Foster’s Fairplay | Respect the fans

first_imgThis is the week of the ISSA-GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Championships (Champs). It is not unusual in this corner of the globe, and more increasingly, elsewhere as well, for all non-related activity to be placed on hold to accommodate the news from competition bubbling at the country’s National Stadium. The rivalry this year will be at maximum intensity, triggered by a now-settled but debilitating fuss as to whether a young man from the African continent should or should not be allowed to run alongside what are really his own people. But before Foster’s Fairplay gets to the meat of the matter, there are some tempers to be soothed. Last week’s column brought protests from two distinguished members of the Kingston College family. Further information is that there were more, but reference is hereby made to the ones seen by the writer. The article implicated the principal of the named high school in certain unwelcome remarks on local radio. He should have not been so accused, having played no part in the discussion between two top executives of the Champs governing body, the InterSecondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA). It was a case of inaccurate reporting on the part of Foster’s Fairplay and, as such, an apology is in order. It is now given without reservation to the Kingston College principal and any member of the school’s fraternity who might have been offended. While recognising the enormity of the task that the distribution of Champs tickets entails, one is reluctant to come down too heavily on the already burdened organisers. It is simply that they are being asked to do a little more in support of the multitude of fans who are without access to tickets. The conclusion is drawn as a result of a little exercise to test the waters to ascertain the status of persons who were forced to seek alternate means of watching Champs as entry to the Stadium is proving to be so much of a problem. An announcement on social media that five season tickets were available at a cost was met by calls from over 30 individuals, each seeking multiple tickets. What was striking about the requests was that they all came from Kingston College people, whom one would have thought represented the core of supporters of the big event over the years. The fact that they, of all people, were caught empty-handed and with minimal possibility of getting through the turnstiles, told a compelling story – several long time fans are being disenfranchised, unable to partake in what had become a habit. Customers, at all levels, whether in or out of sporting endeavour, need to be respected. It is their input, over time, on which a lot of the success of our sporting people, is built and sustained. So what can be done to save that type of person – perennial supporters – from being denied the opportunity to be a part of the live audience at an occasion in which their interest runs deeply. One is not sure how much thought has been given by ISSA to setting up television screens strategically placed in different regions of the island, where patrons, left without the Stadium option, can go and enjoy the spectacle, even if it means reduced passion and excitement. One thing for sure is that the rivalry, school against school, will not be absent. It could be an interesting challenge for the organiser’s to create an atmosphere where those attending would have access to paraphernalia to identify the Fortis and the Rabalac or any other school that wishes to be so labelled. An additional suggestion is that every so often, there could be shots of the frenzied crowd action beamed in all directions to show what is happening at each of the other viewing centres. Foster’s Fairplay concedes that the hype and razzmatazz on show at the National Stadium is unique, but the placing of Champs centres throughout the country would at least be an attempt to satisfy patrons who are now disgruntled. Too many who have been accustomed to being at the Stadium for this talent-riddled event have been virtually locked out for sheer lack of adequate space to accommodate them. Spreading the entertainment and resultant joy over a wider area should be a consideration to be explored. Try it nuh, ISSA. – For feedback, email: lauriefoster2012@gmail.com. DISENFRANCHISED FANSlast_img read more

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Two Ministers, ‘TOP HEAVY ‘Regional Health management, failing National Ophthalmology Hospital

first_imgDear Editor,At last statutory meeting of the Regional Democratic Council of Region Six, held last Thursday, a number of important issues were highlighted, the most important being the National Ophthalmology Hospital at Port Mourant, which is being managed by the Ministry of Public Health, failing the people of Region Six.After numerous pleadings by the RDC and the media, both Ministers of Public Health and a ‘top heavy’ regional management are unable to ensure that the National Ophthalmology Hospital perform cataract surgeries. Both Ministers promised the residents of Region Six, three months ago, that the situation would be resolved.Unfortunately, the Public Health Ministry failed, and as such, the Regional Health Committee is recommending that the RDC manage the National Ophthalmology Hospital to ensure that these problems are resolved, to ensure efficient delivery of health care.The RDC is presently managing the day-to-day running of the National Psychiatric Hospital. Likewise, the Regional Democratic Council should manage the National Ophthalmology Hospital.This situation exposes the level of incompetence that exists in the APNU/AFC Coalition Government. The People of Region Six are calling for the resignation of both ministers for failing to fix a critical issue that has been existing for the last three years.Regards,Zamal Hussainlast_img read more

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Ombudsman Winston Moore laid to rest

first_imgThe casket bearing the remains of Justice MooreFamily members are comforted by former National Gallery of Art Curator Elfrieda Bissember at the furneral serviceAn outpouring of tributes filled the auditorium of the St Andrews Kirk Presbyterian Church on Friday, as the life of Ombudsman and retired Judge, Winston Moore, was remembered.Justice Winston Lennox Mclennan Moore was remembered in many ways, first, as a husband and father, a confidant, a church and community leader, a helper and by no lesser extent, a judge and Ombudsman.Memories of his life’s journey were shared by those who knew him well, his children, close associates and friends and members of the legal fraternity.The retired Judge, who served as Guyana’s Ombudsman, died on the evening of Friday, September 16, 2016, at the St Joseph’s Mercy Hospital after a short illness.His children said that the retired Judge was a “no-nonsense” person who, during almost every occasion, urged them to “get to the point”.“I have to say that he is someone I highly respected with integrity… Once he was confident that he saw all sides of the story and some of the positives and negatives, he made his decision and I respected him for that,” his daughter said, before breaking down in tears.Meanwhile, speaking on behalf of President David Granger, Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo, who said he knew Justice Moore personally from growing up on the Corentyne, described the late Ombudsman as a great all-rounder.“Today we all share your loss. You have lost the head of your family, this church has lost an elder, civil society has lost a leader and the Government has lost an outstanding public servant. Born in Alness on the Corentyne, Justice Moore was my “countryman”, and that was how we greeted each otherwhile he served as a Judge, lawyer and then Ombudsman. He was a great all-rounder that was also said from the first tribute that was made and his score-board is impressive.”Justice Moore had worked in the private and Public Sectors for some 55 years as a clerk, soldier, lawyer, lecturer, judge and finally as Ombudsman.  He also gave sterling service as an elder of his church and as a leading member of the Lions Club of South Georgetown and Georgetown Stabroek.“The fact of his appointment as Ombudsman – ‘an official who is appointed to receive and investigate complaints of abuses and capricious acts of public officials’ and who is ‘expected to achieve equitable settlements’ – is testimony to his character; to the perception of his honesty, fairness and to his ability to dispense justice,” the Prime Minister said.  Following his retirement from the judiciary some years ago, Justice Moore returned to the Guyana Defence Force as a judge advocate. He had previously served in the Army between 1967 and 1973 as a Lieutenant and was also a member of the Lodge.In 2014, he was appointed Ombudsman, after the office was closed for the some eight years. He was responsible for investigating and resolving complaints by citizens with the aim of identifying issues that were leading to poor services or breaches of citizen’s rights.Justice Moore leaves to mourn his wife, Vera, and three children, along with grandchildren.last_img read more

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Red Thread activist Andaiye Williams loses battle to cancer

first_imgFormer executive member of the Working People’s Alliance (WPA), Andaiye Williams, who was also a recipient of the Golden Arrow of Achievement (AA) died on Friday after battling cancer.Red Thread activist Andaiye WilliamsWilliams, who was a strong activist for women’s rights, was 77 years old at the time of her death. The WPA in an emotional two-page statement said it was saddened by the news of her passing and will most definitely miss her leadership.She was a founder of the Guyana Cancer Society and the Cancer Survivors Action Group and also worked with the Women and Development Unit of the University of the West Indies (WAND) from 1987 to 1992, and from 1987 to 1996 with Caricom.In 1997, she was awarded the Golden Arrow of Achievement, the fourth highest award in the Order of Service of Guyana, for her hard work.“Her passing is a blow to the movement for change and transformation in Guyana and beyond – until the very end she remained a committed soldier of the cause of social justice, women and children rights, working-class liberation and ethnic and racial equality,” WPA said.Williams began her career as a schoolteacher and Foreign Service worker. According to the Party, she never really left the teaching profession as she left her prints on the WPA and Red Thread.The activist will long be remembered as a Black Power activist who saw the movement towards Black pride and dignity as a necessary step in our independence journey. She changed her name from Sandra Williams to Andaiye and wore her hair in the Afro-style of the day—these two symbols remained part of her identity for the rest of her life, the WPA wrote.The legend returned to her homeland in 1977 after being urged by her classmates, Walter Rodney and Rupert Roopnarine, both of whom had become associated with the newly formed WPA. She joined the party and played a pivotal role in its development as one of the most formidable radical parties in the Caribbean.She was able to serve the party in various capacities, especially as a writer and editor of the party’s publications and as its International Secretary but was equally involved in spreading the politics of change and transformation across Guyana.“In later years, she became disenchanted with political parties and thought that enough energy was not being put into building non-party movements. As WPA mourns her passing, we call on Guyana and the Caribbean to emulate the example of Andaiyes of our Caribbean. She died like most revolutionaries in our country and region—forgotten and marginalised by the political elites whose power came from the struggles and sacrifices of these very forgotten souls. But the WPA is comforted by the fact that Sister Andaiye died knowing that she selflessly gave her life to the service of country, region and humanity. In her name and by her example, we forge on,” the Party stated.President David Granger also sent out condolences to Williams’ family as he lauded her for her years of dedication to Guyana.last_img read more

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Residents concerned over possible fee increases at airport

first_imgIn addition he says, in Grande Prairie, where the rates are already lower than in Fort St. John, consideration is now being given to a fee reduction. Kevin called landing fees a short term burst of income, that subsequently result in aviation business being siphoned away from facilities which apply them.He says there’s already evidence of that occurring in this region… [asset|aid=2910|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=10e4dcd578cc77df839bf3e3a898459d-Kevin Hrab-2_2_Pub.mp3] He adds the ultimate concern is that landing fees at the Fort St. John airport are already at the high end of the regional scale.Advertisement By Dwight FordConcerns about the operational direction of the local airport were front and centre today on Issues and Answers.Kevin Hrab saying he represents the local aviation community was Adam Reaburn’s guest….- Advertisement – [asset|aid=2908|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=10e4dcd578cc77df839bf3e3a898459d-Kevin Hrab-1_2_Pub.mp3] At issue are proposed fee increases for airport users…. [asset|aid=2909|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=10e4dcd578cc77df839bf3e3a898459d-Kevin Hrab-3_1_Pub.mp3] Advertisementlast_img read more

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A full house with love, kids

first_imgLANCASTER The girls’ adoptive names are tributes to the hardships they’ve overcome. Heaven was born addicted to drugs. Serenity had a hole in her brain. Miracle needed a liver transplant. And then there’s Jozee, whose name doesn’t follow the same ethereal pattern as her sisters. Born Josephine, she nearly drowned at 8 months and suffered brain damage. Her adoptive parents knew she might remember her birth name and didn’t want to confuse her with a completely new one. Born to transients, prisoners and teen moms, the girls got their starts in life in foster care. Medical conditions made their ride through the hard-knock system even tougher. But that ride came to an end when they were adopted by foster parents Donna and Ernesto Del Alto of Lancaster. “Maybe it was because I was in foster care,” said Donna, explaining why she adopted the girls. “I have a brother who is mentally retarded, and I think that’s what drew me into it, too.” Medical problems are not uncommon with foster care children, since many have faced abuse and neglect at the hands of their parents and caregivers. When they first enter the court system, about 80 percent have a chronic medical condition, such as asthma, failure to grow, or problems with seeing and hearing. Some have multiple illnesses. The Del Alto girls represent a minority of foster care children who are deemed medically fragile and whose varying conditions require special care. There are as many as 400 of them among the 30,000 foster children living in Los Angeles County. At 5, Jozee is the oldest of the four sisters and requires the most attention. Her birth mother, suspected of being on drugs, had left her alone in a bathtub. The damage sabotaged her brain, leaving her partially paralyzed and unable to see or speak. Two years ago her throat became paralyzed after recurrent bouts of pneumonia. The brown-haired Jozee lay in a recliner in the family’s living room this week for a tube feeding. Her sisters touched her arm, talked softly to her and watched for any reactions. The child lifted her arms and hands from time to time, as if waving. Donna sees Jozee’s movements as signs of improvement. The activity confirms for her that she made the right decision for surgery to help Jozee breathe after the paralyzation. Doctors had discouraged the operation on the girl who they’d diagnosed as semi-comatose and had recommended that she die naturally. “I said save her,’” the 42-year-old said. “She fought so hard to live. I don’t feel she’s ready to go.” The Del Altos have been foster parents for 10 years. Along the way they learned of children in the system with severe medical conditions, ranging from cancer to Down syndrome, who need foster parents. They were interested and wanted to help. When children with severe medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy, don’t find foster parents, they’re usually placed in pediatric facilities in hospitals where they receive round-the-clock supervision, said Jose L. Galindo, social worker for the Department of Children and Family Services. Galindo said those with less debilitating conditions, such as diabetes, can live in other care facilities, such as homes that medical staffs regularly visit. The thought of a sick child living without the comforts of a home troubled the Del Altos, who then became certified to take them in. Donna also enrolled in nursing school. When the first foster call came through, it was to take in a baby with a broken bone in her hip. She was in a cast from the waist down. She wasn’t in their care long before the baby’s grandmother came forward to claim her. Then Miracle came into their lives. They saw her in the hospital, bloated and with eyes and skin yellowing because her liver was malfunctioning. When they learned she could die, the Del Altos weren’t sure they wanted to take her home, wondering if their family could handle the heartache. But the next day the couple visited her again at the hospital. This time they brought their children Tony, 23, Angel, 21, and Emmalee, 17. After explaining the circumstances of the sick baby who lay before them, they asked their kids what they should do. “Take her,” they said, shuddering that she could die alone. But she thrived. As did Jozee, who came next, then Heaven and Serenity. And while their medical conditions are under control for now, the girls could still face more difficulties in the future, including mental health problems, whether it’s from trauma they endured as babies or possibly passed on genetically. Donna and Ernesto have taken classes in mental health and said they are ready to look for the signs as the girls get older. So will they adopt more children? At first Donna said no, but in the same breath she changed her answer to “probably after I finish school.” The couple is waiting to see if the girls have siblings in the system who are searching for permanent homes. Sitting in a recliner, Ernesto grinned at the four girls while a Barney video played on the wide-screened TV in the living room. As the program played, 5-year-old Miracle danced across the floor while Serenity, 2, followed step. Heaven pulled a small suitcase into the room and pulled out a tiara, which she adjusted to fit her head. Growing up in a family with 12 brothers and sisters, Ernesto said he’s at home with all the commotion the kids make. “What can you do?” he said and shrugged. “They all need love.” sue.doyle@dailynews.com (661)257-5254 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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ATHLETICS: PATSY McGONAGLE’S ATHLETICS REPORT

first_imgThe 2011 track/field season for Finn Valley athletes ended on a record breaking high at Antrim in the Celtic international Saturday –  of course there is one exception in that Tori Pena competes at the Daegu World Championships on August 28th.That said, the Ulster team led by Bernie Alcorn included 6 Valley members.Top of the list John Kelly from Carrickmore, St Johnstone, who not only won the shot but got the ball out to 17.56m setting a new Celtic record –  indeed the record set some 17 years ago by the current Irish senior shot champion Sean Breathmach from West Galway. So to say that the father John the coach and the son John the athlete combination were happy only begins to sum up the day…. indeed the season up. He also got a second spot also in the javelin.Fellan Mc Guigan notched a victory in the hammer getting out to 60.03m with the 5kg weight only the AAAs left now for this talented boy. A tie at 1.55 for 1st saw Blaithnaid Patton in the mix with 2 other girls and Shaun Woods a pb in the 4oom for third on 50.64 plus a 30.46 pb for Jade Leeper in the discus and a 3rd spot in the steeple for Dalton Mc Guigan at 6.31.73.So ends another season and before you can take a breather the call to return to training for the cross country athletes has gone out remembering that the Finn Valley invitational primary and secondary schools cross country is only some 5 weeks away in last week of September.The new ground to be the focus for rugby at the Centre was launched Sunday and the local team make their entry to the Ulster scene in the coming weeks yet another activity at the Centre which also launched its Autumn/winter programme of activity this week phone 0749132053 or check www.finnvalleyac.com. An interesting result also Saturday with the victory of Jason Quigley in the Irish open senior boxing as he pushes for the number 1 spot .Great news from Belgium Saturday with Mark English 800m  Irish junior record 1 47.09 erasing old mark held by twice olympian James Nolan 1.47.55 from 1996 .Of course his second Donegal record of the season a 48.02 400m earlier .Patsy Mc gonagle has left for Daegu his 4th world championship as national team senior manager Seville 1999,Osaka 2007,Berlin 2009 his previous responsibilities.

Upcoming road races Brockagh and Ballyare and a final reminder to book your place on the training weekend in Ballylifffin September with either Mark or Kieran to date 34 have signed up  and to keep September 30th free for official opening of new track./pitch and floodlights.ATHLETICS: PATSY McGONAGLE’S ATHLETICS REPORT was last modified: August 14th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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ALL-IRELAND CHAMPION BOXERS RECKON BRIDE IS A ‘KNOCKOUT’!

first_imgYou wouldn’t think it from the photo above but between this mob a total of THIRTEEN All-Ireland boxing titles were won. What makes it even more incredible is the fact that all the champions in the photo come from the one family! Gerard Gallagher (FIVE) Michael Gallagher (TWO) Christy Boyle (FOUR) Joe Harkin (ONE) and Marc McGee (ONE) all won All-Ireland titles out of the Dunfanaghy boxing club.Gerard Gallagher and brother Michael are first cousins with Joe Harkin, Marc McGee and Christy Boyle.They all won their titles under the stewardship of their uncle Eddie Harkin – so it really was a family affair.All the gang were together again for the first time in years at the wedding of Christy Boyle’s sister Diane. Diane flew back home from Australia to marry Inishowen man John Doherty whom she met Down Under.As you see can from the photo – the bride looked stunning on her big day and all the lads agreed she looked like a ‘knockout’.At the end of the night all the boys were in deep discussion at the possibility of a comeback with Rio just around the corner.It hasn’t been confirmed whether that will develop or not, as for now St Michael’s manager Eddie Harkin is fully focused on their championship campaign which gets back underway again next weekend.  ALL-IRELAND CHAMPION BOXERS RECKON BRIDE IS A ‘KNOCKOUT’! was last modified: August 14th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:newsSportlast_img read more

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Man City tracking highly-rated Nice midfielder – reports

first_img REVEALED RANKED Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti LATEST TRANSFER NEWS The Frenchman was reportedly being closely monitored by Real Madrid last summer, while he also has admirers in Italy.City have also been linked with the midfielder and, according to Le10Sport, the Premier League champions have sent a delegation of scouts to France to keep tabs on him.Cyprien is yet to provide any indication that he is willing to leave Nice in the near future, but the opportunity of a move to England could well present itself as the January window approaches. Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer targets Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade 1 targets Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland IN DEMAND Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Manchester City have sent scouts to keep track of highly-rated Nice midfielder Wylan Cyprien, according to reports in France.The 23-year-old has been a stand-out performer in Ligue 1 for the past few seasons and he has been tipped for a big-money move in the near future. Cyprien has caught the eye of Europe’s top clubs LATEST The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star moving on LIVING THE DREAM last_img read more

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Fewer suicide bombs in November

first_imgBAGHDAD, Iraq – Suicide bombings fell in November to their lowest level in seven months, the American military said Thursday, citing the success of U.S.-Iraqi military operations against insurgent and foreign fighter sanctuaries near the Syrian border. But the trend in Iraq has not resulted in less bloodshed: 85 U.S. troops died during the month, one of the highest tolls since the invasion. In Ramadi, 70 miles west of Baghdad, the U.S. military played down reports by residents and police of widespread attacks Thursday against American and Iraqi installations in the city. The military said only one rocket-propelled grenade was fired at an observation post, causing no casualties. Insurgents left behind posters and graffiti saying they were members of al-Qaida in Iraq. Nevertheless, Maj. Gen. Rick Lynch, a coalition operations officer, warned that al-Qaida in Iraq, led by Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, will likely step up attacks in the next two weeks to try to disrupt parliamentary elections Dec. 15. However, suicide attacks have not consistently decreased over the past year. After more than 70 such attacks in May, the number fell in August by nearly half and then climbed to over 50 two months later. And despite the decline over the past month, there has been no letup in the relentless toll of American deaths at a time of growing discontent in the United States over the Iraq war. The U.S. command said Thursday that four American service members were killed the day before, three of them from hostile action and the fourth in a traffic accident. The deaths raised the American fatality toll for November to at least 85. That was down from the 96 American deaths suffered in October – the fourth deadliest month since the war began in March 2003. But it was well above the 49 deaths in September. U.S. monthly death tolls have hit 80 or above during 10 of the 33 months of the war. There also has been no decline over the past six months in the Iraqi death toll from suicide attacks, according to an Associated Press tally. In November, at least 290 Iraqis were killed in such attacks, more than double the figure from the previous month. The count shows the Iraqi toll ranging from at least 69 deaths in August to at least 356 in September. November’s suicide attacks included near-simultaneous bombings at two Shiite mosques in Khanaqin, killing 76; a car bombing at a Shiite funeral north of the capital, killing 36; and a car bombing near a hospital in Mahmoudiya, killing 30. In Ramadi, police Lt. Mohammed al-Obaidi said at least four mortar rounds fell near the U.S. base on the city’s eastern edge. Residents also said scores of masked gunmen, believed to be members of al-Qaida in Iraq, ran into the streets but dispersed after launching attacks with mortars. An AP Television News video showed masked insurgents walking down a shuttered market street and a residential neighborhood, as well as firing four mortar rounds. The gunmen appeared relaxed, and the U.S. command dismissed the video as little more than a publicity stunt. Ramadi is the capital of Anbar province, a Sunni Arab stronghold, where clashes between insurgents and U.S. and Iraqi troops have left hundreds of people dead over the past two years. U.S. and Iraqi troops launched a joint operation near Ramadi on Wednesday, sweeping through an area used to rig car bombs. The brief burst of insurgent activity in Ramadi appeared aimed at diverting attention from a meeting between U.S. officials and local tribal leaders in a bid to ease tensions in the city. In the posters and graffiti they left behind, insurgents claimed responsibility for shooting down a U.S. drone. There were no reports of any U.S. drones being shot down, however. Also Thursday, the top official for human rights in the Interior Ministry was dismissed in connection with an inquiry into allegations of torture by government security forces. Nouri al-Nouri, the ministry’s chief inspector for corruption cases and human rights violations, was fired on the order of Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari, an official said. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media. Al-Nouri, a Shiite, had been in the post since the handover of sovereignty to Iraqis in June 2004. Al-Jaafari, also a Shiite, ordered an investigation into the alleged mistreatment of up to 173 detainees after U.S. forces entered an Interior Ministry lockup Nov. 13 and found that some of those held there showed signs of torture. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Lynch told reporters that suicide bombings declined to 23 in November as U.S. and Iraqi forces were overrunning insurgent strongholds in the Euphrates River valley west of the capital. Communities along the river are believed used by foreign fighters, who slip into the country from Syria and travel down the river highway to Baghdad and other cities. Lynch called suicide bombings the insurgents’ “weapon of choice” because they can inflict a high number of casualties while sacrificing only the attacker. Classic infantry ambushes draw withering American return fire, resulting in heavy insurgent losses. “In the month of November: only 23 suicide attacks – the lowest we’ve seen in the last seven months, the direct result of the effectiveness of our operations,” Lynch said. Car bombings – parked along streets and highways and detonated remotely – have declined from 130 in February to 68 in November, Lynch said. last_img read more

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