2017 Is Over But 2018 Is Here To Keep It Going

first_imgWell that was an interesting year! So lets wrap it up in style and start making some predictions for what to expect next year and how we can top it because everything needs to go up and to the right.The bigger seed rounds will continue. As I mentioned in my previous post, micro funds raised were at an all-time high and yet deal volume didn’t increase, just the average round sizes. Along with the mega VC funds who are coming down stream, the seed and series A rounds will continue to grow in size (hard for them to write small checks) as they double down and provide more capital to their investments.More liquidity through IPOs / M&A. With the stock market at all-time highs, relatively successful tech IPOs in 2017 (Roku, Stitchfix) and hopefully a tax cut that will increase profits and repatriate billions, we should see some increased activity here. Once there is more liquidity, you can bet it will be reinvested — when it rains, it pours. Unfortunately the affects of this will be delayed into 2019 as lockups end. You can see a list of about 60 IPOs from this year to see how much they’ve raised and since they’ve started here.VR/AR will need more time. This got a lot of hype and has yet to deliver but I dont think major consumer adoption will happen next year. Yes Magic Leap announced their “One” sometime next year but the biggest problem I see is their “premium” price point and lack of content. Even if another major tech company announces their product next year, I think this is more a 2019ish inflection. Maybe the movie Ready Player One (love the books!) can give it a little bit of a sales bump.eSports will level up. 2017 was a great year of hype for the industry that I feel will finally start to pay off with substantial revenue. Yes there are huge prize purses, sold out stadiums and a league was formed (OWL) but 2018 will drive the big brands into the industry via sponsorships and streaming rights, which means $$$. That’s only if the publishers (Activision Blizzard, RIOT etc) that own it all play nice.Blockchain/ICO something will finally deliver a product and be disappointing. This isn’t a knock at it but a realistic point of view as it’s an unsexy back-end technology that can change our “internet” fundamentally but doesn’t have any real consumer day-to-day use. I’m only saying this as it’s all the rage right now but as a normal person, we’ll end up using it unknowingly if it all works out seamlessly. Interest in this space will continue to increase even as scams and failures occur — just be careful!Increased frontier tech investments in all the jargon words. More specifically in robotics, AI, autonomous cars and space, all things that I like to say “have to” happen eventually. Most of the talent/resources will still be locked up at the big tech companies but expect a few notable acqu-hires and a handful of breakout fundings.BREAKING: Media will be in for another tough year. It was a rough end of year for media with Buzzfeed missing their targets and Mashable being sold significantly below their last valuation and some other publications laying off journalists. Don’t expect many reports of media companies being funded, though a few like Axios and Cheddar may lead the way to show you can build a growth-able brand. Basically Huffpo/Business insider were false positives in the industry and Facebook/Google aren’t done taking all the $. Media will have to start looking for revenue in new places or be forced to consolidate more.Now time for some crazy and fun predictions:Apple and/or Microsoft will get in a bidding war for Magic Leap. This will allow Apple to compete with everyone else with a complete phone, watch and headset / haven’t heard much about the HaloLens and didn’t like the demo very much. Or Softbank will just give them another few billion because they will need it.Politics will try to regulate the big tech companies with no effect. We’ll see which though really tried to fight Net Neutrality and who was just doing it for PR then…There will be a “tech backlash” verbally but we’re too addicted to social media and it will only get worse before it gets better. Big brands ad $$$ is the major catalyst here so we need to appeal to them if we want any change.Amazon will announce something with autonomous cars.Things I want to work on:Read more books — thank you everyone for the great listsDelete all the useless/mindless games on my phone that are a waste of time.Office hours to help more people — my email is t@nyvp.com. This is more for advising, less potential investments.Spend less time on Facebook/Instagram — basically don’t open around people and scroll aimlessly.Call and see friends more — texting/emailing is nice but a call or face to face is always better. 2017 Is Over But 2018 Is Here To Keep It GoingJanuary 4, 2018 by Trace Cohen 321SHARESFacebookTwitterLinkedin Filed Under: #NYCTech, AlleyTalk, Op-EDcenter_img Reprinted by permission.PREVIOUS POSTNEXT POSTlast_img read more

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BP discovered a billion barrels of oil in the Gulf of Mexico

first_imgThe British energy company has discovered 1 billion barrels of crude at an existing oilfield in the Gulf of Mexico. BP also announced two new offshore oil discoveries and a major new investment in a nearby field.BP is the Gulf of Mexico’s biggest producer, and it’s making strides to hold that title.BP now expects its fossil fuel output from the region to reach 400,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day by the middle of the next decade. Today, it produces about 300,000 boepd, up from less than 200,000 boepd about five years ago.The company said it will spend $1.3 billion to develop a third phase of its Atlantis field off the coast of New Orleans. Scheduled to start production in 2020, the eight new wells will add 38,000 bpd to BP’s production at Atlantis. The decision comes after BP found another 400 million barrels of oil at the field.BP made the massive 1 billion-barrel discovery at its Thunder Horse field off the tip of Louisiana.Executives are crediting their investment in advanced seismic technology and data processing for speeding up the company’s ability to confirm the discoveries at Atlantis and Thunder Horse. BP says it once would have taken a year to analyze the Thunder Horse data, but it now takes just weeks.“We are building on our world-class position, upgrading the resources at our fields through technology, productivity and exploration success,” Bernard Looney, BP’s chief executive for production and exploration, said in a statement.Just northeast of Thunder Horse, BP also announced new discoveries at fields near its Na Kika platform.BP says it plans to develop reservoirs at its Manuel prospect, where Shell holds a 50 percent stake. Producers also found oil at the Nearly Headless Nick prospect near Na Kika, where BP has a 20.25 percent working interest. BP discovers 1 billion barrels of oil at its Thunder Horse field in the Gulf of Mexico.The oil giant also says it will spend $1.3 billion to develop a third phase of its Atlantis offshore field south of New Orleans.BP credits its investment in advanced seismic technology for speeding up its ability to confirm the discoveries. London best pest control center_img BP’s investment in next-generation technology just paid off to the tune of a billion barrels of oil.last_img read more

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Amazons botched plan to build a second headquarters in Long Island City

first_img by Ultimate Software Sponsored Content CEO Initiative 2019: A Conversation About CapitalismFormer IMF chief economist and head of India’s central bank Raghuram Rajan argues that capitalism needs both top-down reforms and bottom-up policies to maintain trust in a market economy. ShareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseMuteCurrent Time 0:01/Duration 18:49Loaded: 2.63%00:02Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -18:48 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhen Amazon announced plans to build HQ2 back in 2017, mayors and state governors clambered over each other in a bid to impress the multi-billion dollar tech giant.Kansas City’s mayor bought 1,000 products from Amazon, while Birmingham scattered giant Amazon boxes throughout the city. States including New Jersey, New York, and Virginia meanwhile offered tax or cash incentives all under the assumption that the project, which is expected to add 50,000 jobs to the communities with $5 billion in investments, would be a boon to their constituents.But communicating with those constituents is where Amazon fell short and failed to land its first choice, says Former IMF Chief Economist and current Professor of Finance at The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, Raghuram Rajan.Amazon had focused on talking with higher level politicians, and not enough on addressing one of the communities that would eventually house HQ2: Long Island City in Queens New York.“Every mayor and every governor was killing for (HQ2)…and yet Long Island City and Queens said ‘Sorry, we’re not interested,’” he said Tuesday during The Fortune CEO Initiative conference in New York City. “Why did they say no? The first thing was that Amazon never talked to the community in detail before announcing it. They should have said: ‘Here are your worries, here’s how we deal with them, and here’s our plan for the community.”In late 2018, Amazon revealed that it had chosen two locations for HQ2: Long Island City and Arlington, Va. But the Seattle-based e-commerce firm kept the process relatively mum to the public. That didn’t prevent onlookers from observing that the entry of such an affluent tech giant could drive up prices and rents in the city where it eventually decides to lay down a second set of roots.Amazon would have achieved better success had it assured existing residents that they would not be displaced due to rising rents and prices, and opened up about potential benefits to the local community prior to the announcement, he said. “These are the conversations that didn’t happen,” Rajan said.To Rajan, the failed negotiations between Amazon and Long Island City is part of a larger trend that threatens the current state of capitalism: An over centralization of power. As a tech revolution sweeps through the world, making jobs in some industries and cities obsolete, localities should be given the reins in deciding how to deal with their unique challenges—not the federal government.And the former IMF Chief Economist sees signs of this trend everywhere.“What is Brexit about? It’s about taking back control—from London it had migrated to Brussels,” he said.More must-read stories from Fortune:—Fortune CEO Initiative 2019: Watch the livestream—These communication tools can radically improve workplaces—Four ways algorithms can boost diversity in hiring—Find out which Fortune 500 CEOs are most admired by their peers—Uber’s CEO has absorbed the COO role for more controlGet up to speed on your morning commute with Fortune’s CEO Daily newsletter.You May Like A Work Culture Built for All Generations HealthFormer GE CEO Jeff Immelt: To Combat Costs, CEOs Should Run Health Care Like a BusinessHealthFor Edie Falco, an ‘Attitude of Gratitude’ After Surviving Breast CancerLeadershipGhosn Back, Tesla Drop, Boeing Report: CEO Daily for April 4, 2019AutosElon Musk’s Plan to Boost Tesla Sales Is Dealt a SetbackMPWJoe Biden, Netflix Pregnancy Lawsuit, Lesley McSpadden: Broadsheet April 4last_img read more

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Employees are protesting how YouTube handles homophobic speech

first_imgInside Google’s Civil WarEmployees are pushing back against the company’s handling of sexual harassment claims and the secretive Dragonfly and Project Maven.ShareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:42Loaded: 1.70%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:42 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PauseMuteCurrent Time 0:03/Duration 0:15Loaded: 0%0:03Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:12 Playback Rate1xFullscreenSan Francisco Pride organizers say they won’t ban Google from the annual Pride Parade on Sunday, despite receiving a letter signed by almost 100 Google employees concerned about how their company handles hate speech.The employees asked for Google to be banned from the pride parade on June 30th. The company came under fire this month for refusing to remove homophobic videos targeting a journalist. Instead, YouTube banned hate speech and demonetized the channel. However, the company still offered a platform for the pundit, Steven Crowder, to direct his viewers to a site to purchase merchandise.“Whenever we press for change, we are told only that the company will ‘take a hard look at these policies,’” the letter says. “But we are never given a commitment to improve, and when we ask when these improvements will be made, we are always told to be patient.”San Francisco Pride organizers acknowledged that Google and Youtube “must do more to elevate and protect the voices of LGBTQ+ creators,” but said Google “has been a considerate partner for a number of years.”“As we commemorate the roots of our movement in resistance, we also understand that San Francisco Pride has become synonymous with the values of inclusion and acceptance,” organizers said in a statement. “In the spirit of community and growth, we confirm Google as a continued participant in the 2019 SF Pride Parade.”A Google spokesman told Fortune the company has “marched in the San Francisco Pride Parade for more than a decade, and we are excited to continue the tradition this weekend.”The decision comes after Google employees were asked to not protest on the company’s float, but were reminded they are welcome to if they march in a personal capacity, outside of the Google contingent.It’s a tradition for many tech companies, including Google, Amazon, Apple, and many others, to sponsor floats during San Francisco’s Pride parade for LGBTQ employees, allies, and executives who want to participate in the festive event. Apple CEO Tim Cook, the most prominent openly gay CEO in the United States, has previously made an appearance at the parade with Apple’s team.More must-read stories from Fortune:—The fall and rise of VR: The struggle to make virtual reality get real—“It’s just lazy”: Current’s CEO on Facebook Calibra’s similar logo—Slack went public without an IPO. Here’s how a direct offering works—Welcome to the next generation of corporate phishing scams—Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 DailyCatch up with Data Sheet, Fortune‘s daily digest on the business of tech.You May Like Sponsored Content Haier Smart Home Has the Solutions by Qingdao Haier HealthFormer GE CEO Jeff Immelt: To Combat Costs, CEOs Should Run Health Care Like a BusinessHealthFor Edie Falco, an ‘Attitude of Gratitude’ After Surviving Breast CancerLeadershipGhosn Back, Tesla Drop, Boeing Report: CEO Daily for April 4, 2019AutosElon Musk’s Plan to Boost Tesla Sales Is Dealt a SetbackMPWJoe Biden, Netflix Pregnancy Lawsuit, Lesley McSpadden: Broadsheet April 4last_img read more

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The Ideal Path to Expansion Stage Growth

first_imgJust got back from having lunch with a CEO of a Provo-based software company. It was a fascinating discussion. We were neck deep in talking about his operation and how he built up the business organically through the start-up phase. It struck me that his company has all the key characteristics we look for as expansion stage software VCs.Key Characteristics of Expansion Stage Software CompaniesBuild your business organically through the start-up phaseIn our book, an ideal company coming out of the start-up phase is one that is set up with a differentiated solution that:… addresses a critical customer pain point…… in a very big market…… and is sold through a profitable distribution model…… resulting in a company that can scale with capital efficiencyGetting to this ideal is very difficult, and takes years of tinkering with the product and the distribution model… and most importantly, it requires a very attentive ear to the customer.So the less money a start-up has, the more the founders will be focused on what the customer is looking for (otherwise they won’t pay), and the more focused they will be on figuring out the lowest distribution cost possible, which invariably instills the right business discipline in the founders.If you have to raise venture funding at the start-up phase, raise as little of it as possible, raise it little by little, and don’t raise it from a large VC fund. Remember, money corrupts.Focus on a pain point that lots of people haveFor a pain point to be truly painful, it has to be one that impedes a business or person from growing (either economically, physically or spiritually). Find the source of the pain and tune your solution to relieving it in a novel way. Many founders start off with a technology based widget, and go out to sell it as the next best thing since sliced bread. Only to find that customers are not looking for widgets, they are looking for solutions to address their pain. Sell your product as a pain killer, not as technology.Make the customer your product managerAs a founding team, it is natural to want to be visionary, to want to come up with something that no one else has thought of. But right after that, start listening to your early customers and figure out how your visionary technology is actually going to turn into a solution to a problem that they have. Trust that success is not about the coolest technology. It is about the most novel way of solving a customer’s problem. So listen and tinker, listen and tinker, then listen and tinker… until you’ve solved the most acute pain felt by the largest number of people possible.Build the lowest cost distribution modelNow that you have built the right solution that addresses the pain of lots of people, you need to figure out a way to reach them online and a way to sell them online or over the phone. Work really hard to find ways to reach your prospects organically (read up on content management marketing). Tune your website to scream out your prospects’ pain points and how you resolve them. Use online lead scoring to filter the best leads. Use a lead qualification team to qualify the leads for an inside sales team. Price and position your solution to be sold over the phone, and resist the temptation of building an expensive field sales team. Here’s my post on building profitable distribution models.Focus on your customer on-boarding and renewal processesI have seen so many companies get into the expansion stage with heavy focus on new customer acquisition only to wake up a year later with 50% or worse renewal rates. The customer engagement model does NOT end with a sale. That is when it begins. Make sure that you have a clear customer on-boarding process that starts before the sale is completely closed (determine who the users will be, get commitment to post-sale training, etc.). Have an on-boarding team that is held accountable for getting customers ramped up within the first 90-days. Once on-boarded, customers need to be handed off to account managers that specialize in building relationships with customers over time, making sure that they are using the product effectively and that they are happy enough to renew and buy more when the time comes.Be obsessive about processRecognize that a software business is an engineered system. It has inputs and outputs, and lots of mechanics in between. It is a living system that needs constant feeding, nurturing, maturing and waste removal. Focus your business growth strategies on engineering the right mix of people, process and systems. Measure and tinker, measure and tinker, then tinker some more.Focus on the one or two most acute bottlenecks to growth at a timeDon’t try to do too much. Relieving a third or fourth bottleneck won’t buy you any more… and de-focuses you from removing your top one or two bottlenecks.Be happyIf you are not enjoying building your business, figure out why and solve it. If you can’t find happiness, move on to something where you would. Life’s too short.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis1last_img read more

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The Race to Acquire Talent is OnWhy not Go Big

first_imgOver the past few months, I have been shocked by the number of acquisitions in the digital media space for talent. It looks like GOOG and Facebook are having such a hard time recruiting top quality talent they need to go buy them. This is a great outcome for talented engineers, but I am worried about the precedence it sets for the innovation economy.According to Wikipedia, GOOG has acquired 76 companies since inception, including 16 this year alone, and we still have four months left. Outside of ITA and Slide, all of these deals are sub $100MM, and most are sub $50MM acquisition prices.On the Facebook side, they recently acquired Chai Labs for $10MM. The founder of Chai Labs, Gokul Rajaram, by all accounts is an incredibly talented engineer (read the Godfather of Adsense), but I just don’t totally understand why they needed to acquire that company. Did they need him that badly that they were willing to buy a company that hadn’t hit its stride? I don’t know all of these expansion stage businesses intimately, but my sense is that none of them outside of ITA have more than $10MM in revenues. Clearly Facebook and GOOG are not making buy decisions based on financial impact and business growth strategies.Separately, this isn’t good for venture capital firms and large VC funds when two large acquirers are actively buying companies before they can mature and generate meaningful returns. This actually incents the founders to start a business, take limited capital and wait for the check versus focusing on building a big, great company.At the end of the day, if you are a talented engineer in the digital space, you are clearly better served to start a company than interview at GOOG or Facebook. If they like you, they will buy you, and $10MM surely beats $200K…..AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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The Products of the Future are Designed by Users

first_imgThe user experience is a crucial part of product design—but how much should companies research user opinions? And how much say should users have in UX? According to Chris Gieger at The User Experience blog…NEC-conference-35Learn from Your Users First; Design Your Product SecondUsing the example of a shopping cart designed by IDEO—some of the greatest product designers out there—Chris examines how IDEO’s ideology was to hone in on its users, learn as much as possible, and from there, create a product they will not only want, but that they partially designed.IDEO founder and Chairman David Kelly said, “The trick is to find these real experts (users) so that you can learn much more quickly then you could by trying to learn by yourself.”Check out the full story and the IDEO video, too!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Focus Like Steve Jobs Did

first_imgI spend a tremendous amount of effort trying to get company management teams to focus on customer segments, products, and the simplest go-to-market strategies during the expansion stage.  The cleaner the focus, the easier it is to build scalable methodologies, teams of great people, and management systems to scale up a company.Somehow, focus is one of the issues that management teams have the most difficulty with, so I have worked on refining different arguments to get the idea across.  One of the points that I started making more recently is that Steve Jobs, a hero to most entrepreneurs, focused Apple as a key step when he came back to its leadership team in the mid-1990s.I just came across this video of Steve talking about this re-focus at Apple’s Developer Conference in 1997.Apple’s focus allowed the company to come out with a string of new offerings, essentially fewer products that were much more differentiated.  They included iMac, Macbook, iPod, iPhone, MacBook Air, and iPad — so far.You may be too young a company to have too many products, but I will bet that you have the following:Too many customer segments (that you think of as a single segment because you are too product focused), so you aren’t able to truly differentiate your whole product strategy, go-to-market strategy, or both.Too many product features and not enough focus on the few product features that will truly separate you from the pack.A lot of noise in marketing and distribution, because you have too much frantic activity in sales and marketing due to your lack of focus on your market clarity.This may sound a little harsh, but frankly EVERY company can get better with its focus and most companies can get a lot better!What do you think?  Is it time for you to focus like Steve Jobs did?Note: you may argue that Apple is getting unfocused given all of the great products that it has.  As Apple has grown, it has been able to multiply the number of products that it can focus on at any one time, but the products still all fit together into a comprehensive whole and Apple’s major focus is on people like you and me owning as many of the products in the product family as possible!  They also came out with the products one at a time and are very clear about the product upgrade slots and how they all work together to maximize market impact.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Is a Sales Blitz the Right Move or a Distraction from the

first_imgWhen is a sales blitz a good idea? Find out how to identify if your sales force should hit the phones in force, or address some important underlying problem.Anthony Iannarino, President and Chief Sales Officer for SOLUTIONS Staffing, writes in The Sales Blog that while there isn’t anything wrong with a no-holds-barred sales blitz, “it isn’t a magic bullet for poor sales results.” In fact, Iannarino writes, it’s a downright bad idea sometimes. If the sales blitz “is designed to make up for poor numbers,” then you’re applying a short-term plan to a systematic problem.Along the same lines, don’t shorten your sales cycle for the sake of a sales blitz for a temporary boost in numbers, and if you’re relying on the blitz to build opportunities, then you need to address your prospecting problem. Iannarino does list two instances where a sales blitz is a good approach, such as when you’re selling “something transactional” with a short sales cycle, or when “you want to create some excitement around some new offering.” However, if your sales blitz is “an emergency initiative,” Iannarino warns, “you are better served dealing with your real, systemic challenges.”AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Getting Customers to Actually Use Your Free Trials

first_imgThree keys to breaking down the barriers to entry on your free trials. You’ve gone ahead and made free trials available for your SaaS, so conversions should be rolling in any second, right? Not so fast. Just because you’re making your product available doesn’t ensure anyone is going to take the time to actually try it out. So how do you increase the probability that they will? People are busy. People are forgetful. People don’t like barriers to entry. Because of all these things (and more) you need to make your free trial as easy and painless as possible. In this video Peter Cohen, of SaaS Marketing Strategy Advisors, breaks down three tips to make your free trials as enticing, easy, and efficient as possible so more of those free trials turn into conversions.We want to hear from you! What is the best way you’ve found to get customers to use a free trial?AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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