FluidSurveys joins CTT’s Technology donation programme

first_imgFluidSurveys joins CTT’s Technology donation programme  27 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Technology company Chide.it has added its online survey tool FluidSurveys has joined CTT’s technology donation programme, CTXchange. This will give more charities access to a tool that allows organisations quickly to gather and analyse informal data through online surveys, forms, or polls.Eligible organisations can receive a donation of a one-year subscription to the online Pro version of FluidSurveys. They can renew this subscription annually, provided they continue to be eligible in each year. The FluidSurveys donation is available to organisations with annual operating budgets of £300,000 or less.CTXchange enables eligible UK registered charities and charitable housing associations to receive hardware and software products, donated by leading brands, to support their operations. CTXchange is part of a global network, operated by TechSoup.Richard Craig, CEO of CTT, said: “FluidSurveys will enable eligible organisations to use online surveys to gather valuable feedback on their programs and services, allowing them to improve and further develop how they operate”.www.ctxchange.org/getting_started Howard Lake | 4 June 2011 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Charity Trust corporate Donated goods Technologylast_img read more

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Winter Wheat Frost Damage

first_imgHome News Feed Winter Wheat Frost Damage Andy BaileyAfter cold temperatures both last week and so far this week I wanted to touch on potential frost damage on winter wheat.  Looking at wheat fields last week in North Central Indiana we saw some leaf damage on the tips of upper leaves.  With most of the wheat in the floret formation stages (Weekes 6-8) there shouldn’t be much concern as most of the damage was observed on upper leaf tissues.  There are a couple things to observe if you suspect frost damage.  First observe the head and the stem. If the head is green and looks healthy with no signs of damage there should be minimal damage, signs of trouble include heads that are white in color or poor grain set.  A kinked stem is also a sign of frost damage but can also be a sign of low plant fertility.The wheat that we saw last week appears not to be badly damaged, but should continue to be monitored as there is still time to switch crops this early in the growing season.This article was written by Farm Clinic for questions and service information contact Andrew Bailey by phone: (765) 659-1783. Facebook Twitter Winter Wheat Frost Damage Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Previous articleGary Wilhelmi Weekly ColumnNext articleNew App Helps Farmers Predict Corn Yields Throughout Growing Process Hoosier Ag Today By Hoosier Ag Today – Apr 23, 2012 last_img read more

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BUDGET 2014 – Summary

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest By News Highland – October 15, 2013 News Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week WhatsApp Facebook LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Google+ Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Previous articlePolice in Strabane warn parents to be vigilant following approaches to childrenNext articleKieran Mc Laughlin arrested in Derry after 5 hour operation News Highland Facebook Minister Michael Noonan and Brendan Howlin have presented Budget 2014 with free GP cards for children under five, steep hikes in the price of alcohol and cigarettes and cuts to pensioners allowances, central to this years package.While there are to be no changes to the weekly old age pension payments, the monthly telephone allowance for pensioners is being scrapped.Income thresholds for full medical cards for those over the age of 70 is being reduced by 100 euro per week – a move which it is estimated will see 35,000 pensioners being downgraded to a GP only card.Despite speculation to the contrary the free travel allowance for pensioners remains as do gas and electricity allowances but presicption charges will increase to two euro fifty.If you are newly unemployed and under the age of 26 your dole payment is being reduced.Bad news too if you fall sick, you will now not receive any illness benefit from the state until you are six days away from work, that’s doubled from three days.There are no changes to child benefit payments this year, however maternity benefit is being cut or standardised to 230 euro per week for all.In the classroom pupil-teacher ratios will remain unchanged and a rent a book scheme is being reintroduced in primary schools.There’s good and bad news for home owners, mortgage income supplements are being abolished from January but if you are having home improvements carried out, you’ll be able to claim back a 13.5 per cent credit on work costing between five and thirty thousand euro.A new banking levy aimed as raising 150 million euro is to be introduced. Savers will be hit with increases in DIRT tax, up from 33 to 41 per cent, while there will be increases too in capital gains and capital acquisitions taxA raft of new measures aimed at tackling the shadow economy have also been signalled.These will target VAT fraud, illegal tobacco selling and unlicensed trading in alcohol.The so called old reliables don’t escape either, 10 cent is to be added to a pint of beer, cider and a standard measure of spirits, while 50 cent will be added to a bottle of wine.10 cent will be added to cigarettes from midnight but motorists got off scott free with no changes to petrol or diesel. Home heating oil and gas prices remain the same.Despite fears that a gradual increase in VAT would be introduced for the hospitality sector, the 9 per cent rate announced last year is to remain in place.To further support the travel and tourism sector, Air travel tax is to be reduced to zero from April next year provided airlines develop new routesAs previously signaled 200 million euro from the sale of the national lottery will go towards the building of the new national children’s hospital, but it was announced today that the remaining 200 million will be used to support local job creation programmes such road maintenance and repair works, and the building of a new national indoor training arena at the national sports campus Twitter WhatsApp Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Google+ BUDGET 2014 – Summarylast_img read more

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Oireachtas bar should be open to the public – Deputy Doherty

first_img 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest The members’ bar in the Oireachtas is “a den of secrecy” and should be opened to all visitors to Leinster House, Sinn Féin finance spokesman Pearse Doherty has said.The Donegal South West TD is also said that a photograph of former building society chief Michael  Fingleton be removed from the wall of the bar.Leinster House facilities include a members’ bar and a visitors’ bar. The former is confined to current and ex-members of the Dáil and Seanad while the latter is open to visitors, staff and the press.The public can gain access to Leinster House as guests of Oireachtas members and, as such, are eligible to use the visitors’ bar, but not the members’ bar.Writing on his blog, the Donegal South-West Deputy Pearse Doherty described the members’ bar as “a place that represents all that is wrong with Irish politics. It is elite, exclusive and secretive.”Mr Doherty said he was shocked to see a photograph of “none other than Michael Fingleton surrounded by a bunch of current and former Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael TDs and Senators”.The golf team photograph of Mr Fingleton also features then TDs Austin Deasy, Hugh Byrne, Tom Enright, Robert Molloy and the late Colm Hilliard, Senators Denis “Dino” Cregan and Donie Cassidy.They were the winners of the 1987 Army-Garda-Press-Oireachtas Challenge Cup for golf, presented by Irish Nationwide Building Society.Unwilling to go on the record, a politician featured in the photograph told the Irish Times that Pearse Doherty has little to talk about.Click here to read Deputy Pearse Dohetys blog By News Highland – April 7, 2011 News Previous articleNew deal on borefish set to benefit Donegal fishermenNext articleSecond arrest in connection with the murder of Ronan Kerr News Highland Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Google+center_img WhatsApp Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Oireachtas bar should be open to the public – Deputy Dohertylast_img read more

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One in five suffer food allergies

first_imgResearch has revealed that one in five people are now affected by a food allergy or intolerance.A study by YouGov interviewed 1,600 representative adults, and will present its full findings at the FreeFrom summit in London next month. This comes as new allergen regulations are set to be introduced as of December this year.The study also found that almost double the number of women suffered from a food intolerance compared to men.The FreeFrom summit will discuss the growth of the FreeFrom food industry over the past five years. It will also outline the effect the allergen regulations may have on the food service industry, including those in the bakery sector.As from December 2014 all foodservice outlets must be able to give accurate details of any of the 14 major allergens in their food, including gluten, to any customer who asks.Speakers at the summit include Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne, founder of Genius gluten-free bread, as well as Sarah Sleet, CEO of Coeliac UK.The event will take place on 10 and 11 September.last_img read more

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Empty Bowls to fill coffers

first_imgAn empty bowl can be a symbol of hunger and need. An empty bowl also can be an object of grace and beauty.And when members of the Harvard community and their neighbors roll up their sleeves and turn art into awareness, empty bowls can become an effective method of raising money for the hungry and the homeless.That was the premise of the Empty Bowls open house and dinner held Thursday at the Harvard Allston Education Portal Annex on North Harvard Street. The fundraiser, the third public event in the annex, utilized the talents of Harvard students, artists at Harvard’s Ceramics Program, and other community partners to raise money for the Allston-Brighton Food Pantry and the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter.“We have never done something like this before,” said Shawn Panepinto, acting director of the Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard (OFA). “I was very impressed at how many people volunteered.”An international grassroots effort to fight hunger, Empty Bowls uses a simple but effective formula. Potters and other craftspeople create handmade bowls. Guests are invited for a meal of soup and other food, and, for a donation, keep the bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world. The donations go to organizations working to end hunger and food insecurity.With more than 1,000 bowls to choose from, Rita Lam of Braintree and Bob Breslin of Allston take time to make their final selection.Last year, the OFA ceramics program and Harvard Public Affairs & Communications decided to organize the University’s first Empty Bowls event. For the past year, organizers have worked with members of the Harvard community to make more than 1,000 bowls. The effort included hosting a massive “glaze-a-thon” that brought in people who had never tried their hand at clay before.More than 200 tickets priced from $10 to $25 were sold for the event. Attendees chose favorites from among the hundreds of finished bowls elegantly displayed in the annex. They sampled pizza, salad, bread, and cookies, all donated by Cadbury Commons, Stone Hearth Pizza, Finale Desserts, Panera Bread, and Oggi Gourmet. Harvard University Dining Services donated soup. Many attendees bought multiple tickets because they couldn’t resist getting more than one bowl, or couldn’t choose a favorite among the multitude of creations. All proceeds will go to the two charities.Kathi Tighe, who works at the ceramics studio, praised the Empty Bowls event as a way to bring the community together for a cause. “I think it’s a great event. It’s a terrific way to support charities and get people to donate to charity in a way that feels right,” she said as she struggled to balance a stack of pots she was gathering for friends with tickets.Many of those in the ceramics program who made and donated bowls also bought tickets.“They’re the biggest supporters of this event,” Panepinto said. They included Darcie Flanigan, who has retired from a post in Law School admissions. She began studying pottery five years ago after an archaeology dig made her curious about clay. In making bowls for the event, she emphasized both functionality and grace.“We wanted people to come in here and get a sense we were really contributing to the community,” she said. She was thrilled by the turnout. “I have never been to an event with a crowd this enthusiastic and this polite.”Jack Megan, director of the Office for the Arts, emphasized the ties between the Allston community and the ceramics program, which has been a fixture in the neighborhood since 1987.  The program provides a creative studio and laboratory study environment for Harvard students, staff, and faculty, as well as local and international artists, scholars, and scientists.“This studio sits at the intersection of many different communities, the Harvard students and faculty, but also the community of artists from Greater Boston, Allston, and beyond,” Megan said.Ariel O’Connor (left), a Baird Fellow at the Harvard Art Museums, and Debra Cuoco, a paper conservator at the Harvard Library, get a feel for the variety of textures the bowls have to offer.Currently housed in a single-level warehouse building at 219 Western Ave., the ceramics program will move to 224 Western Ave. as part of Harvard’s 10-year plan for its Allston locations.  The new ground-level studio will offer a new street-side exhibition space and will continue its arts programming.“Empty Bowls at the Ed Portal Annex is a wonderful idea that builds community among Harvard departments, local nonprofits, and businesses, and Allston and Cambridge neighbors, while promoting the arts and combating hunger and homelessness,” said Maile Takahashi, director of community programming.“Everyone walked away inspired by the missions of the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter and the Allston Brighton Food Pantry and the care and enthusiasm of the participants of the Harvard ceramics program.  It is exciting to take part in events that support meaningful connections between Harvard and its neighbors and the Harvard arts program that will be part of the growing activity and vitality in Barry’s Corner.”Harvard senior Charlie Hobbs, administrative director of the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter, said of the event, “It is really exciting to see so many people on the Harvard community come together and support two causes that are really important to people who live in this area.”The Rev. Karen Fritz, pastor of the Brighton Allston Congregational Church, which hosts the Allston-Brighton Food Pantry, spoke with fervor about the 33-year history of the pantry and the church’s food ministry.“The image of an empty bowl is such a powerful reminder of all the empty bellies of people around this world,” she said.last_img read more

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Corey Hawkins Set for Six Degrees of Separation

first_img View Comments Six Degrees of Separation Straight Outta Compton’s Corey Hawkins will join the previously announced Allison Janney and John Benjamin Hickey in the Broadway revival of John Guare’s Six Degrees of Separation. Directed by Trip Cullman, the production will begin previews on April 5, 2017 before opening at the Barrymore Theatre on April 25. The limited engagement is scheduled to run through July 16.Hawkins is set to take on the role of Paul, the young con man whose trail of deceit lies at the heart of the play. He first gained recognition with his breakout performance as iconic music producer and hip hop legend Dr. Dre in Straight Outta Compton. Hawkins will next star as Eric Carter in the new iteration of Fox’s 24 franchise, 24: Legacy. Other screen credits include Kong: Skull Island, The Walking Dead and Iron Man 3. Hawkins made his Broadway debut in 2013 as Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet, opposite Orlando Bloom and Condola Rashad; he has also been seen on stage in Hurt Village and Suicide Incorporated.Inspired by a true story, the play follows the trail of a young black con man, Paul (Hawkins), who insinuates himself into the lives of a wealthy New York couple, Ouisa and Flan Kittredge (Janney and Hickey), saying he knows their son at college. Claiming he’s the son of actor Sidney Poitier, Paul tells them he has just been mugged and all his money is gone. Captivated by Paul’s intelligence (and the possibility of appearing in his father’s new movie), the Kittredges invite him to stay overnight. After finding him in bed with a hustler, their picture of Paul changes, and Ouisa and Flan turn detective trying to piece together the connections that gave him access to their lives. Meanwhile, Paul’s cons unexpectedly lead him into darker territory as his lies begin to catch up with him.Guare’s drama-comedy premiered off-Broadway in 1990 and transferred to the Great White Way later that year. Stockard Channing, who received a Tony nomination for her performance as Ouisa, reprised her role for the film adaptation, earning an Oscar nod.The production will feature sets by Mark Wendland, lighting by Ben Stanton and sound by Darron L West. Related Showscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 18, 2017 Corey Hawkins(Photo: Ben Gabbe/Getty Images)last_img read more

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Ontario SARS report cites health system failings

first_imgJan 12, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Inadequate worker-safety protocols probably contributed to the severity of the 2003 SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) epidemic in Ontario, a provincial commission said in a report unveiled this week.”Two nurses and a doctor died from SARS. Almost half of those who got SARS in hospital were people who got SARS on the job from working there,” wrote Justice Archie Campbell, who authored the 1204-page report, released on Jan 9, on behalf of the SARS Commission.During Ontario’s epidemic, which lasted from February through June 2003, the disease struck 375 people and killed 44.One of the most glaring breakdowns in worker protections involved controversy about the use of N95 respirators, said the report. Few hospitals complied with a law requiring them to properly train and fit-test employees who used the respirators. The commission also found that some Ontario hospital officials argued against N95 respirator use on the grounds that healthcare workers could safely wear the less expensive surgical masks.”If the Commission has one single take-home message it is the precautionary principle that safety comes first, that reasonable efforts to reduce risk need not await scientific proof,” Campbell said in the report.The commission identified several other shortcomings in Ontario’s response to the crisis, including a lack of infection control expertise, poor communication between public health agencies and hospitals, nonfunctional health and safety committees, blurred authority and accountability, inadequate surveillance, minimization of the role of the Ministry of Labor, and failure to heed the advice of front-line healthcare workers.In analyzing the events in Ontario, the commission several times contrasted the response of Ontario healthcare officials with the response in British Columbia, where a patient was also hospitalized at about the same time for SARS, but no major outbreak occurred.”A combination of worker safety and infection control culture at Vancouver General, with better systemic preparedness, ensured that BC was spared the devastation that befell Ontario,” Campbell pointed out. “The Commission is not surprised that in Vancouver, with its greater systemic awareness of and commitment to worker safety, only one health worker contracted SARS.”A spokesperson for Ontario Health Minister George Smitherman told Canadian Press (CP) the province would heed the commission’s recommendations about the precautionary principle. “We take Justice Campbell’s advice very seriously and we happen to agree with it,” said David Spencer, Smitherman’s press secretary. Smitherman was out of the country and unavailable for comment.Specifically, Spencer said Smitherman supports the use of N95 respirators to protect healthcare workers in the event of an influenza pandemic, though a scientific debate on masks versus respirators continues. “If you take that to the issue of N95s, then that’s something that we think is appropriate in the situation where you’re talking about a pandemic,” Spencer told CP.However, Hilary Short, president of the Ontario Hospital Association, told CP her organization disagrees with the commission on that point. “We believe that you have to be very careful with personal protective equipment to use the science, because it’s really safer to use the level of personal protective equipment that is called for by the science and not lead to the highest level of equipment.”One question the commission examined was whether political pressure influenced how the provincial government handled the SARS outbreak. The panel said it found no evidence of political or economic pressure to minimize or hide SARS or prematurely declare the SARS outbreak over. However, the report said communication between governments, agencies, and hospitals was often poor.”SARS may be the last wake-up call we get before the next major outbreak of infection, whether it turns out to be an influenza pandemic or some other health crisis,” Campbell wrote. “The tragedy of SARS, these stories of unbearable loss and systemic failure, give the public every reason to keep the government’s feet to the fire in order to complete the initiatives already undertaken to make us safer from infectious disease.”See also:SARS Commission final report (Dec 2006)http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/16000/268478.pdfMay 15, 2003 CIDRAP News article “Precautions didn’t protect 9 Toronto hospital workers from SARS”Oct 18, 2006, CIDRAP News story “HHS backs respirator use in caring for pandemic flu patients”last_img read more

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Rowland puts £1m in Artisan

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Be more coherent with COVID-19 announcements, analysts tell Jokowi

first_imgAfter Pratikno waded into the conversation, Fadjroel revised his statement to advise people not to return to their hometowns and added a point about social assistance for informal workers, many of whom have lost their source of income as economic activities slowed in the capital.The statements emerged after Jokowi declared a public health emergency on March 31 and opted for large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) over a territorial quarantine as his preferred method of containing COVID-19.He has since offered cash payouts to the most vulnerable people and shifted the Idul Fitri holiday leave period to the end of the year in the hope of getting people to stay put, experts say.It is hardly the first time officials have been caught contradicting one another in public, but the current lapse during a time of crisis made it clear that a communication protocol was needed, said Arya Fernandes, political researcher at the Centre for Strategic International Studies (CSIS).“It is important for the State Palace to prepare a communication protocol for times of crisis. The public needs trustworthy and sound information that will inspire more trust in the government,” Arya said on Wednesday.On a separate occasion on April 3, presidential expert staff member Ali Mochtar Ngabalin from the Executive Office of the President disclosed to the media that one of its officials had contracted COVID-19. The statement was later corrected by Juri Ardiantoro, acting undersecretary for political information and communication at the Executive Office.In a statement, Juri confirmed that employees of the office had tested positive for the disease in a rapid test, but a later polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, considered to be more reliable, turned out negative.Presidential Chief of Staff Moeldoko did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The confusion caused by these officials indicated that the formulated policies were still rough around the edges, Arya said, suggesting that a clear chain of command in communications would help convey the government’s messages with greater clarity.The President has no shortage of spokespersons, aides and stand-ins. Besides Fadjroel and Pratikno, Jokowi still has Cabinet Secretary Pramono Anung, a former House of Representatives deputy speaker. He also has Moeldoko, Juri and Ali Mochtar at the Executive Office of the President, as well as Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi to speak on international affairs.Jokowi’s own admission in mid-March that the government was deliberately holding back information on COVID-19 cases from the public did not increase its credibility in handling the outbreak, said Kunto Adi Wibobo, executive director of local pollster KedaiKOPI.“Without accurate data, the concern is that the public could be lulled into a false sense of security while we might in actuality be sitting in an emergency [situation],” Kunto told The Jakarta Post.To minimize the potential for future misunderstandings, Kunto said, Jokowi should take the charge in conveying government policy and action in the fight against COVID-19, including by shedding light on the motivations behind certain policy decisions.As of Thursday afternoon, all but one province in Indonesia have confirmed cases of the disease. The government tally of COVID-19 cases has reached 3,293 infections, 280 deaths and 252 recoveries.Topics : After a Cabinet meeting on April 2, presidential spokesperson Fadjroel Rachman released a statement insisting there would be no official ban on the mudik (exodus), the almost annual tradition of millions of Indonesians visiting their hometowns for the Idul Fitri holidays.Travelers, he said, should instead self-isolate for the recommended two-week period and would in the meantime be placed under general observation (ODP) when they arrive in their hometowns.Later that day, State Secretary Pratikno sought to clarify Fadjroel’s statement, saying President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo had actually called on the people not to go back to their hometowns, although he did not categorically state that the President would ban the mudik this year.Later still it was reported that Jokowi said the government had advised people not to return to their hometowns for Idul Fitri in order to contain the spread of the coronavirus. But he again stopped short of issuing stricter orders to prevent people from mobilizing, calling instead for greater community oversight at the village level to observe recent arrivals from Greater Jakarta. The central government could use a more coherent public communication strategy as it looks to address the COVID-19 outbreak in the country, with analysts pointing to deepening frustrations over mixed messages and a failure to effectively convey the seriousness of the situation.Indonesia’s government is coming under increasing pressure to provide transparency and access to information to combat the outbreak, as it scrambles to run an effective crisis response, keep the region’s largest economy afloat and ensure that public order and calm is sustained.One unusual feature of the coronavirus response has been the growing prevalence of officials contradicting one another in public, which has caused confusion in local efforts to curb a pandemic that has seen some 1.6 million people infected and more than 80,000 deaths globally.last_img read more

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