‘Pablo lives! Death to the gig economy!’

first_imgMemorial for Pablo Avenando, run over on his bike while delivering food.Philadelphia — About two hundred friends, co-workers and family members rallied here on May 19 to celebrate the life of Pablo Avendano. Despite persistent rain, speakers climbed onto a pickup truck parked near the site where he was killed at 10th Street and Spring Garden. They talked about why he was so loved in Philadelphia’s progressive activist community.Avendano, 34, was riding a bike for food-delivery service Caviar on May 12 when he was struck by a car and then run over by another one during a heavy evening rainstorm. Pablo worked full time for Sparrow, a courier service, but was also working a night shift at Caviar to help make ends meet.While some media and newspaper articles have made this tragedy into an issue about the need for protected bicycle lanes in the most-biked city in the U.S., others have raised the gig economy as the real cause of the Argentine immigrant’s death.Avendano was one of millions of workers earning a substandard income from precarious employment. Trapped in a vicious circle, they are forced to moonlight using Uber, rent out their homes via Airbnb, or deliver food and other commodities using their own cars, bikes or homes in order to make ends meet.Most of the new jobs that President Trump brags he’s been creating are “gig,” precarious or “sharing” jobs, which do not provide livable wages. Even though the companies might employ thousands of these workers, they are not entitled to weekly wages and benefits or covered by safety and other regulations. On the books of accountants and government regulators, they are treated as “independent contractors” and are forced to accept piecework, low wages and few benefits in often dangerous conditions while wealthy executives and owners profit handsomely.When it’s raining, freezing or otherwise too dangerous to be on the roads is when many people are ordering food deliveries. Because fewer cyclists are willing to make deliveries at these times, Caviar gives pay incentives. Avendano worked in dark, wet conditions on May 12, hoping to take advantage of the higher pay per delivery.Avendano’s comrades are demanding that Caviar pay for all travel and funeral expenses for his family; reclassify riders as employees, not independent contractors; pay its workers a living wage, starting at $20 an hour with health benefits, hazard pay and bike repair-and-maintenance reimbursement; and respect the workers’ right to organize a union.Avendano’s partner, Anna Marie Drolet, told the gathering: “Pablo cared about what was happening in the world. He died because he was bringing food to people with money who were too lazy to go out to get their own.”Area activist George Ciccariello-Maher said, “Pablo was a wage slave who died because the rich make more money by not paying higher wages and benefits. He was nothing to them.”Friends have set up a fundraiser to help pay his death expenses at gofundme.com/all-out-for-pablito.A press release signed by “Comrades and friends of Pablo Avendano” ends with: “Pablo was a lover of life, and a passionate fighter for workers’ rights as well as racial and economic equality. We honor his memory by upholding his commitment to making the world a better place by taking up his struggle as our own.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Journalists suffer new threats as atmosphere of impunity prevails

first_img News On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia December 4, 2019 Find out more ArgentinaAmericas According to the journalist, Fontenla had telephoned the officer in charge of the police station and told him that if Garcia made a complaint against him, he should not believe him. He was later released. The journalist told Reporters Without Borders: “I can’t go on working after this attack. It is too difficult.”A few days later, about 3 a.m. on 20 August, unidentified attackers threw a Molotov cocktail that set fire to Novelino’s car, which was parked in a garage at his home in Bernardo de Irigoyen. The journalist, who was inside the house at the time, was unhurt. He managed to move the car out of the garage and put out the fire.Novelino told Reporters Without Borders he had received threats since he took over as director of El Pepirí 18 months ago. He added that he was in no doubt that the attack was linked to his exposure of corruption among local politicians.“It is tragic, but there is no justice here,” he concluded. ArgentinaAmericas Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Argentina Garcia recorded the incident on his cell phone, which he had turned on before arriving for the meeting. He subsequently recounted it on air at the radio station and reported it to the authorities. Fontenla was taken to a police station where he denied it ever took place. Latin American media: under control of families, economic and political elites News Reporters Without Borders is deeply shocked at the attacks and threats suffered by two journalists in Argentina in the past 10 days.In the central city of Sancti Spiritu, Hernán García (photo), manager of the radio station FM UNO, was threatened at gunpoint by the mayor, who told him he would kill him. A home-made bomb badly damaged the private car of Silvio Novelino, director of the monthly El Pepirí, in Bernardo de Irigoyen in the north-eastern province of Misiones.“These two cases are all the more shocking since physical attacks on journalists are less frequent in Argentina than in other countries in the region,” Reporters Without Borders said.“We urge the relevant local authorities to take all the necessary steps to ensure these two incidents do not go unpunished and to guarantee the safety of the two journalists concerned.”Garcia was summoned to a meeting by the Sancti Spiritu mayor, Abel Fontenla, on 14 August to discuss allegations he had made a few days earlier of irregularities in the public accounts. The journalist told Reporters Without Borders what happened took him completely by surprise.According to Garcia, Fontenla threatened him with a pistol, which he put into his mouth, telling him: “I have come to kill you. I already told you I was going to kill you.”The journalist managed to escape after a struggle. “I ran for four kilometres without looking back,” he said. “I abandoned my car, I left everything behind.” center_img Organisation July 6, 2020 Find out more November 19, 2020 Find out more Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world Receive email alerts News News to go further RSF_en August 24, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalists suffer new threats as atmosphere of impunity prevailslast_img read more

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Pasadena Unified Issues Statement on Coronavirus

first_img More Cool Stuff Dear Pasadena Unified Community:The Pasadena Unified School District is continuing to work closely with the Pasadena Public Health Department, the L.A. County Office of Education, and the L.A. County Department of Public Health to monitor the latest developments about the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), provide accurate information to our communities, and keep our students, teachers, and staff safe and healthy.On Tuesday, officials from the Centers for Disease Control warned that the novel coronavirus will almost certainly spread in the United States, and that schools and businesses should prepare for a possible pandemic.We understand that this statement may be creating concerns for our school community. While the fact remains that there is still only one confirmed case in L.A. County, PUSD is preparing and planning to keep our students and staff safe. At this time, there are no plans for imminent school closures.PUSD is updating protocols and preparing plans for virtual learning for schools in the event of a prolonged emergency of any kind, including coronavirus. We will keep you updated as this plan develops. Information is also posted at pusd.usAs a reminder, the most important thing we can all do is to practice good hygiene habits, including staying home if you feel sick – and that the best prevention against any virus is to wash our hands often. To help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including the coronavirus and flu, public health officials encourages everyone to:• Stay home and away from others if you have a mild illness (with a fever of 100°F or above).• Stay at home until you are free of fever for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medications.• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.• Be sure to get your influenza vaccine to protect yourself from the flu.In addition, we want to ensure that our schools continue to focus on creating a welcoming environment for all students as there may be fear in our communities.PUSD Health Programs is working closely with the Pasadena Public Health Department and our schools to provide guidelines and resources to share accurate information and take appropriate action. If you have questions about these topics, please contact our Health Programs office at (626) 396-3600 ext. 88243. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News Make a comment Subscribe 6 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Sincerely,Brian McDonaldSuperintendent top box 6 Pasadena Unified Issues Statement on Coronavirus District working with county stakeholders to monitor situation Published on Thursday, February 27, 2020 | 3:51 pm Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Additional Information:Video from L.A. County Office of Education Superintendent https://youtu.be/ZzTk4oYtiGQCenters for Disease Control https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.htmlPasadena Department of Public Health https://www.cityofpasadena.net/public-health/ LA County Department of Public Health Information & Frequently Asked Questions Community Newscenter_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  HerbeautyZac Efron Is Dating A New Hottie?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWho Was The Hollywood ‘It Girl’ The Year You Were Born?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Man convicted of Strabane native’s murder in Dublin

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Twitter Pinterest Twitter Previous articleFive new Covid cases in Donegal ; 211 cases and one death nationallyNext articleNews, Sport, Obituaries and Nuacht on Friday September 11th News Highland A 41 year old man has been convicted of the murder of a father of five in the Sunset House Pub in Dublin in April 2016.Strabane native Michael Barr died after being shot seven times at close range.David Hunter with an address at Du Cane Road, White City, London has been found guilty at the non-jury Special Criminal Court.His DNA was found in a mask in a car involved in the shooting, which was part of the Hutch/Kinahan feud.The victim’s father, Colin Barr, spoke outside the court……..Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/19barr.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Man convicted of Strabane native’s murder in Dublin Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th center_img AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA By News Highland – September 11, 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApplast_img read more

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Bakehouse

first_imgFollowing the launch of its Rusticata bread, Bakehouse (Bagshot, Surrey) has expanded the range with a selection pack of three flavoured bake-off dinner rolls.The rolls were created using the Rusticata dough, which is made with semolina flour, to give a golden colour, and virgin olive oil for extra flavour. The rolls are given a reduced proving time to ensure they stay compact and are baked on the oven floor to enhance the rustic look and flavour.The three varieties are: Petite Baguette (45g), Malted Grain Navette (50g) and Parmesan Pave (40g). Each Rusticata roll has been given a different shape to identify the flavour variants and to give interest in the bread basket.last_img

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Harvard gets $500k gift for history museum

first_imgThe Harvard Museum of Natural History has received its largest donation since its founding in 1998. The $500,000 commitment from a Harvard University alumnus will help fund a permanent multi-media exhibition focused on the natural history, environmental significance, historical development and conservation of New England forests…Read more here (Boston Business Journal)last_img

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Around the Schools: Harvard Kennedy School

first_imgThe Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard University has announced that the Initiative for Responsible Investment (IRI) has joined the center.The IRI serves as a platform for dialogue on fundamental issues and theories underlying how financial markets can promote creating wealth across the triple bottom line of people, planet, and profit. The IRI examines responsible investment across asset classes, and conducts research, convenes stakeholders, and catalyzes practical action on issues important to the responsible investment community.The IRI, founded in 2003 with the guidance of Steve Lydenberg, chief investment officer at Domini Social Investments, is led by Director David Wood. Current research and projects include the practice and value of corporate social responsibility investing; alternative theories of investment across asset classes; and the roles of investment consultants.As part of its programming, the IRI has helped create two parallel organizations. The Responsible Property Investing Center is a collaboration with the University of Arizona to stimulate new vocabulary, research, and investments in the field of responsible property investing, using research and education to build a community of practice around environmental and social investment strategies in the real estate industry. The IRI also hosts More for Mission, an association of foundations dedicated to promoting mission investing, which has the dual objectives of furthering social goals while earning financial returns. It also encourages other foundations to adopt such practices.If you have an item for Around the Schools, please e-mail your write-up (150-200 words) to [email protected]last_img read more

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Finding Japan, through its past

first_imgStudying early modern Japanese history may not sound like a delight. After all, you have to learn the language, along with several archaic variants.But David Luke Howell, Harvard’s newest professor of Japanese history, not only has made Japan’s Tokugawa period (1603-1868) a life’s work, he has managed to use it to explore some offbeat cultural sidelights. Those include night soil, matchlock firearms, disgruntled samurai, and 19th century hairstyle reform.Regarding that last item, Howell — a writer of uncommonly witty and clear academic prose — recently penned an essay called “The Girl with the Horse-Dung Hairdo.” (The dung was what the piled-up hairstyle resembled.)Within a couple of years, Howell promises a slim, playful volume on the subject of night soil, a human fertilizer no longer in favor, but which in premodern Japan was a powerful economic and even scientific preoccupation. (He has read — yes — many 19th century books on fertilizer practices.)  At the same time, his more grave and major research interest involves investigating the fear of violence and social disorder in the period leading up to the Meiji Restoration of 1868.The restoration was Japan’s pivotal moment. It revived an ancient imperial tradition, banished the feudal regime of the Tokugawa shogunate, and sent Japan hurdling into modernity. Howell likes to quote the British Japanologist Basil Hall Chamberlain (1850-1935), who witnessed the transformation. Japan went from a seeming Middle Ages to an era “full of talk about bicycles and bacilli,” said Chamberlain. “Old things pass away between a night and a morning.”That friction point between old and new Japan captivates Howell, who earned his Ph.D. in 1989 at Princeton University, where he taught from 1993 until last year.But Japan escaped being swallowed up by colonial powers. “A lot of their more aggressive energies were focused on China,” Howell said, and there were other distractions, like the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War, and an emergent, powerful Germany.Japan also progressed readily from its feudal shell because there was a ready substitute for the Tokugawa shogunate, an imperial infrastructure that had survived as a weakened remnant of ancient Japan. Howell said that imperial power “was open for people to interpret as they chose.” The emperor’s focusing presence became an explicit machine for achieving modernity quickly.But nostalgia for the Tokugawa period persists in Japan, said Howell, and to Western observers attracted to this feudal time of roaming samurai, relative peace, and stable social hierarchies. The era seemed to engender the elegant simplicity and the playful, artistic culture of today.Studying Japanese history makes sense for three reasons, said Howell, who also teaches at Harvard Extension School. Japan is the world’s third-largest economy. Also, “people, as a general principle, should be literate about different parts of the world.” But mostly, said Howell, studying the Japan of the 17th through the 19th centuries exposes students to the idea “that there are lots of perfectly reasonable ways to run a society.”Japan in the early modern era, after all, was safe, orderly, and hygienic.  “If you had to choose a place to live in 1800, or almost anytime before antibiotics, you would not do bad choosing Japan,” he said.Yet that Japan operated on a vastly different cultural logic. It was a world in which “it was a matter of common sense that all people are created unequal,” said Howell, “and that the purpose of law was to maintain order rather than the pursuit of justice as an abstract principle.”A convergence of factors led Howell to studying Japan. For one, he was born there. (His father worked for the U.S. military.) For another, after age 10, Howell grew up in Hawaii, where the theaters on weekdays screened Japanese B-movies — gangster, comedy, and samurai flicks that awoke in him a sense of the culture.What sealed Howell’s academic fate was the nearly four years he spent in Tokyo right after high school, going there with his family the first year. (His father, by then a Berkeley-trained sociolinguist, took the family with him on sabbatical.) “I fell in love with Tokyo almost immediately,” said Howell. He studied academic subjects in English at Sophia University, took a drumbeat of Japanese language courses, stayed on after his parents left, and reluctantly returned home to finish his bachelor’s degree at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo.Until early in graduate school, Howell’s passion outside of Japanese history was bridge. Now he’s content to follow baseball, and to pursue a related quest: to visit all 30 major league stadiums with his teenage son. “Eight to go,” he said.last_img read more

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NDSP investigates forcible fondling

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating a weekend report of forcible fondling that occurred at a student-sponsored event in the late hours of Friday evening, according to an email alert sent to students Saturday. Forcible fondling is defined in the email as “the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or, not forcibly or against that person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.” The definition is legally established by federal law, cited in the email as the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics or the Clery Act. The incident, which was reported to NDSP on Saturday, occurred in a building on the north side of campus where a student-sponsored event was taking place, the email stated. “Forcible fondling … and other sexual assaults can happen to anyone,” the email stated. “Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault.” Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault is available from NDSP and the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention online. To report a crime in progress, suspicious activity or another emergency, dial 911 from any campus phone or 574-631-5555 from a cell phone.last_img read more

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Cardinale: County Health Officials Covering Up COVID-19 Outbreaks

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) JAMESTOWN – Democratic State Assembly candidate Christina Cardinale is charging county officials with intentionally covering up local COVID-19 outbreaks.In an exclusive interview with WNYNewsNow, Cardinale said County Executive P.J. Wendel and Public Health Director Christine Schuyler are hiding the truth about outbreaks from the public.“The current county executive and our current county health director have done everything in their power to withhold information and cover up COVID outbreaks,” Cardinale said. “The clusters that have happened in this county are way higher than we’ve been told.”Wendel responded by noting that the county has nothing to gain by misrepresenting the facts regarding COVID-19 rates in the area. “If there was a case of numbers being withheld or some sort of conspiracy, why are we waiting until now to bring this up,” Wendel said.Chautauqua County Executive P.J. Wendel. WNY News Now File Image.He explained that when someone tests positive, the county doesn’t immediately get the information. It is sent to the state, which then informs the county to begin contact tracing.“The numbers we have are the factual numbers,” said Wendel. “It’s not county health that gets the results. The state posts the number of positive cases and tells us. We can’t cover up numbers, those numbers are listed with the state.”Cardinale says she personally knows of a business in Jamestown that had a cluster of positive tests in late March, but she said Chautauqua County Public Health Director Christine Schuyler froze the business from going public with the outbreak.“I’m absolutely disgusted with the way our county executive and our current county health director have covered up information and I will do everything in my power to ensure this doesn’t continue,” Cardinale said. “They are willfully withholding information and putting the public at risk.”Asked what motive the two would have to do so, she replied she doesn’t know why.“I really don’t know why they would play games with peoples’ lives,” she said.Wendel stressed that the county’s job is to get the facts correctly and not publish inaccurate figures.“We have eight more (positive cases) and it is adding our total to 82. It does us no good to hide this,” Wendel explained.“It is a health concern and I want this information to be right. If I were to come out and give wrong data and that sends a frenzy in the public,” Wendel furthered.He said one of his duties is to dispel potential panic by the public.“We’re making sure we don’t create that hysteria, we do not create that panic,” he said.Wendel says he is disappointed by the accusations.“I can tell you right now, it’s disappointing. Where was this statement prior to this,” he said. “If we’re hiding numbers, what would that do us. This is forth coming when you put 24 (cases) in a day. How is that helping us? We’re all in the same boat.”Efforts to reach Health Director Schuyler by WNYNewsNow were unsuccessful.If elected to the State Assembly, Cardinale said she would propose legislation to force county health departments to be more transparent than she feels they have been.“My legislation is intended to act on a state level to implement the transparency that’s need for our county and the rest of New York State,” Cardinale said.She said she has not gotten any responses from county officials, who she said she has e-mailed and also left messages.Cardinale’s proposal calls for county health departments to “provide the general public with clear, concise information regarding COVID-19 cases (or other infectious outbreaks such as E.Coli, Norovirus, H1N1, or Rotavirus). All Health Departments will be required to identify positive cases by exact geographic city or town. The use of “fire battalions” or “quadrants” or any combination of locations will be prohibited.”Democratic State Assembly candidate Christina Cardinale.Image via Christina Cardinale For State Assembly / Facebook.In addition, her bill would block county officials from stopping a business from going public with information about positive tests. Also, county officials would not be allowed to include political statements in health matters and be part of a strict social media conduct policy.“In the event one (1) positive COVID-19 case is linked to any business (employee) or public school (student or faculty member) within NYS, the business or school will be required, by law, to notify the County Department of Health immediately. The County Department of Health will then be required, by law, to release this information to the public within a timeframe of no longer than 24 hours,” she proposes.“If a “cluster” of positive COVID-19 cases is identified by a Department of Health within NYS, said Department of Health will be required, by law, to release this information to the public within a timeframe of no longer than 24 hours. “Cluster” will be defined as a group of five (5) individuals (or more) that are traced to the same source of infection.last_img read more

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