progress was interrupted by a pop-up stating that my replies to the first half of the survey didn’t qualify me to take the second half. I’m trying to help them improve their services and now my opinions are being suppressed?One survey that I’d enthusiastically answer would be regarding impeachment of that person in the White House masquerading as our president.And now comes the ultimate intrusion in my life: Nielsen, the professional research company, has sent a consumer survey containing 227 questions. One dollar bill attached for my consideration, and the munificent sum of $10 to fill out the survey. I’ll take a pass on that one.    Feedback is valuable in any business or service that caters to the public, but I’ve got other fish to fry while the survey requests mercilessly keep rolling in. Maybe I should hire a secretary.Dan RileyClifton Parklast_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, Jan. 24

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionTonko not looking out for girls’ safetyIn Decatur, Georgia, a kindergarten girl went to use the girls’ bathroom. A boy followed her into the bathroom, pushed her against the wall, and sexually assaulted her. The public school defended the boy saying he could use the girls’ bathroom because he identified as female. The public school ignored parents’ complaints and continued to allow the boy to use the girls’ bathroom.What happened to that little girl in Georgia can happen here. Recently, a 17-year-old girl from Brooklyn was attacked in a library bathroom.Males following females into bathrooms with intent to rape is common. Policies championed by Congressman Paul Tonko allow biological males to use the girls’ bathroom. Tonko elevates the desires of a few over the safety of girls. He even calls safety measures to protect girls “bigoted.”In reality, Tonko’s the one who’s bigoted towards girls. His policy opens the door to pedophiles and perverts. He doesn’t care that little girls can’t defend themselves. He tells parents too bad … so sad.Moms who care about the safety of women and children want Tonko out of office. We will vote for a woman who values our children’s safety, and her name is Liz Lemery-Joy.Jennifer RichardsBurnt HillsLowering OT would mean adding officersUnless you are saying that city legislators and the executive should add police officers, your Jan. 17 editorial (“City must get a grip on police OT“) on police overtime misses the point: There is precious little overtime if you have sufficient staff; with enough police officers, detectives and specialized unit officers you can limit much of the overtime to emergency situations.Every year we see editorials castigating officers for the long hours they put in and the corresponding overtime pay they earn while protecting the public.Clearly the council and mayor have applied a cost-benefit analysis and have decided that paying overtime is better than adding officers. So when you say the city should do something, are you advocating adding officers, which will have short-term costs of education and training, but long-term savings, savings that could save the public and the safety of the men and women who put their lives on the line for us?Bruce S. TrachtenbergNiskayunaThe writer is a former town justice.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayFoss: Schenectady homeless assistance program Street Soldiers dealing with surge in needFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionslast_img read more

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Rowland puts £1m in Artisan

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Sussex sells listed property for £660,000

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Development costs slowing price growth

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Royal secrets

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Reunited

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Jakarta air quality improves as people commute less, rainfall intensifies

first_imgThe Jakarta Environment Agency has recorded improving air quality in the capital city over the past week caused by a significant decline in the number of people commuting across the city, coupled with rising rainfall intensity.The capital’s concentration of PM2.5 – inhalable pollutant particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter – declined by around 33 percent to below 40 micrograms per cubic meter (mgc/m3) on Thursday from above 60 mgc/m3 on March 19, according to data released on Thursday by the agency.Jakarta Environment Agency spokesperson Yogi Ikhwan said the decline was in line with the trend of people working from home after the Jakarta administration declared last week an emergency situation, prompting some companies to implement a social distancing measure to prevent COVID-19 from spreading further. “The work from home [policy] is reducing mobility, so the source of pollutants is also declining,” Yogi told The Jakarta Post on Thursday.Jakarta joins other cities across the world in encouraging its residents to work from home. The contagious respiratory illness, originating in Wuhan city in Hubei province, China, has infected hundreds in the capital, making it Indonesia’s epicenter of the outbreak.Read also: Jakartans called to work from home during outbreak. Not everyone has the option.The government reported on Thursday 53 new confirmed cases in the capital city, raising Jakarta’s confirmed cases to 515, as announced by the Health Ministry’s disease control and prevention director general Achmad Yurianto. Of the 515 patients, 25 people had recovered and 46 people died. More and more people are staying at home as best they can to follow the administration’s instruction on preventive measures against the disease, as reflected in the emptier-than-usual streets across the city over the past week.”Generally speaking, Jakarta’s streets are vacant. I appreciate all the people who choose to stay at home,” Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan said during a press briefing at City Hall on Thursday.The capital’s recently improved air quality, however, does not only correlate with the declining number of vehicles traveling, but also with rising rainfall intensity as the rainy season reaches its peak, according to Jakarta Environment Agency head Andono Warih.Read also: Airvisual: Jakarta declared world’s most polluted city on Thursday afternoon”The rain falling in Greater Jakarta is cleaning the atmosphere of pollution,” Andono said in a statement released on Wednesday. “The PM2.5 concentration shows a decline when the rainfall intensity is high and the PM2.5 concentration slightly increases on days without rain.”However, Jakarta has seen a worsening trend in air quality over the past several years. It was named the fifth-most-polluted capital in the world and the fifth-most-polluted city in Southeast Asia, according to the 2019 World Air Quality Report released in February by air-quality data provider AirVisual.The report found that Jakarta’s concentration of PM2.5 increased by 66 percent to 49.4 mgc/m3 last year from 29.7 mcg/m3 in 2017. (dfr)Topics :last_img read more

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Sixty Australian newspapers to stop printing

first_imgRupert Murdoch’s Australian flagship media group News Corp announced Wednesday it will stop printing around 60 regional newspapers, as the troubled sector received a fresh blow from a COVID-19 advertising downturn.News Corp said papers in the states of New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia would cease printing and move online. “We have not taken this decision lightly,” News Corp Australasia Executive Chairman Michael Miller was quoted as saying by the group’s Australian newspaper title.  “The coronavirus crisis has created unprecedented economic pressures and we are doing everything we can to preserve as many jobs as possible.””The suspension of our community print editions has been forced on us by the rapid decline in advertising revenues following the restrictions placed on real estate auctions and home inspections, the forced closure of event venues and dine-in restaurants in the wake of the coronavirus emergency, ” he added.Many Australian media groups had already been shifting to focus to online content before the pandemic began.The announcement follows a series of media closure announcements, including national wire AAP, which is due to cease work later this year. Topics :center_img The move has echoed a global trend. The largest US newspaper publisher, Gannett, said on Monday it was making unspecified furloughs and pay cuts for its staff.Falling readerships and the rise of Google and Facebook as dominant players in advertising has made news organizations less profitable.last_img read more

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Be more coherent with COVID-19 announcements, analysts tell Jokowi

first_imgAfter Pratikno waded into the conversation, Fadjroel revised his statement to advise people not to return to their hometowns and added a point about social assistance for informal workers, many of whom have lost their source of income as economic activities slowed in the capital.The statements emerged after Jokowi declared a public health emergency on March 31 and opted for large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) over a territorial quarantine as his preferred method of containing COVID-19.He has since offered cash payouts to the most vulnerable people and shifted the Idul Fitri holiday leave period to the end of the year in the hope of getting people to stay put, experts say.It is hardly the first time officials have been caught contradicting one another in public, but the current lapse during a time of crisis made it clear that a communication protocol was needed, said Arya Fernandes, political researcher at the Centre for Strategic International Studies (CSIS).“It is important for the State Palace to prepare a communication protocol for times of crisis. The public needs trustworthy and sound information that will inspire more trust in the government,” Arya said on Wednesday.On a separate occasion on April 3, presidential expert staff member Ali Mochtar Ngabalin from the Executive Office of the President disclosed to the media that one of its officials had contracted COVID-19. The statement was later corrected by Juri Ardiantoro, acting undersecretary for political information and communication at the Executive Office.In a statement, Juri confirmed that employees of the office had tested positive for the disease in a rapid test, but a later polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, considered to be more reliable, turned out negative.Presidential Chief of Staff Moeldoko did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The confusion caused by these officials indicated that the formulated policies were still rough around the edges, Arya said, suggesting that a clear chain of command in communications would help convey the government’s messages with greater clarity.The President has no shortage of spokespersons, aides and stand-ins. Besides Fadjroel and Pratikno, Jokowi still has Cabinet Secretary Pramono Anung, a former House of Representatives deputy speaker. He also has Moeldoko, Juri and Ali Mochtar at the Executive Office of the President, as well as Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi to speak on international affairs.Jokowi’s own admission in mid-March that the government was deliberately holding back information on COVID-19 cases from the public did not increase its credibility in handling the outbreak, said Kunto Adi Wibobo, executive director of local pollster KedaiKOPI.“Without accurate data, the concern is that the public could be lulled into a false sense of security while we might in actuality be sitting in an emergency [situation],” Kunto told The Jakarta Post.To minimize the potential for future misunderstandings, Kunto said, Jokowi should take the charge in conveying government policy and action in the fight against COVID-19, including by shedding light on the motivations behind certain policy decisions.As of Thursday afternoon, all but one province in Indonesia have confirmed cases of the disease. The government tally of COVID-19 cases has reached 3,293 infections, 280 deaths and 252 recoveries.Topics : After a Cabinet meeting on April 2, presidential spokesperson Fadjroel Rachman released a statement insisting there would be no official ban on the mudik (exodus), the almost annual tradition of millions of Indonesians visiting their hometowns for the Idul Fitri holidays.Travelers, he said, should instead self-isolate for the recommended two-week period and would in the meantime be placed under general observation (ODP) when they arrive in their hometowns.Later that day, State Secretary Pratikno sought to clarify Fadjroel’s statement, saying President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo had actually called on the people not to go back to their hometowns, although he did not categorically state that the President would ban the mudik this year.Later still it was reported that Jokowi said the government had advised people not to return to their hometowns for Idul Fitri in order to contain the spread of the coronavirus. But he again stopped short of issuing stricter orders to prevent people from mobilizing, calling instead for greater community oversight at the village level to observe recent arrivals from Greater Jakarta. The central government could use a more coherent public communication strategy as it looks to address the COVID-19 outbreak in the country, with analysts pointing to deepening frustrations over mixed messages and a failure to effectively convey the seriousness of the situation.Indonesia’s government is coming under increasing pressure to provide transparency and access to information to combat the outbreak, as it scrambles to run an effective crisis response, keep the region’s largest economy afloat and ensure that public order and calm is sustained.One unusual feature of the coronavirus response has been the growing prevalence of officials contradicting one another in public, which has caused confusion in local efforts to curb a pandemic that has seen some 1.6 million people infected and more than 80,000 deaths globally.last_img read more

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