Record breaking chicken nuggets tweet triggers $100k donation to charity

first_imgTo mark the breaking of the record, Wendy’s made a donation to charity of $100,000 or around £78,000. This was given to the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, a nonprofit set up by the founder of Wendy’s in 1992. The record-breaking success of a US teenager’s tweet asking for a year’s supply of chicken nuggets from a fast food chain has generated a corporate donation of $100,000 to charity.Carter Wilkerson in Nevada tweeted to Wendy’s on 6 April, asking how many retweets he would need in order to receive a year’s free supply of chicken nuggets. Record breaking chicken nuggets tweet triggers $100k donation to charity Wendy’s replied within a minute or so, with a terse and seemingly insurmountable “18 Million”.That did not put Wilkerson off. “Consider it done” he replied. He took a screenshot of the Twitter conversation and posted it, asked for help from Twitter users in reaching that target. It wasn’t poetry, but it got noticed.  134 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis19 Howard Lake | 10 May 2017 | News Eighteen million retweets is a tall order, given that the then record of most retweeted tweet was the 3.43m achieved by actor Ellen DeGeneres’ selfie of fellow actors at the Oscars ceremony.Yet Wilkerson’s tweet has now passed that, and is at 3.54 million retweets. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  133 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis19 Tagged with: corporate Guinness World Record Humour Research / statistics Twitterlast_img read more

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TCV’s Community Network celebrates 60th anniversary with free membership offer

first_imgTCV’s Community Network celebrates 60th anniversary with free membership offer  245 total views,  2 views today About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  Main image: 2018 TCV Growing Communities in Adur and Worthing  Tagged with: Volunteering TCV’s Community Network is offering free membership to community groups as part of its 60th anniversary celebrations.The TCV Community Network now has 1000 members, and, thanks to the support of players of People’s Postcode Lottery, is offering groups Community Network Membership free of charge for one year starting from the date of their subscription in 2019.Annual Community Network membership is usually £38 per year.The membership offers discounted insurance, practical and operational advice, guidance and support to any community group that is committed to protecting their local environment and green spaces.Joanne Bushby, Community Network Administrator said:“What always amazes me is the diversity of the groups, the drive they have and the never-ending desire to keep giving to their community. Thank you so much to players of People’s Postcode Lottery because I know that your support has made a huge difference in helping our groups.”TCV Community Network member, Kamil Pachalko from Southend in Transition added: Advertisementcenter_img “Membership of the network gave us access to handbooks, grants and the insurance which made setting up our project much easier. We didn’t want the hassle of reinventing the wheel. The free membership this year means we can invest more in our local community and activities.”Groups can find out more about membership and apply via the TCV site. Melanie May | 12 April 2019 | News  246 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7last_img read more

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More than 3,000 groups already signed up for Giving Tuesday 2019

first_img More than 3,000 groups across the UK have signed up to participate in this year’s Giving Tuesday so far, from charities such as the RSPB and the Scouts Association to retailers Clarks and ASOS, large businesses including BT and Samsung and institutions such as the National Gallery and the University of Manchester.Giving Tuesday is now less than a month away, this year taking place on 3 December. Last year, more than £7.8 million was raised in online donations in the UK on the day, with 1.5 million in a YouGov poll saying they were more likely to do some for charity as a result of the event.Launched in the US in 2012 to follow post-Thanksgiving shopping sprees, there are now Giving Tuesday events in more than 100 countries, with the movement brought to the UK by the Charities Aid Foundation in 2014.Gráinne Mathews, who leads Giving Tuesday in the UK for CAF, said: “Giving Tuesday is a chance for all of us, no matter where we live or what we do, to help a cause close to our hearts.” “This year we are encouraging people to make a #GivingTuesdayPledge, which means you might be doing something on the day for a charity that you love or you can pledge to commit to doing something in the days and months ahead. Either way, you are still part of this incredible generosity movement.“A #GivingTuesdayPledge could mean giving a small monthly donation to a charity or setting aside time each month for volunteering. It will all add up to make a world of difference.”More information on how to take part, as well as free resources for participants are available on the Giving Tuesday site. Advertisement Melanie May | 5 November 2019 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Can you believe it? Only 4 weeks to go until #GivingTuesday ? There’s still plenty of time to get involved. Here’s how: ? Charities: https://t.co/31SFSz7c0m? Individuals: https://t.co/VJPbThXwKn? Businesses: https://t.co/AbRHMXpR45#charitytuesday pic.twitter.com/Tkh0KxVFDk— #GivingTuesday UK (@givingtuesdayuk) November 5, 2019  590 total views,  6 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis18 Tagged with: Giving Tuesdaycenter_img Here is UK Fundraising’s round up of some of last year’s activity:Giving Tuesday: the fundraising round up  589 total views,  5 views today More than 3,000 groups already signed up for Giving Tuesday 2019 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis18last_img read more

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Irish investment industry makes €500,000 donation

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Irish investment industry makes €500,000 donation  166 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Basis.point, the Irish Fund industry’s charitable arm, has committed €500,000 to three educational projects.The basis.point funding has been given to the Early Learning Initiative (ELI), Foróige and Archways and brings the total currently committed to €1.9 million. This is benefiting children across the educational system from 18 months to 18 years.Edel O’Malley of basis.point said: “It is a privilege to deepen our existing relationships with such inspirational educators. ELI and Foróige provide an extraordinary resource for our communities and through our programmes, each year we will positively influence the lives of over 70 families and educational aspirations of over 3000+ young people.”Basis.point started supporting the ELI in 2015. Following positive feedback on the ParentChild+ (formerly Parent Child Home Programme) basis.point increased its funding in 2017, allowing ELI to train additional home visitors in order to increase the capacity of families that could be accommodated in the programme.The latest grant of €225,000, as part of the €500,000 allocation, will allow ELI to continue to run the ParentChild+ programme in Dublin and Limerick and expand the programme to include Ballinasloe in County Galway.  165 total views,  1 views today Howard Lake | 11 February 2020 | News Matched fundingThe ELI will also benefit from a co-funding agreement where €25,000 from basis.point will be matched by real estate company Kennedy Wilson over a five year period, to support the Home from Home programme, aimed at vulnerable families living in temporary accommodation.The second tranche of funding to Foróige will support the running and further rollout of  the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship programme.A supplementary grant of €30,000 has been allocated to Archways to facilitate some refinements that will enhance the effectiveness of their programmes in Wexford and Kilkenny and run an additional mentoring training course in Cork.Archways will also benefit from a €25,000 co-funding agreement with Kennedy Wilson.Aidan Tiernan, Chairman of the Disbursements Committee, said: “These latest grants further ensure that we are supporting educationally disadvantaged children through-out the whole of Ireland, with over 60% of our investment now allocated for children living outside of the Dublin area.”Currently basis.point has over 300 patrons and supporters in the industry and is supported by asset managers, service providers, professional firms and independent directors of the Irish Investment Fund and Asset Management Industry. Tagged with: corporate fundraising Ireland matched giving About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Why the April 2 People’s Tribunal is timely

first_imgThe opening session of the “People’s Tribunal on Police Violence and Structural Racism” scheduled for April 2 at the National Black Theatre in Harlem, N.Y., could not have come at a better time.A project of the Peoples Power Assemblies, the tribunal is being organized because “The cases of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Ramarley Graham, Amadou Diallo and countless others have shown that the legal system is incapable of delivering justice in cases of police brutality. The system has failed the people, so the people will hold their own court. We must put the police on trial and let the people judge!” (Peoples Power Assemblies, Facebook)The Facebook page continues: “Over the coming weeks and months, at community hearings across the country, the People’s Tribunal on Police Violence and Structural Racism will hear testimony from the victims of police violence and their families, along with the insight of activists engaged in the struggle. Testimony will cover the full range of police offenses, from everyday harassment to summary executions.“Related issues, including but not limited to mass incarceration, the militarization of schools, the War on Drugs and domestic violence will also be addressed in order to illustrate the connection between police brutality and the larger system of state violence and structural racism. Later this year the Tribunal will hold a final session to present its findings, conclusions, and recommendations.”Since the police murders of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and countless other Black people including women, there has been an ever-growing increase in police terror. This includes the vicious beatings of Martese Johnson, a student at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and 57-year-old Floyd Dent, a United Auto Worker member in Inkster, Mich. Both of these attacks were captured on videotape.But police terror is just one aspect of the structural racism based on white supremacy that helps to sustain the profit-driven capitalist system.  Consider the controversial video of white members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity from Oklahoma University singing a song riddled with the racist “N” word and calling for the lynching of African Americans.  There is also the recent lynching of a Black riverboat worker, Otis Byrd, in Port Gibson, Miss., which has gotten very little national attention.In a March 4 Workers World newspaper article, “Oscars and mass incarceration show why BLACK LIVES MATTER,” Monica Moorehead wrote, “African Americans make up an estimated 13.6 percent of the U.S. population, but in 2010, Black men alone constituted 40.2 percent of prisoners, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.”The article continues, “Here is a breakdown of these 2010 percentages: Black men were incarcerated at a rate of 3,074 per 100,000 residents; Latinos at 1,258 per 100,000; and white men at 459 per 100,000. (Population Reference Bureau, Aug. 2012) The Bureau of Justice Statistics states that one out of three young Black men will go to prison in their lifetime.”These staggering statistics and heinous examples of killings and murders are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of unearthing the divide-and-conquer capitalist system that thrives on institutionalized racism. People of color, especially youth and young workers, in disproportionate numbers, along with a growing number of white youth, increasingly have no future as the global capitalist crisis deepens. Youth need decent jobs at union-scale wages, not police and state terror.The April 2 meeting will help lay the basis for indicting the entire capitalist system, with a strong demand to disarm the police.Go to peoplespower.net on April 2 tribunal.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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‘Remember that our people always, always resisted’

first_imgFollowing are the full remarks of Mahtowin Munro, co-leader of United American Indians of New England, at the 46th annual Day of Mourning rally in Plymouth, Mass., on Nov. 26. To hear her talk, visit tinyurl.com/hga5975.  Mahtowin MunroWW photo: Liz GreenWe want to give a shout-out to those who are observing Unthanksgiving at Alcatraz Island this morning and to all our people everywhere who are taking the time to mourn our ancestors instead of celebrating thanksgiving. We understand that there was a sunrise ceremony in Washington state this morning and that people in Baltimore are spending an hour right now honoring National Day of Mourning and also supporting Walmart workers there; and there are small observances happening in many places all around the country and the world. We welcome everyone who has traveled here as family. New York City is in the house! Thank you to the International Action Center for bringing a bus from Manhattan once again. There is also a Haitian community bus that came from Brooklyn. Merci a Daoud et notres amies Haitiennes. We want to welcome our union sisters and brothers from Local 8751 Boston School Bus Drivers who help us with the logistics every year, no matter what. And in this time of rampant Islamophobia in many quarters throughout the world, we want to give a special welcome to our Muslim friends who are here today.Now let us all focus together on our ancestors and come together.  ]Today we mourn the loss of our Mashpee sister, Constance “Lone Eagless” Cromwell, who stood proudly at National Day of Mourning for decades. We remember Sam Sapiel, Wamsutta Frank James, all the elders who came before us and who have passed into the spirit world. When the Europeans came into our harbors with their little boats, no one could have imagined the destruction that would follow. So many Native people died so rapidly that scientists now say it caused planetary climate change. Millions of living beings, animals, insects, birds, fish, plants were wiped out by the ravages of European colonialism. The land and water and sky have been violated. All of this is in our hearts as we stand here today. ‘Government continues to oppress us’Indigenous people are largely erased in mainstream media, in government statistics, in discussions of race and racism. Additionally, we have to deal with disrespect and cultural appropriation — that is what happens when people rip off our cultures and designs, or when you see pop stars and white kids at music festivals wearing fake headdresses.But we resist this erasure at every opportunity, whether it is by public awareness events like today or by teaching our languages and cultures to our children. There is still a lot of racism directed toward us by hateful people, the same kind of people who want to keep waving their confederate flags. They don’t care that our Native youth have the highest suicide rate in the country — in fact, some bigots joke about things like this. These bigots ignore or mock the extreme disparities in health, housing, education and income that Indigenous people face daily. Even when we speak loud and clear for everyone to hear on an issue that should be a matter of simple human decency — when we say that schools and sports teams need to stop using racist mascots and team names — some white people refuse to listen.  This past year, President Obama expressed concern about the conditions of Indigenous people in the U.S. We will see whether any of these government efforts will last very long, but it has at least given hope to some youth that they will not continue to be ignored. Some youth from this area, including my son, were at the White House Gathering for Tribal Youth this summer, and were awestruck to see Michelle Obama there. We cannot forget, though, that this is the same government that continues to oppress us, to treat us as subject people rather than as sovereign nations, and to steal, exploit and devastate our lands for its own benefit. It is the same government that keeps our brother Leonard Peltier in prison for nearly 40 years now. Leonard Peltier, an innocent man, was framed up by the FBI. We really need people to get behind an all-out effort to demand clemency from President Obama, who could pardon Leonard rather than a turkey. We will have a message from Leonard a little later in the program. We pray today for all of our sisters and brothers in prison. Additionally, we are glad to note that the right to participate in sweat lodge ceremonies will now be legally restored to Native prisoners in Massachusetts as a result of a court decision two days ago.Violence and sexual assault against Native women continues to be rampant.  Usually, it is by a non-Native man who is then often not prosecuted. At least one out of three Native women report having been sexually assaulted. In Canada, there is a push for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit People. Thousands of Indigenous women are trafficked, missing or murdered in Mexico and the U.S. as well. We pray today for them and their families. This violence against women is deeply tied to the violence against the earth that has happened since the first day of the European invasion. I pray too for transgender people, who honored a Trans Day of Remembrance this week. We have talked for many years here about how much we all hate Columbus Day. The campaign to abolish Columbus Day and declare the second Monday in October to be Indigenous Peoples Day has really gained ground this past year, with cities ranging from Albuquerque to Seattle to Ann Arbor coming on board. And we are happy to announce that we are initiating a campaign for this in both Cambridge and Boston, with the support of some folks from the North American Indian Center of Boston. We will have a lot more information to share about this at a later date and will seek everyone’s help and support, so please make sure to follow us on social media for updates.Some of you here went on the Justice Or Else march in D.C. last month. That march was amazing in part because it did so much to strengthen the links between Black and Brown people. This understanding will grow stronger.Due largely to the work of Black Lives Matter and other Black-led movements, this year has been one in which awareness about deaths by police and in custody have been brought to the forefront nationally. And before I say anything else, I want to say: BLACK LIVES MATTER! Some of you may be surprised to learn that Native people are over-incarcerated and have very high rates of deaths by police and deaths in custody, comparable to rates experienced by Black people in the U.S. I know that some people now are using the slogan Native Lives Matter — not meaning to appropriate the term from Black people so much as to draw attention to what is happening to our people, too. You may not have even heard about the cases of Native people who have died — Paul Castaway in Denver, Sarah Lee Circle Bear in South Dakota, many more — so please learn more about this after you leave today. This is not something that just started happening recently. Some of you here will painfully remember that a Mashpee man, David Hendricks, was shot by the police back in 1988. We pray for all of the victims of state violence and their families, that they will find justice.On frontlines of environmental struggles Throughout the Americas, Indigenous people are on the frontlines of many struggles against pipelines, fracking, mining, tar sands. This is because many of these projects are going directly through or near our treaty lands. President Obama recently turned down the Keystone XL Pipeline project after more than six years of silence on it, and that was great news. That victory came about because of the steadfast resistance of Indigenous people and allies, and there are many more fights to come. For instance, right here in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, there have been struggles against a company called Spectra and their natural gas operations. Everywhere, everywhere, Indigenous people have been talking about the sacred water — walking for the sacred water. We cannot live without water, water that is being poisoned and wasted.  In August, the Environmental Protection Agency caused a toxic mine spill in Colorado that led mining poisons to be unleashed on the Colorado, Animas and San Juan rivers. The portion of the Navajo Nation along there could no longer draw water for livestock and crops, and farmers wept at the sight of their crops wilting. Despite urgent pleas, federal government agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency have refused to give the Navajo Nation the help that it needs to deal with and recover from this disaster.In Arizona, John McCain and other corrupt politicians have signed Oak Flat, a sacred Apache site, over to a mining company. We must work to reverse that. In Hawaii, the University of Hawaii wants to build the world’s largest telescope atop sacred Mauna Kea, but Native Hawaiians and allies have been doing everything possible to protect Mauna Kea and stop that from happening.The struggles of Native people do not end at the border with Canada or Mexico. There is a lot going on in Canada (though not enough time to talk about it). Some of you may know that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission presented its report about the Indian residential schools this past year. The suffering and genocide caused by the residential schools continue to resonate in many lives and communities in the U.S. as well.In Mexico, Indigenous students and many other people have been murdered by government forces in Ayotzinapa and elsewhere.  Some of us consider Palestinians to be our Indigenous cousins; our histories have so many parallels, and they continue to endure daily violence, the theft of their land, the destruction of their homes, the murder of their children. In Australia, in Brazil, in country after country, Aboriginal people are dealing with many of the same issues that we deal with here. We pray for and stand in solidarity with all of them.Help youth make a better worldI feel that my first obligation is as a mother. That obligation is not only to my children and grandchildren, but to all the youth, to support them and help them make a better world. Some of us believe that this generation of youth will really be able to make change in the world and lead the way. We can see that happening already, with Native youth providing leadership on matters in their own communities and bringing some reality into international discussions on climate change. Indigenous students also are an important part of the inspiring fightbacks against racism happening on campuses all over the country, including Native students in this region at UMass, Brown, Dartmouth, Yale, Harvard and elsewhere.I keep hearing that those of us who have suffered from racism, violence and genocide experience something called intergenerational trauma. The trauma keeps reverberating. I read that what we have suffered can even change our DNA. The history we talk about here is not just something we can forget about. It is with us every day. It is literally in our bones and our blood, in every cell.  But I do believe that we can heal and transform when we talk about these things, come together in community, work together to decolonize our minds and make a better world, just as we are doing today.       To our beautiful, inspiring Native youth, I say: Learn about and remember what your ancestors went through to bring you here. Remember that our people always, always, always resisted. Remember too that we are so proud of you, because you are becoming the generation that our ancestors dreamed of.  FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Behind Duterte’s shift toward China

first_imgAn announcement by President Rodrigo Roas Duterte of the Philippines, made during a state visit to Beijing on Oct. 20, that his country would reorient its foreign policy toward China and away from the United States has opened up the prospect of major infrastructure development in this Pacific islands nation of more than 100 million people.Ever since the U.S. defeated Spain in the war of 1898 and took over its colonies, Washington and Wall Street have treated the people of the Philippines as a source of low-wage labor and their land as a base for military operations in the Pacific. U.S. neocolonial domination over the islands has been absolute in political, economic and military terms, interrupted only by the equally harsh occupation of the Philippines by Japanese imperialism during World War II.As a result, the Philippines has been mired in poverty and underdevelopment.Millions in extreme povertyIn 2006, the National Statistics Coordination Board of the Philippines reported that nearly 29 percent of the population lived on less than $1.25 per day. In 2013, when the NSCB conducted its most recent survey, the percentage living at this level of poverty had barely changed, while the cost of just putting food on the table every day had risen in those seven years from $39 to $127 a month.In this same period, poverty in many other countries around the world had decreased significantly, especially in China.The more urban areas in the National Capital Region around Manila have the lowest poverty figures, ranging around 3.9 percent. Many young people who have left to find work overseas send remittances home to their families.Poverty is highest in the more agricultural provinces. According to the NSCB, the Mindanao Region had the highest poverty levels, ranging from 42 to 47 percent. Duterte was a mayor and congress member from Mindanao before becoming president.So it should be no surprise that there is much enthusiasm among the people of the Philippines for Duterte’s visit to China and the resulting agreements in infrastructure development, trade and other economic areas.Duterte has support — but not on Wall StreetBut in Washington and on Wall Street, the reaction is dismay and increasing hostility, even when cloaked in diplomacy. There are dire warnings that Duterte’s statements about pivoting toward China and away from the U.S. will bring economic ruin.CNNMoney on Sept. 24, in a segment entitled “This industry is freaking out over the Philippine president’s anti-U.S. rhetoric,” reported that Duterte’s comments “sent a shudder through industries that rely heavily on the U.S. market, particularly the big business of handling call center work and other tasks for American companies.” The implication is that these U.S.-owned call centers will go somewhere else if the owners are angered by the government’s attitude.What it doesn’t mention is that the centers pay people in the Philippines wages far below those in the U.S.CNN quotes a senior State Department official, Daniel Russel, as saying after a meeting with the Philippine foreign minister that Duterte’s remarks have fueled growing concerns in “corporate boardrooms.”CNNMoney speaks to bankers and business people. In other U.S. media oriented to the general public, the attacks on Duterte have centered more on his blunt style and his relentless campaign against drugs, in which many accused drug lords have been killed by police. No mention is made, of course, of the fact that U.S. prisons are full of people convicted of nonviolent crimes connected to drug possession and that many police killings of people of color allegedly involve drugs.Nor is anything being said in the media here about what plans the Pentagon and other U.S. agencies of violence and repression may be discussing in response to Duterte’s move. But history has shown that the U.S. political establishment has no respect for sovereignty or peaceful negotiations when it considers the core interests of the imperialist ruling class at risk.However, there is a mitigating factor against the U.S. resorting to violent intervention to bring the Philippines more securely back under its control.It is the fact that there has long been an armed as well as a civil anti-imperialist opposition in the Philippines that enjoys much support among the masses. Should the U.S. move too directly or violently to thwart the direction now being taken by Duterte, the resulting reaction of the people could spiral out of U.S. control.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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ILWU Local 10 halts work to fight racism

first_imgLongshore workers shut down container truck traffic over racist acts at the Port of Oakland in California.In a stunning worker action against racism, about 100 members of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 10 walked out May 25 at one of the largest and busiest terminals in the Port of Oakland. They suspended all operations there and brought international container traffic to a complete standstill for hours. Container trucks were backed up all around the port and on Interstate 880.The ILWU called the shutdown to protest blatant racist acts at the job site, including the discovery that morning of a noose, a despicable symbol of white supremacy and lynching, inside a truck used by ILWU members. According to Derrick Muhammad, the union’s secretary-treasurer, about 60 percent of the ILWU local is African American. (KPIX 5)Muhammad noted that an unspecified number of nooses have been found at the terminal in recent weeks. They have been left on a fence, on the ground and on trucks. Another noose was found as recently as May 15. In late 2015, someone had spray painted a piece of equipment with a racist slur against African Americans. (East Bay Times, May 25)Muhammed said that longshore work is already inherently dangerous, and all workers need to know that their co-workers “have their backs.” He stressed that “every worker has the right to work in a safe environment.” He pointed out that this fact makes the racist acts “a bonafide health and safety issue because of the history behind the noose and what it means for Black people in America.” A health and safety issue is an acceptable reason for a job walkout under standard union contracts.The East Bay Times reported that ILWU International President Robert McEllrath issued a statement that “the ILWU is a progressive and diverse union, and we reject in the strongest possible terms racism in all its forms. The display of a hangman’s noose for the second time in two weeks at the work site is inexcusable and expressly prohibited conduct under the terms of the ILWU-PMA collective bargaining agreement. The Union is committed to securing a non-discriminatory work environment for all individuals working at the ports.”ILWU Local 10 has a long and militant history of progressive work actions, from its leadership in the 1934 San Francisco general strike under Marxist Harry Bridges to its boycotts of South African apartheid cargo, starting in 1962.More recently, in 2010 the local shut down the port to protest the murder of Oscar Grant, an African-American man killed by cops at Oakland’s nearby Fruitvale Station. Last year the local affirmed its support for Indigenous sovereignty at Standing Rock, N.D., and this year refused to work on Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, to protest the election of Trump and the ramping up of attacks on working and oppressed people, especially unions.Every racist act or symbol at a workplace is significant because racism is always an attack on the solidarity and unity of workers. The recent action by Local 10 is a call to all workers to fight against racism and for solidarity at their jobs with creative and militant actions.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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‘Pablo lives! Death to the gig economy!’

first_imgMemorial for Pablo Avenando, run over on his bike while delivering food.Philadelphia — About two hundred friends, co-workers and family members rallied here on May 19 to celebrate the life of Pablo Avendano. Despite persistent rain, speakers climbed onto a pickup truck parked near the site where he was killed at 10th Street and Spring Garden. They talked about why he was so loved in Philadelphia’s progressive activist community.Avendano, 34, was riding a bike for food-delivery service Caviar on May 12 when he was struck by a car and then run over by another one during a heavy evening rainstorm. Pablo worked full time for Sparrow, a courier service, but was also working a night shift at Caviar to help make ends meet.While some media and newspaper articles have made this tragedy into an issue about the need for protected bicycle lanes in the most-biked city in the U.S., others have raised the gig economy as the real cause of the Argentine immigrant’s death.Avendano was one of millions of workers earning a substandard income from precarious employment. Trapped in a vicious circle, they are forced to moonlight using Uber, rent out their homes via Airbnb, or deliver food and other commodities using their own cars, bikes or homes in order to make ends meet.Most of the new jobs that President Trump brags he’s been creating are “gig,” precarious or “sharing” jobs, which do not provide livable wages. Even though the companies might employ thousands of these workers, they are not entitled to weekly wages and benefits or covered by safety and other regulations. On the books of accountants and government regulators, they are treated as “independent contractors” and are forced to accept piecework, low wages and few benefits in often dangerous conditions while wealthy executives and owners profit handsomely.When it’s raining, freezing or otherwise too dangerous to be on the roads is when many people are ordering food deliveries. Because fewer cyclists are willing to make deliveries at these times, Caviar gives pay incentives. Avendano worked in dark, wet conditions on May 12, hoping to take advantage of the higher pay per delivery.Avendano’s comrades are demanding that Caviar pay for all travel and funeral expenses for his family; reclassify riders as employees, not independent contractors; pay its workers a living wage, starting at $20 an hour with health benefits, hazard pay and bike repair-and-maintenance reimbursement; and respect the workers’ right to organize a union.Avendano’s partner, Anna Marie Drolet, told the gathering: “Pablo cared about what was happening in the world. He died because he was bringing food to people with money who were too lazy to go out to get their own.”Area activist George Ciccariello-Maher said, “Pablo was a wage slave who died because the rich make more money by not paying higher wages and benefits. He was nothing to them.”Friends have set up a fundraiser to help pay his death expenses at gofundme.com/all-out-for-pablito.A press release signed by “Comrades and friends of Pablo Avendano” ends with: “Pablo was a lover of life, and a passionate fighter for workers’ rights as well as racial and economic equality. We honor his memory by upholding his commitment to making the world a better place by taking up his struggle as our own.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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On the picket line

first_imgHundreds of LA caregivers march for higher wagesHundreds of in-home care workers marched through downtown Los Angeles June 26 to the County Board of Supervisors meeting to demand higher wages, at least a $1/hour raise. The day before, the board had approved a $31.4 billion budget without an increase for the 170,000 in-home supportive services (IHSS) workers, mostly older women of color, many of whom are im/migrants. The IHSS caregivers earn $11.18 hourly and provide care — bathing, meals, transportation, tracking medications and household tasks — so that more than 206,000 seniors and people with disabilities can stay in their homes and live as independently as possible.Large groups of caregivers, members of Service Employees Local 2015, packed the boardroom June 26, wearing vivid purple T-shirts with the union logo. One IHSS worker, who cares for an 84-year-old woman who can’t walk on her own, challenged the board: “I just want to invite you — all the supervisors — to come and work a day in our shoes. Then maybe you’ll realize how much we need that raise.” (mynewsla.com, June 26)San Diego hotel workers demand better payHundreds of hotel workers and supporters marched through downtown San Diego June 27 over a contract dispute and briefly blocked the driveway entrance of the Marriott Marquis on Harbor Drive. The demonstration was among many UNITE HERE held that day in cities across the country, including Los Angeles, San Francisco and Boston.Marriott has 44 properties in San Diego County, with more than 11,000 hotel rooms. “We believe they need to set the standard for the best wages, the best benefits, and they don’t,” said Brigette Browning, president of UH Local 30. Contracts have expired or are expiring for workers in the Marriott-owned Westin San Diego Gaslamp Quarter in Horton Plaza, and Local 30 representatives say the two sides are still far apart.Among the marchers was Karen Betancourt, who has delivered room-service meals at a Marriott for four years. “We love our job,” she said. “We love this property. We just want to make enough money to live here.” Having to work two jobs to make ends meets, Betancourt is paid minimum wage supplemented by tips, but she doesn’t get enough hours to qualify for health insurance.“What we want is very simple,” said Chris Guerra, who sets up tables at the Westin. “To work just one job and be able to own our houses. If they take care of us, we’ll take care of them.” (San Diego Union-Tribune, June 27)UE Local 228 members arrested at ‘People’s Hearing’ in N.H. state houseAs part of the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, United Electrical Workers Local 228 members rallied in the New Hampshire state house in Concord on June 11 to demand a living wage and end “the assault on the rights of organized workers.” (The state abolished its minimum wage in 2011.) Members of Local 228, who work at the National Visa Center in the U.S. Department of State, helped occupy the Governor’s Executive Council Chamber and held a People’s Hearing where workers aired their grievances and demanded redress. Local President Bill Ladd testified that the local had been able to boost workers’ earnings substantially since its founding in 2016.After state troopers announced at 5 p.m. that the building was closed, 10 Local 228 members continued to take testimony. When they refused to leave, they were arrested and charged with criminal trespassing. (Union Victories!!, June 15) But that didn’t stop the local from protesting. On June 28 union members marched with the slogan “Janus won’t stop us.” (Facebook: UE Local 228)Money for education, not for war, demands Chicago Teachers UnionDelegates in the Chicago Teachers Union unanimously passed a resolution June 6 titled “Unjust Wars of Aggression Leave All Children Behind.” After noting that public schools in working-class communities and communities of color in Chicago and throughout the U.S. “are consistently underfunded” and the federal government could end that underfunding if education were a priority, the resolution states that Trump’s budget increases military funding by $80 billion and describes the many countries like Venezuela where the U.S. has a war agenda. The CTU wants the federal government “to renounce use of a nuclear or other pre-emptive strike on Iran, North Korea or any other country and to prioritize peace and social spending [instead of] military expansion and war-mongering.” The resolution ends by proclaiming that “the Chicago Teachers Union will support and participate in mobilizations and other actions … to stop a ramp-up to war” and will work for quality education for all students.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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