Irish investment industry makes €500,000 donation

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Irish investment industry makes €500,000 donation  166 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Basis.point, the Irish Fund industry’s charitable arm, has committed €500,000 to three educational projects.The basis.point funding has been given to the Early Learning Initiative (ELI), Foróige and Archways and brings the total currently committed to €1.9 million. This is benefiting children across the educational system from 18 months to 18 years.Edel O’Malley of basis.point said: “It is a privilege to deepen our existing relationships with such inspirational educators. ELI and Foróige provide an extraordinary resource for our communities and through our programmes, each year we will positively influence the lives of over 70 families and educational aspirations of over 3000+ young people.”Basis.point started supporting the ELI in 2015. Following positive feedback on the ParentChild+ (formerly Parent Child Home Programme) basis.point increased its funding in 2017, allowing ELI to train additional home visitors in order to increase the capacity of families that could be accommodated in the programme.The latest grant of €225,000, as part of the €500,000 allocation, will allow ELI to continue to run the ParentChild+ programme in Dublin and Limerick and expand the programme to include Ballinasloe in County Galway.  165 total views,  1 views today Howard Lake | 11 February 2020 | News Matched fundingThe ELI will also benefit from a co-funding agreement where €25,000 from basis.point will be matched by real estate company Kennedy Wilson over a five year period, to support the Home from Home programme, aimed at vulnerable families living in temporary accommodation.The second tranche of funding to Foróige will support the running and further rollout of  the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship programme.A supplementary grant of €30,000 has been allocated to Archways to facilitate some refinements that will enhance the effectiveness of their programmes in Wexford and Kilkenny and run an additional mentoring training course in Cork.Archways will also benefit from a €25,000 co-funding agreement with Kennedy Wilson.Aidan Tiernan, Chairman of the Disbursements Committee, said: “These latest grants further ensure that we are supporting educationally disadvantaged children through-out the whole of Ireland, with over 60% of our investment now allocated for children living outside of the Dublin area.”Currently basis.point has over 300 patrons and supporters in the industry and is supported by asset managers, service providers, professional firms and independent directors of the Irish Investment Fund and Asset Management Industry. Tagged with: corporate fundraising Ireland matched giving About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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‘Remember that our people always, always resisted’

first_imgFollowing are the full remarks of Mahtowin Munro, co-leader of United American Indians of New England, at the 46th annual Day of Mourning rally in Plymouth, Mass., on Nov. 26. To hear her talk, visit tinyurl.com/hga5975.  Mahtowin MunroWW photo: Liz GreenWe want to give a shout-out to those who are observing Unthanksgiving at Alcatraz Island this morning and to all our people everywhere who are taking the time to mourn our ancestors instead of celebrating thanksgiving. We understand that there was a sunrise ceremony in Washington state this morning and that people in Baltimore are spending an hour right now honoring National Day of Mourning and also supporting Walmart workers there; and there are small observances happening in many places all around the country and the world. We welcome everyone who has traveled here as family. New York City is in the house! Thank you to the International Action Center for bringing a bus from Manhattan once again. There is also a Haitian community bus that came from Brooklyn. Merci a Daoud et notres amies Haitiennes. We want to welcome our union sisters and brothers from Local 8751 Boston School Bus Drivers who help us with the logistics every year, no matter what. And in this time of rampant Islamophobia in many quarters throughout the world, we want to give a special welcome to our Muslim friends who are here today.Now let us all focus together on our ancestors and come together.  ]Today we mourn the loss of our Mashpee sister, Constance “Lone Eagless” Cromwell, who stood proudly at National Day of Mourning for decades. We remember Sam Sapiel, Wamsutta Frank James, all the elders who came before us and who have passed into the spirit world. When the Europeans came into our harbors with their little boats, no one could have imagined the destruction that would follow. So many Native people died so rapidly that scientists now say it caused planetary climate change. Millions of living beings, animals, insects, birds, fish, plants were wiped out by the ravages of European colonialism. The land and water and sky have been violated. All of this is in our hearts as we stand here today. ‘Government continues to oppress us’Indigenous people are largely erased in mainstream media, in government statistics, in discussions of race and racism. Additionally, we have to deal with disrespect and cultural appropriation — that is what happens when people rip off our cultures and designs, or when you see pop stars and white kids at music festivals wearing fake headdresses.But we resist this erasure at every opportunity, whether it is by public awareness events like today or by teaching our languages and cultures to our children. There is still a lot of racism directed toward us by hateful people, the same kind of people who want to keep waving their confederate flags. They don’t care that our Native youth have the highest suicide rate in the country — in fact, some bigots joke about things like this. These bigots ignore or mock the extreme disparities in health, housing, education and income that Indigenous people face daily. Even when we speak loud and clear for everyone to hear on an issue that should be a matter of simple human decency — when we say that schools and sports teams need to stop using racist mascots and team names — some white people refuse to listen.  This past year, President Obama expressed concern about the conditions of Indigenous people in the U.S. We will see whether any of these government efforts will last very long, but it has at least given hope to some youth that they will not continue to be ignored. Some youth from this area, including my son, were at the White House Gathering for Tribal Youth this summer, and were awestruck to see Michelle Obama there. We cannot forget, though, that this is the same government that continues to oppress us, to treat us as subject people rather than as sovereign nations, and to steal, exploit and devastate our lands for its own benefit. It is the same government that keeps our brother Leonard Peltier in prison for nearly 40 years now. Leonard Peltier, an innocent man, was framed up by the FBI. We really need people to get behind an all-out effort to demand clemency from President Obama, who could pardon Leonard rather than a turkey. We will have a message from Leonard a little later in the program. We pray today for all of our sisters and brothers in prison. Additionally, we are glad to note that the right to participate in sweat lodge ceremonies will now be legally restored to Native prisoners in Massachusetts as a result of a court decision two days ago.Violence and sexual assault against Native women continues to be rampant.  Usually, it is by a non-Native man who is then often not prosecuted. At least one out of three Native women report having been sexually assaulted. In Canada, there is a push for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit People. Thousands of Indigenous women are trafficked, missing or murdered in Mexico and the U.S. as well. We pray today for them and their families. This violence against women is deeply tied to the violence against the earth that has happened since the first day of the European invasion. I pray too for transgender people, who honored a Trans Day of Remembrance this week. We have talked for many years here about how much we all hate Columbus Day. The campaign to abolish Columbus Day and declare the second Monday in October to be Indigenous Peoples Day has really gained ground this past year, with cities ranging from Albuquerque to Seattle to Ann Arbor coming on board. And we are happy to announce that we are initiating a campaign for this in both Cambridge and Boston, with the support of some folks from the North American Indian Center of Boston. We will have a lot more information to share about this at a later date and will seek everyone’s help and support, so please make sure to follow us on social media for updates.Some of you here went on the Justice Or Else march in D.C. last month. That march was amazing in part because it did so much to strengthen the links between Black and Brown people. This understanding will grow stronger.Due largely to the work of Black Lives Matter and other Black-led movements, this year has been one in which awareness about deaths by police and in custody have been brought to the forefront nationally. And before I say anything else, I want to say: BLACK LIVES MATTER! Some of you may be surprised to learn that Native people are over-incarcerated and have very high rates of deaths by police and deaths in custody, comparable to rates experienced by Black people in the U.S. I know that some people now are using the slogan Native Lives Matter — not meaning to appropriate the term from Black people so much as to draw attention to what is happening to our people, too. You may not have even heard about the cases of Native people who have died — Paul Castaway in Denver, Sarah Lee Circle Bear in South Dakota, many more — so please learn more about this after you leave today. This is not something that just started happening recently. Some of you here will painfully remember that a Mashpee man, David Hendricks, was shot by the police back in 1988. We pray for all of the victims of state violence and their families, that they will find justice.On frontlines of environmental struggles Throughout the Americas, Indigenous people are on the frontlines of many struggles against pipelines, fracking, mining, tar sands. This is because many of these projects are going directly through or near our treaty lands. President Obama recently turned down the Keystone XL Pipeline project after more than six years of silence on it, and that was great news. That victory came about because of the steadfast resistance of Indigenous people and allies, and there are many more fights to come. For instance, right here in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, there have been struggles against a company called Spectra and their natural gas operations. Everywhere, everywhere, Indigenous people have been talking about the sacred water — walking for the sacred water. We cannot live without water, water that is being poisoned and wasted.  In August, the Environmental Protection Agency caused a toxic mine spill in Colorado that led mining poisons to be unleashed on the Colorado, Animas and San Juan rivers. The portion of the Navajo Nation along there could no longer draw water for livestock and crops, and farmers wept at the sight of their crops wilting. Despite urgent pleas, federal government agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency have refused to give the Navajo Nation the help that it needs to deal with and recover from this disaster.In Arizona, John McCain and other corrupt politicians have signed Oak Flat, a sacred Apache site, over to a mining company. We must work to reverse that. In Hawaii, the University of Hawaii wants to build the world’s largest telescope atop sacred Mauna Kea, but Native Hawaiians and allies have been doing everything possible to protect Mauna Kea and stop that from happening.The struggles of Native people do not end at the border with Canada or Mexico. There is a lot going on in Canada (though not enough time to talk about it). Some of you may know that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission presented its report about the Indian residential schools this past year. The suffering and genocide caused by the residential schools continue to resonate in many lives and communities in the U.S. as well.In Mexico, Indigenous students and many other people have been murdered by government forces in Ayotzinapa and elsewhere.  Some of us consider Palestinians to be our Indigenous cousins; our histories have so many parallels, and they continue to endure daily violence, the theft of their land, the destruction of their homes, the murder of their children. In Australia, in Brazil, in country after country, Aboriginal people are dealing with many of the same issues that we deal with here. We pray for and stand in solidarity with all of them.Help youth make a better worldI feel that my first obligation is as a mother. That obligation is not only to my children and grandchildren, but to all the youth, to support them and help them make a better world. Some of us believe that this generation of youth will really be able to make change in the world and lead the way. We can see that happening already, with Native youth providing leadership on matters in their own communities and bringing some reality into international discussions on climate change. Indigenous students also are an important part of the inspiring fightbacks against racism happening on campuses all over the country, including Native students in this region at UMass, Brown, Dartmouth, Yale, Harvard and elsewhere.I keep hearing that those of us who have suffered from racism, violence and genocide experience something called intergenerational trauma. The trauma keeps reverberating. I read that what we have suffered can even change our DNA. The history we talk about here is not just something we can forget about. It is with us every day. It is literally in our bones and our blood, in every cell.  But I do believe that we can heal and transform when we talk about these things, come together in community, work together to decolonize our minds and make a better world, just as we are doing today.       To our beautiful, inspiring Native youth, I say: Learn about and remember what your ancestors went through to bring you here. Remember that our people always, always, always resisted. Remember too that we are so proud of you, because you are becoming the generation that our ancestors dreamed of.  FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Is Real Estate America’s Favorite Form of Investment?

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Is Real Estate America’s Favorite Form of Investment? The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Is Real Estate America’s Favorite Form of Investment? Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Joey Pizzolato July 19, 2017 1,272 Views Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Joey Pizzolato is the Online Editor of DS News and MReport. He is a graduate of Spalding University, where he holds a holds an MFA in Writing as well as DePaul University, where he received a B.A. in English. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in a variety of print and online journals and magazines. To contact Pizzolato, email [email protected] in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, News Tagged with: Bankrate Gold real estate Stockscenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: An Unlikely Pair Next: Holding the Line Related Articles Bankrate Gold real estate Stocks 2017-07-19 Joey Pizzolato The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Real Estate is American’s favorite long-term investment, according to a recent poll by Bankrate. In its Financial Security Index, which was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International, they asked 1,002 adults via telephone—for money that wouldn’t be touched for at least 10 years—what did they think was the best investment?Twenty-eight percent said real estate, while cash investments came in a close second at 23 percent. Bringing up the rear was the stock market, at 17 percent; gold, at 15 percent; and bonds at 4 percent. Six percent of those polled answered “other.” Bankrate suggests that the reason real estate is the favorite is three-fold: rising home prices, perpetually low interest rates, and tax incentives. Plus, there’s the added bonus of having a place to call home, permanently.However, in terms of return on investment, real estate historically doesn’t have the highest yield. Bankrate cites a study by professors at the London School of Business that showed average returns on housing was only 1.3 percent annually, and notoriously difficult to sell even in a strong market. In comparison, stocks usually returned four times that amount.This doesn’t seem to matter, although, there is a slight generational gap when it comes to the idea that real estate is the best investment. More Gen Xers and Baby Boomers believe real estate is a better investment than millennials that do, but not by a large margin. Millennials are split in their vote—30 percent for cash investment, and 30 percent for real estate investment. One reason for this could be that real estate is less risky when compared to stocks, and because millennials have less wealth that their predecessors, are less willing to play with it and take risks?Real estate, in that sense, is a safe investment, especially when compared to other routes. Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

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Google Pledges $1 Billion to Fund Affordable Housing.

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Google Pledges $1 Billion to Fund Affordable Housing. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Google Pledges $1 Billion to Fund Affordable Housing. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Investment, News Affordability Google 2019-06-19 Seth Welborn Related Articles Previous: The Fed’s Decision on Interest Rates Next: What’s Driving Delinquency Rates? Google has announced that it will spend $1 billion on efforts aimed at increasing affordable housing in the San Francisco Bay area. Part of the plan is to utilize some of Google’s land.The company plans to use around $750 million worth of commercially zoned land it owns over the next 10 years. The second part of Google’s plan, over the next ten years, Google will establish a $250 million investment fund aimed at providing incentives to enable developers to build at least 5,000 affordable housing units across the market.“Today, Google is one of the Bay Area’s largest employers,” said Google CEO Sundar Pichai in a statement. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing. The lack of new supply, combined with the rising cost of living, has resulted in a severe shortage of affordable housing options for long-time middle and low income residents. As Google grows throughout the Bay Area—whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale—we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities.”The Bay Area is one of the most expensive areas in the country. Despite a 39% increase in inventory and an ongoing increase in affordability within the San Francisco Bay area, many homeowners and potential homeowners are still finding the area unaffordable. Google hopes its plan will address the shortage of affordable housing options for long-time middle and low income residents, as inventory continues to slip in California.According to CoreLogic, the six-county Southern California region recorded a 14.1% decrease in new and existing home sales in March, and San Francisco reported just 6,124 new and existing home sales occurred in March, resulting in a 14.8% decline year-over-year. To combat the new and existing home sales problems, Pichai states that Google will “work with local municipalities to support plans that allow residential developers to build quickly and economically.” Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago June 19, 2019 1,062 Views Tagged with: Affordability Google The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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Donegal man elected General Secretary of the INTO

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Donegal man elected General Secretary of the INTO Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebookcenter_img Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Twitter Previous articleMain Evening News, Sport and Obituaries on Tuesday December 18thNext articleFinn Harps and Superior MICAD Security link up News Highland Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp By News Highland – December 18, 2018 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Donegal man John Boyle has been elected the new General Secretary of the Irish National Teachers Organisation.The current General Secretary Sheila Nunan announced her intention to step down from the position in September 2019 triggering an election which three people contested.18,147 members of the union cast a ballot in the election with John winning (9,542) 52.6% of the vote on the first count. Deirdre O’Connor secured (3,493) 19.3% of the vote and Alison Gilliland received (5,112) 28.2% of the vote.Mr Boyle will take up office as General Secretary Designate in March 2019 and will take over as General Secretary in 2019.John Boyle was born in Mullaghduff, Co Donegal and now lives with his wife Carmel in Templeogue, Dublin. He has been an INTO activist for over 30 years. He was a staff representative branch and district chairperson and has served on the Central Executive Committee since 2004 representing members in 300 Wicklow and South Dublin schools. John was elected to the position of INTO President for 2017-18.Speaking following his election Mr Boyle said:“I have a clear vision for the INTO over the next decade. We must be bold and ambitious in demanding the level of investment in education, North and South, that will remove the inequities that currently exist and give every teacher and pupil the room to bloom. We must grow in membership and influence, strengthening ties with sister unions and professional organisations and delivering additional services to members.I am humbled and immensely grateful to have received the support of so many members. Whether you voted for me, or one of the other fine candidates in this election, I will be your General Secretary. I intend to be a leader that brings members together and holds Government to account.” Facebooklast_img read more

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Honoring Mexican discovery

first_imgOn a cool October evening, the pre-eminent Mexican archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma regaled the audience gathered at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City with accounts of the discoveries at Templo Mayor, the main Aztec temple there.While a screen showed images of ritual offerings, effigies depicting gods, and remains of human sacrifices, including a massive, skull-covered wall, Matos explained how all those findings helped people understand the cosmology of the Aztecs, one of the world’s great civilizations.Matos spoke at the inaugural lecture of the Eduardo Matos Moctezuma Lecture Series, a joint initiative of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS), Harvard Divinity School, and the Moses Mesoamerican Archive and Research Project to honor the archaeologist’s achievements.The five-year lecture series, which will allow scholars who study Mexico to present their work in Mexico and at Harvard, was an initiative of David Carrasco, the Neil L. Rudenstine Professor for the Study of Latin America, who teaches at Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Extension School, and in the Department of Anthropology.Carrasco met Matos in 1976, and the two have since collaborated on joint publications and projects on Mesoamerican history and religion. Carrasco considers Matos his mentor and one of Mexico’s major cultural figures for his role in shaping national identity, he said at the event.Carrasco quoted, in his remarks, an enthusiastic Mexican cabdriver who told him, “Matos Moctezuma showed us, Mexicans, who we really are when he uncovered the Great Temple.”A professor emeritus at Mexico’s National School of Anthropology and History, Matos led the excavations of the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlán for 40 years after it was accidentally discovered by electrical workers in 1978. His work unveiled for the first time the ritual heart of the Aztec empire, and helped people better understand the Aztecs, the people ruled by warfare and agriculture who built Tenochtitlán into one of the world’s largest cities in the 16th century.The Matos Moctezuma lecture is the first at Harvard to honor a Mexican, said Carrasco, and the series seeks to build and strengthen existing educational and research ties with Mexico.“We’re here to mark the partnership between Professors Carrasco and Matos,” said Mark Elliott, Harvard’s vice provost for international affairs and Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History, who led a University delegation to Mexico City. “I have seen some other great partnerships too, because when our faculty come to work here, they do not work alone. They work together.”Among those who traveled with Elliott to Mexico City were Brian Farrell, DRCLAS director and professor of organismic and evolutionary biology, and David Hempton, dean of Harvard Divinity School and Alonzo L. McDonald Family Professor of Evangelical Theological Studies and John Lord O’Brian Professor of Divinity.The lecture series is supported by José Antonio Alonso Espinosa, a Mexican donor whose family founded a history museum in Puebla, and it highlights the importance of cultural institutions such as museums or universities, said Elliot.“Cultural institutions matter because they are the repositories of our values as people and as a people,” said Elliot. “And when it sometimes happens that our other institutions, political institutions, perhaps, or economic institutions, let us down or falter or lead us to wonder where they may be going, our cultural institutions remain steady and point the way forward. This is why we nurture them, this why we support them.”last_img read more

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EU pressures AstraZeneca to deliver vaccines as promised

first_imgBRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has lashed out Monday at pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, accusing the pharmaceutical company of failing to guarantee coronavirus vaccines without valid explanation and threatened to impose tight controls within days on COVID-19 vaccines exports made in the bloc. Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said the EU  “will take any action required to protect its citizens and its rights,”  Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said. The EU, which has 450 million citizens and the economic and political clout of the world’s biggest trading bloc, is lagging badly behind countries like Israel and Britain in rolling out coronavirus vaccine shots for its health care workers and most vulnerable people.last_img

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Canadian judge denies bail for fashion mogul Peter Nygard

first_imgWINNIPEG, Manitoba (AP) — A judge has denied bail to Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard. Nygard was arrested in December on U.S. charges alleging he sexually abused women and girls after luring them with promises of opportunities in fashion and modeling over the last 25 years. Justice Shawn Greenberg says she has concerns about a history of Nygard not showing up to court and using employees to tamper with evidence. He was arrested in December in Winnipeg under the Extradition Act and faces nine counts in the Southern District of New York.last_img

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Cherry Jones & Denis O’Hare Will Announce 2015 Drama League Award Nominees

first_img View Comments Tony Award winners Cherry Jones and Denis O’Hare will announce the nominees for the 2015 Drama League Awards on April 21 at Sardi’s. The competitive categories include Distinguished Production of a Play, Distinguished Production of a Musical, Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Revival of a Musical, as well as the Distinguished Performance Award.As previously reported, the League will also give special recognition to Tony and Oscar winner Joel Grey, Tony and Olivier-winning director Stephen Daldry and WNET’s Neal Shapiro and David Horn. The ceremony will take place on May 15 in the Broadway Ballroom at the Marriott Marquis Times Square. A host will be announced soon.First awarded in 1922 and formalized in 1935, The Drama League Awards are the oldest theatrical honors in America. Unlike most awards, the Drama League only uses one category to recognize specific performances. Recent recipients include Neil Patrick Harris, Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald.last_img read more

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Kyle Scatliffe, Isaiah Johnson & Joaquina Kalukango Set for Color Purple

first_img Kyle Scatliffe Joaquina Kalukango The Color Purple Related Shows View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 8, 2017 Star Files Olivier nominee Kyle Scatliffe will “Push Da Button” alongside fellow Broadway alums Isaiah Johnson and Joaquina Kalukango in The Color Purple revival. Starring the previously reported Oscar winner Jennifer Hudson, Cynthia Erivo and Danielle Brooks, the John Doyle-helmed musical will begin performances on November 10. Opening night is scheduled for December 10 at Broadway’s Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre.Scatliffe will play Harpo; he was most recently seen in Les Miserables on Broadway and he received an Olivier nod for his performance in The Scottsboro Boys in London. Johnson is set to take on the role of Mister; his Great White Way credits include Side Show, Peter and the Starcatcher and The Merchant of Venice. On screen Johnson has been seen in Person of Interest and The Knick. Kalukango will appear as Nettie; she recently featured in the Encores! Wild Party and on Broadway in Holler If Ya Hear Me and Godspell.The Color Purple features a book by Marsha Norman, lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray and music by Russell and Willis. Based on the novel by Alice Walker, the tuner tells the story of Celie (Erivo), a woman who, through love, finds the strength to triumph over adversity and discovers her voice in the world. Hudson will take on the role of Shug Avery and Brooks will play Sofia.Doyle’s stripped-down production opened at the Menier Chocolate Factory in London on July 15, 2013, starring Erivo. The new staging cuts approximately 30 minutes of material from the original incarnation and its producers include Oprah Winfrey.Check out Broadway.com’s exclusive interview with Hudson, Erivo, Brooks and Doyle below.last_img read more

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