Social contribution award entries close this month

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Social contribution award entries close this month The British Computer Society (BCS) is inviting entries from organisations to win this year’s social contribution award at the BCS IT Industry Awards. The award recognises an organisation that has developed a technology which has a positive impact on society.Last year’s award was won by RoboBraille developed by the Danish National Centre for Visual Impairment for Children and Youth. It offered an email based service which translated documents into either synthetic speech or contracted Braille.The annual Awards feature a total of 24 categories which offer the opportunity to showcase excellence and expertise in IT. Categories include awards for mobile technology, social contribution, technology supplier, green computing and web-based technology.Winners will be announced at a presentation ceremony at the Grosvenor House Hotel, London, in December.www.bcs.org/industryawards Tagged with: Awards Technology  19 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 15 July 2008 | Newslast_img read more

Read More →

New CEO appointed at Localgiving

first_imgNew CEO appointed at Localgiving Howard Lake | 5 June 2014 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Mallinson mentored at the Cambridge University Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning, and is currently acting as a Prince’s Trust business mentor assisting two start-ups in East Anglia where he lives.Stephen Mallinson, said:“Marcelle [Speller]’s determination and leadership have resulted in an organisation and platform that has already helped to raise over £6 million for the 4,000+ local charities registered on the site so far. My main objective will be to drive penetration and growth among the estimated 500,000 local charities in the UK.”Lou Coady will also be joining Localgiving.com as Marketing Manager, and Chris Dormer has been promoted to Business Development Manager. Tagged with: Recruitment / people  54 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement Localgiving.com, the digital fundraising platform for local charities and community groups, has appointed Stephen Mallinson as Chief Executive.He joins from Cambridge-based cellular technology company ip.access Ltd where he was CEO. He has worked for over 35 years in the technology sector, 20 of which were at senior management level. Stephen Mallinson, CEO, Localgiving.comlast_img read more

Read More →

Ferry Abuse: Abuser may have worked with youth group in the 80’s

first_img Google+ Ferry Abuse: Abuser may have worked with youth group in the 80’s PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Newsx Adverts Previous articleGarda recounts events which lead to his colleagues deathNext articleFerry Abuse: Victim says school response makes him sick News Highland Pinterest Google+ Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twittercenter_img HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Pinterest Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Facebook Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme It is understood the he HSE will confirm later that a multi-agency response, including support and counselling services for victims, will be announced in response to the conviction of Michael Ferry.It follows representation made to the executive by Deputy Pearse Doherty, he says there may be more victims in the area and it is important that there are services in place to support all of those who have been affected by the actions of Michael Ferry both directly and indirectly.Meanwhile Ireland’s leading youth organisation is investigating whether serial paedophile Michael Ferry worked as a youth leader at one of its clubs.Foroige is understood to be examining files to see if the 55-year-old convicted sex abuser was a volunteer in the 1980s when the club was based in Derrybeg.It is believed the Foroige youth club in Derrybeg collapsed in the late 1980s and subsequent attempts to set it up again foundered. The organisation could not say exactly when or why the club was shut down. WhatsApp WhatsApp By News Highland – July 21, 2011 Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

Four arrested in Derry dissident probe

first_img Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Four people have been arrested in Derry in connection with dissident republican activity.Three men aged 54, 42 and 23 and a 16 year old boy were detained in the Brandywell area last night.Police say a firearm was also recovered during the operation. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal WhatsApp Google+ Four arrested in Derry dissident probe Twitter Pinterest Facebook Google+ Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firecenter_img Newsx Adverts RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleInquest hears how u-turn led to fatal crashNext articleHundreds turn out for riverbank vigil for missing David Colhoun News Highland 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook By News Highland – August 3, 2011 last_img read more

Read More →

22-Year-Old Derek Trucks Shreds With His Band At Trenton’s Conduit, On This Day In 2001 [Audio]

first_imgBefore there was the Tedeschi Trucks Band, and before his time as a guitarist in the Allman Brothers Band, a young Derek Trucks toured under his own name with a band he started when he was just fifteen years old. The young slide guitar prodigy – nephew of Allman Brothers Band drummer Butch Trucks – recruited talented musicians to join him on the road–some of whom are still with him today in TTB. Venturing into the blues, southern rock, jazz, gospel, soul, funk, with some Hindustani classical music, afro-beat, and world fusion mixed in, Derek Trucks’ exploratory nature was on full display in his early years.On November 30th, 2001, the Derek Trucks Band played at the Conduit in Trenton, New Jersey. The band flawlessly executed a mix of complicated arrangements throughout the performance like Jimmy Reed’s “Ain’t That Lovin’ You”, “Chicken”, and notably, “Afro Blue” by Afro-Caribbean-jazz percussion legend, Mongo Santamaria. Also worth mentioning is the set-closing cover of Bobby “Blue” Bland’s “Turn On Your Lovelight”, as popularized over the years by the Grateful Dead.Thanks to the taper community, fans can relive the band’s November 2001 performance in Trenton below.Tedeschi Trucks Band – Conduit – November 30th, 2001[Audio: Lunchbox16]Setlist: Derek Trucks Band | Conduit | Trenton, New Jersey | 11/30/2001Set: Crowd, Preachin’ Blues, Chicken, I Believe, Kam-Ma-Lay, Driftin’, Mr. PC, Ain’t That Lovin’ You, Everything is Everything, Like Anyone Else, Joyful Noise, Afro Blue (Mongo Santamaria cover), Turn On Your Lovelight (Bobby “Blue” Bland cover)Notes:This is one of the shows when Sean O’Rourke filled in on drums after Yonrico Scott was sidelined by heart surgerylast_img read more

Read More →

Scientists are blown away by hurricane experiment’s results

first_img Creative path through Harvard Forest Harvard report pushes for renewed focus on conservation Nearly 30 years ago, Harvard Forest scientists began a unique, long-running experiment on a 2-acre forest tract using a long steel cable, a winch, and a heavy-duty logging vehicle called a skidder.One by one, they dragged the cable to 279 selected trees, attached it high on the trunk, and then radioed the guy at the skidder, parked outside the tract to avoid disturbing the forest floor, to trigger the winch. And, one by one, the trees came down.When they were done, they had approximated the damage done across New England by the Great Hurricane of 1938, creating an experimental hurricane that affected 50 percent of the large canopy trees, opened the understory to new light, kick-started a decades-long recovery process, and created a nightmare landscape of fallen trunks and crisscrossed branches more easily traversed by a parkour expert than scientists charged with regularly recording the changes to come.By March 2019, the nightmare had largely subsided. The forest floor was still strewn with decomposing trunks, but their slow return to the soil had advanced enough that they were easily traversed by some two dozen scientists and visitors who gathered in the snow-covered experimental plot, in Harvard Forest’s Tom Swamp Research Tract in Petersham, Massachusetts.Around them were trees that, while younger and thinner than those they replaced, had long ago closed the gaps in the forest canopy. They were similar in makeup to those prior to the storm — a surprise for researchers expecting more pioneer species to take hold. Also remarkable was just how unremarkable the tract looked. It was like many other New England deciduous forests, bare and awaiting spring’s leaf-out on a chilly late-winter morning.In fact, that ordinariness — an expression of the stability of the New England forest ecosystem, even in the wake of a once-in-a-century calamity — was another key lesson, along with the finding that forests managed as natural environments are best left to recover themselves rather than being helped along by the “salvage logging” widespread after the 1938 storm and still common after blowdowns, fires, and tree-killing insect infestations today.,The scientists, hailing from Harvard Forest and associated institutions, gathered that morning to reflect on the conduct of the experiment, major findings, and the importance of such research, which requires a patient, long-view commitment from funding sources, from host institutions like Harvard Forest, and from the scientists themselves, a view increasingly rare in an impatient, results-now world.Addressing the assemblage that morning, Harvard Forest Director David Foster said that the hurricane experiment was important not just because of the science it enabled, but also because it was one of the first and most striking after Harvard Forest’s designation as a Long Term Ecological Research site (LTER) by the National Science Foundation in 1988.That designation, renewed at six-year intervals, has provided a foundation of financial support — about $1 million annually — for work like the experimental hurricane, and leverages between five and 10 times that in funding from other agencies. The LTER projects are also a focal point for educational programs at the forest, including both K‒12 and College-level programs. Thousands of Harvard students have visited during field trips, worked at the sites during the Summer Research Program, and studied their findings in Foster’s first-year seminar in global change biology.On March 18 and 19, Harvard Forest hosted a two-day event marking the 30th anniversary of its LTER designation. The first day was dedicated to site visits and the second to a daylong scientific symposium, with detailed presentations of results so far to 125 attendees. Today, Harvard Forest is one of 28 LTER sites across the country, part of a network that may be little known to the public but that ecologists revere.“These are storied places for ecologists,” said Harvard Forest senior ecologist Jonathan Thompson, who recently took over from Foster as principal investigator for the forest’s LTER grant. “There’s nothing like them.” “Despite the fact that this looked like a destroyed forest, because it was physically altered in such a major way, it was functioning as an absolutely intact ecosystem.” — Harvard Forest Director David Foster,After viewing the hurricane blowdown, scientists loaded into vans headed for other experiments along the narrow dirt tracks that intersect the 4,000-acre forest. One stop was a stand of towering evergreens — hemlocks being monitored by senior ecologist David Orwig. Hundreds of years old and never logged, the hemlocks’ days are nonetheless numbered because of assault by the invasive woolly adelgid, whose penetration this far north has been facilitated by the region’s ever-warming winters.The group visited the Environmental Monitoring Site, where the world’s first research tower was built to measure the intake and outflow of gases as the forest breathes. Research at the tower, pioneered by Steven Wofsy, Harvard’s Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science, and now overseen by senior research fellow in atmospheric chemistry J. William Munger, showed that recovering forests like New England’s — clear-cut in Colonial times — are helping fight climate change by locking atmospheric carbon in their wood as the trees grow thicker and push higher.The day ended at a checkerboard of brown on the snowy forest floor. The snowless plots are the hallmark of a long-running experiment in soil warming. Using heated cables buried underground, the nearly 30-year-old effort seeks to understand how soil microbes and respiration from tree roots might respond to a warming world.Maintained at 5 degrees Celsius above the surrounding soil to mirror the high end of warming estimates for the end of the century, the plots have shown that the warmed microbes and roots kick into high gear, rapidly increasing the amount of carbon released that had been locked up in the soil. After reaching a peak, the emissions declined, stabilized for several years, and then — in yet another experimental surprise — rose to a second peak.,“We figured we have a three-phase phenomenon and we have continued making measurements,” said Jerry Melillo, distinguished scientist at the University of Chicago’s Marine Biological Laboratory and a senior investigator at the forest. “We are now in a second quiescent period. Another 20 or 30 years we’ll probably get close to an answer.”Melillo said the LTER funding was critical to the experiment, first because it provided important foundational money that was augmented by funding from other sources like the U.S. Department of Energy. Then, when interest waned after the first peak of carbon emissions subsided, the LTER funding kept the experiment running. Without it, Melillo said, the second burst of carbon emissions — and the improved understanding of warming’s effects on forest soils — would have gone unnoticed.LTER and a ‘signature experiment’ Melillo, who has conducted research at Harvard Forest for 40 years, played an important role in getting the initial LTER experiments up and running, Foster said. Not long after the LTER designation, Melillo counseled that the forest needed something exciting to help it stand out.“‘What we need is a signature experiment,’” Foster recalled Melillo saying. “‘We need something that they’ll talk about at NSF, that’ll be unlike something that anybody else has done.’“I said, ‘Jerry, what is that?’ And he said, ‘I don’t know, but we gotta have it.’”Foster eventually seized on replicating one of the most devastating forces that mold the New England forest landscape: major hurricanes that blast ashore every 100 to 150 years. But how to do it? He rejected the idea of bulldozing trees because it would tear up the forest floor and disrupt the invisible but nonetheless critical cycling of nutrients and gases between the floor and the atmosphere.When Foster suggested winching trees down instead, the idea was ridiculed as unworkable by a visiting scientist: The roots were far too strong. Foster chewed over the problem until he mentioned it to John Wisnewski, a Harvard Forest staffer with experience logging.“‘I’d just pull them over,’” Foster recalled Wisnewski saying. “‘We do it all the time.’”,Wisnewski, today Harvard Forest’s woods crew supervisor, told Foster that loggers need a flat area to stage removal of logs from the forest. So instead of cutting trees, which would leave stumps behind, they simply pull them down with a winch and cable, lop off the trunks, and pile the roots to one side. An experimental path cleared, Foster turned to the forest’s archive to plan the simulated storm In 1938, graduate student Willett Rowland recorded the Great Hurricane’s damage at the forest, showing that about half of the large trees came down and that some species, such as white pine, were more susceptible to wind damage.With that knowledge in hand, Foster laid out an east-west plot 50 meters by 160 meters in the Tom Swamp tract and marked the trees to come down. Preparations complete, they drove in the skidder and hauled the cable into the forest, pulling down tree after tree, all oriented so their crowns pointed northwest, as if felled by a hurricane’s prevailing winds.Most trees came right over, Foster said, but some broke and were left to regrow as they were. Only one tree — a large old oak — resisted the skidder’s tow.“We decided that, well, in a hurricane that tree wouldn’t have fallen,” Foster said. “We went and found one of equal size downslope and pulled it over.”Then began the lengthy task of monitoring. An early revelation was the stability of key indicators like soil temperature, overall productivity, and carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas cycling among the trees, the soil, and the atmosphere.Another was that the trees didn’t die right away. Ninety percent of trees damaged by the winch leafed out regardless, photosynthesizing, drawing water from the earth, and contributing to the forest ecosystem even though they were flat on the ground. As they slowly died, the understory took over. Saplings that had been awaiting their chance shot upward, sprouts grew from the fallen trees’ roots, and newly seeded trees got started. Lost production — measured in the amount of leaf litter each fall — recovered in just six years.“Despite the fact that this looked like a destroyed forest, because it was physically altered in such a major way, it was functioning as an absolutely intact ecosystem,” Foster said.In trying to understand the forest’s unexpected stability, researchers realized that most experience with disturbed sites was at places subjected to the common practice of salvage logging, where fallen trees are cut and dragged out using soil-churning heavy equipment. In some cases, as after the 1938 hurricane, the piled debris left behind is burned.“We’re used to looking at sites that were subsequently disturbed after a major wind storm or ice storm by people going in and logging,” Foster said. “The 1938 hurricane was the biggest salvage logging exercise in U.S. history. And it pretty comprehensively turned the 1938 hurricane into one great big cutting operation.“In almost every case you can think of, if your intent is to encourage the recovery of the forest and ecosystem function with minimal change … doing nothing becomes a viable alternative.”When Audrey Barker-Plotkin arrived at the site eight years after the pulldown, just walking around was a challenge. Today a senior researcher and the author of several studies on the site, she recalled having to weave through tangled branches and wrestle with wiry new growth that all seemed to be at “face level.”“It was like walking through a jungle gym. The plot seems a lot smaller now that you can see through it,” Barker-Plotkin told the visiting scientists. “Just the changes I’ve seen in 20 years have been really remarkable. … [The site] was different every single year.” When it’s best to do nothing at all Harvard study finds a story of survival in blown-down forests Bullard Fellow brings passion for conservation to his work A pragmatic model to conserve landcenter_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Another thing scientists didn’t expect, Barker-Plotkin said, was the stability of the tract’s species makeup. Researchers thought that more pioneer species like cherry and paper birch — usually fast-growing colonizers of disturbed sites — would take hold. But the stability of even the damaged ecosystem didn’t provide much of an opening. While those species did appear in disturbed soil around upturned roots, that was less than 10 percent of the forest floor. Invasive species, another threat at disturbed sites, were also absent, she said.Today, she said, the experimental plot has largely recovered structurally, but is still struggling to catch up with the surrounding forest’s growth. Tree volume has reached about 80 percent of what it was before the pulldown, but measurements of the nearby control plot show that the surrounding forest has grown 25 percent over the intervening decades as part of New England forests’ continued recovery from Colonial-era clear-cutting.New leaders and a landscape full of questionsLike the long-term processes they measure, the hurricane pulldown and other experiments continue to produce data even as their original investigators’ careers come to a close. A smooth transition to new leadership will be essential in maintaining both research continuity and excellence, Foster said. At several sites the group visited, experimental founders handed off presentations to younger researchers, as Foster did to Barker-Plotkin at the hurricane site and Melillo did to University of New Hampshire Professor Serita Frey, a soil microbe expert, at the soil warming experiments.LTER’s new principal investigator, Thompson, spoke of the importance of ensuring the continuity of key long-term experiments even as researchers move on from work that has run its scientific course.“In some ways, the experiments they set up in the ’80s just look so prescient now,” he said.An important question still to be explored is how long recovering forests will keep absorbing carbon, Thompson added. That answer has potentially crucial implications for climate change, since global forests absorb roughly 20 percent of the excess carbon humans emit.Part of the problem, Thompson said, is that though remnant old-growth patches exist, they may not be good models for understanding forests regrowing on former farmland, since they’re typically in poor growing locations, which is why they weren’t cut in the first place.“We know how much [carbon] is in the forests,” Thompson said, “but we don’t know how much carbon can be in these forests.” New England is losing 65 acres of forest a day Related ‘You absolutely have to embrace change,’ says author and Harvard Forest directorlast_img read more

Read More →

Watch A Gentleman’s Guide’s Cast Get ‘Happy,’ Pharrell Style

first_img Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 17, 2016 Related Shows View Comments After picking up a whopping ten Tony nominations, more than any other show this season, everyone involved with hit musical A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder has every reason to be happy! In the below video, Tony nominee Bryce Pinkham performs Pharrell’s infectious hit “Happy” along with the musical comedy’s cast, crew and orchestra. Watch out for Jefferson Mays popping up in scene stealing fashion (of course he does), then go and see the cast killing it (get it?!) at the Walter Kerr Theatre. Imagine the fun this bunch will have if they walk off with a whole load of Tonys on June 8! A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder Bryce Pinkhamlast_img read more

Read More →

Ørsted-led consortium moving forward with offshore wind-powered green hydrogen project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:Danish pure-play renewables company Ørsted A/S on Tuesday announced a partnership with local firms on a sustainable fuel project to be powered by offshore wind energy.The company’s partners include Copenhagen Airports, shipping company AP Moller – Maersk, transport and logistics company DSV Panalpina, shipping and logistics company DFDS and Scandinavian Airlines (SAS).The partners have teamed up to develop a hydrogen and e-fuel production plant which, by 2030, is planned to reach a total electrolyser capacity of 1.3 GW. The facility will potentially be located in the Greater Copenhagen Area, with renewable power to be supplied by an offshore wind farm in the Ronne Banke zone southwest of the island of Bornholm.The first stage of the project will consist of a 10-MW electrolyser which will make renewable hydrogen. It is expected to be operational by 2023. In the second stage, a 250-MW electrolyser will be deployed and combined with carbon capture technology to also produce renewable methanol and e-kerosene. It could be operational by 2027 when the offshore wind farm in the Ronne Banke zone could start delivering power.In its third stage, the facility is expected to be fully scaled-up by 2030 when it will be able to deliver over 250,000 tonnes of sustainable fuel annually and save 850,000 of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions annually.Renewable hydrogen produced by the plant will be used for buses tendered by public transport agency Movia and heavy-duty trucks managed by DSV Panalpina. The facility will also produce renewable methanol for AP Moller – Maersk vessels and renewable jet fuel for SAS’s airplanes and air transport out of Copenhagen Airports.[Aleksandra Dimitrova]More: Ørsted joins forces with local firms on massive green hydrogen, fuel project Ørsted-led consortium moving forward with offshore wind-powered green hydrogen projectlast_img read more

Read More →

Development costs slowing price growth

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More →